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smidsy
2nd Aug 2004, 07:59 PM
Hei Guys,
Does anyone have one of these, I got one today
The one thing it doesn't have compared to the Woodfast version is nylon wheels but at $79 compared to $215 I thought that was an acceptable sacrifice.

The first task I used it for was to hold the end of a jarrah handle I made for a chisel and I noticed that even though I was working with fairly hard jarrah that the bearings did mark the timber.

Plan B is to get some nylon and make some wheels to go over the bearings, since I'm unlikely to need the full throat I figure I can lose 2 or 3 mm of capacity.

The other thing I would like to do is tap the flange underneath so I can adjust the travel one handed.

Has anyone tried either of these mods - comments suggestions.

Cheers
Smidsy

Sprog
5th Aug 2004, 01:19 PM
Hei Guys,

I noticed that even though I was working with fairly hard jarrah that the bearings did mark the timber.

Plan B is to get some nylon and make some wheels to go over the bearings,

Cheers
Smidsy

Smidsy,

Check out inline skate wheels they make good supports for steady rests and do not mark the timber.

:D

smidsy
5th Aug 2004, 01:28 PM
Hei Sprog,
I actually bought a meter of nylon bar stock yesterday to turn some wheels - if you used skate wheels you would have to turn them down substantially or you'd lose too much capacity.
Cheers
Smidsy

Sprog
5th Aug 2004, 01:57 PM
I made my own steady so the diameter of the wheels didn't matter as this was factored into the design

:D

Alastair
5th Aug 2004, 03:09 PM
When using a 'hard' steady, which can mark the wood, another tactic is to leave the spot where the steady will be running slightly over-diameter.

Once you have conpleted the turning/hollowing, you remove the steady, and using LIGHT cuts, with support from your free hand if necessary, clean up the marked area to final diameter and profile.

A thought to consider, as any non marking wheel is going to be flexible to a degree, which means that under heavy load, it will allow some deflection of the workpiece. This could possibly initiate a dig???

Alastair

Sprog
5th Aug 2004, 03:30 PM
A thought to consider, as any non marking wheel is going to be flexible to a degree, which means that under heavy load, it will allow some deflection of the workpiece. This could possibly initiate a dig???

Alastair

I think it would be prudent not to subject the work to a heavy load if the work was of a nature that required the use of a steady and to stick with light cuts.

rsser
5th Aug 2004, 04:10 PM
Smidsy, the specs on the unit say it fits a centre height of 150mm and 175mm - does that mean a centre range between those figures?

TIA,

rsser, aka Ern

smidsy
5th Aug 2004, 06:05 PM
Hei Em,
What they mean by height is the distance from the bed to where the centre of work will be.
The Torquata steady is designed for the MC900/1100, the MC900 has a maximum bowl diameter of about 300mm so the height from the bed to the head shaft is about 150mm - that is the measurement they mean by height.
In terms of work size, the specs state 6mm to 80mm - this is the size of the work that will fit inside the arms of the steady.

As for wheels guys, I found a place called Dotmar Plastics (they have branches all over Oz) and I got some nylon bar stock from there. They have all different hardnesses, I explained what I wanted it for and I got some 6SA spec which they say is hard enough to minimize flex but softer than metal.

Cheers
Smidsy

rsser
5th Aug 2004, 06:07 PM
Thanks; good one

Babytoolman
6th Aug 2004, 10:43 AM
Does anyone have a picture of this? I did an intenet search and it didn't come up with anything.

roger

smidsy
6th Aug 2004, 12:08 PM
Try
http://www.timbecon.com.au/productsdetail.asp?sectid=12550&parentid=12479&prodid=28884

If that doesn't work, go to timbecon.com.au then look in woodturning - lathe accessories.

Cheers
Smidsy

Sprog
6th Aug 2004, 12:21 PM
Does anyone have a picture of this? I did an intenet search and it didn't come up with anything.

roger


Have a look at a home made steady.

Lathe Steady (http://www.jeanmichel.org/steady.htm)

I made mine for a lot less than $20 from a similar design.

smidsy
6th Aug 2004, 01:00 PM
Hei Sprog,
The problem I see with that design is that there is no opening so you have to take the work off to fit it.
I only put my steady on the lathe when I need it because it gets in the way of the tool rest, and with the main body being open I can leave the work in place, fit the steady and get the guides perfect before I remove the tail stock.
Cheers
Smidsy

Sprog
6th Aug 2004, 04:43 PM
Hi Smidsy,

You are absolutely correct, I thought the same when I saw that design.

The one I made is a variation with an opening at the side, just like the Torquata model.

smidsy
6th Aug 2004, 10:19 PM
Hei Sprog,
That beast looks pretty flash, what material did you use.
I notice you're in WA, do you ever get to the Liddlelow turning group?
Cheers
Smidsy

Sprog
8th Aug 2004, 01:52 AM
Hei Sprog,
That beast looks pretty flash, what material did you use.
I notice you're in WA, do you ever get to the Liddlelow turning group?
Cheers
Smidsy

Hi Smidsy,

MDF for the frame and ply for the arms and base parts.
No, never get to that group, I am in the northern suburbs.