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Stef
20th Sep 2009, 10:46 PM
Here are the photos of my first lot of bowls that i made on a Vicmarc laythe that i bought about 9 months ago. Im only just getting around to using it now and now that i have made a few things im hooked.
The first bowl or should i say ash tray is made from apricot, the second bowl is red gum burl and the third is gidgee i think, if it is not then it is mulga. I got it when i bought the laythe and its been so long that im not 100% sure.
The finish for all 3 bowls is 4 coats of Ubeauts whit shellac and 4 coats of minwax wipe on polly and they are gleeming.
The apricot and the gidgee is pretty special timber and im lucky enough to have some more to practice with.
Ive got a few more pieces that are nearly ready for a few coats of shellac/polly mix , as soon as there done i will post up the pics. These other pieces are from timbers such as Nolfolk Island Pine, Silver Birch, Apricot, Blackwood, Cedar Wattle, Sheoak, Bulloak, Blackbox and Yellowbox burls and Red Gum.

Cheers Stef.

hughie
20th Sep 2009, 11:08 PM
:U got hooked, not hard to do. :2tsup:

Darn good finish and great choice of timbers, well done

artme
21st Sep 2009, 03:04 AM
:whs: Even though I'm no so fond of such a high gloss on pieces like this.:2tsup::2tsup::2tsup:

Stef
21st Sep 2009, 06:30 AM
:whs: Even though I'm no so fond of such a high gloss on pieces like this.:2tsup::2tsup::2tsup:


Thanks.

Artme I would still like to experiment with an oil finish, prolly danish oil and maybe i will try the minwax satin instead of the gloss. Whatever I try I will post up the pics.

Cheers Stef.

artme
21st Sep 2009, 08:38 AM
Good onya Stef.:):):)

I have a preference for soft, lustrous finishes. Sometimes however, a high gloss is the right way to go. Everyone has their own tastes and it will pay you to experiment, because if you intend to sell you will need a range to suit those tastes.

Ed Reiss
21st Sep 2009, 12:19 PM
Stef, not bad for your first efforts, and the good part is that it only gets better.:2tsup:

A finish you might consider using is Waterlox tung oil... it seals a finishes with a single application, but of course like many things in life 5 to 10 coats are more realistic to get a deep finish.

Stef
21st Sep 2009, 01:24 PM
A finish you might consider using is Waterlox tung oil... it seals a finishes with a single application, but of course like many things in life 5 to 10 coats are more realistic to get a deep finish.[/QUOTE]

I just bought a bottle of pure tung oil a few days ago form the paint shop but its not that brand. Will see if Waterlox is available here in OZ and give it a go if i can find it.

Ed what makes Waterlox different from standard pure tung oil?

Cheers Stef.

Rum Pig
21st Sep 2009, 02:13 PM
Nice bowls Stef:2tsup::2tsup::2tsup:

I'm not a big fan of high gloss on bowls and the like but something like the ash tray where you need that extra protection I think I it is acceptable but that is just my opinion.

As you said trial and error are the best way to learn. Good luck with the next set of bowls.:2tsup:

Manuka Jock
21st Sep 2009, 03:33 PM
Top work Stef .
You are indeed hooked . Sadly , there is no turning back for you now mate :no:

I like the high gloss finish , its' great for display pieces , where the hard work doesn't get marked with use.
And the low sheen ones , satin , oil etc , for working treen .

Great figure in the wood to .

Welcome to the nutfarm :D

dai sensei
21st Sep 2009, 08:00 PM
:whs:

Please keep the photos coming :2tsup:

Ed Reiss
21st Sep 2009, 11:06 PM
Stef, pure tung oil on it's own will never dry, need to add what's called japan drier. The mix proportion is 10 milliliters drier to 1 liter tung oil.

Waterlox is a tung oil finish that has the drier already mixed in. If the Waterlox brand isn't available in OZ, there are a number of other brands out there.

Mrs Woodpecker
22nd Sep 2009, 01:11 PM
Great work, Stef. It is very easy to get hooked.
Well done,
Shirley

munruben
22nd Sep 2009, 11:11 PM
Nice work, looks good.:2tsup: