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flutetears
24th Dec 2009, 03:04 PM
Anyone have an idea what I have done to this bowl?
It looks like a gum residual That I cant get rid of. sanding don't seem to help.
Thanks for any ideas this is the first time I have run into this. Yes I am new to bowl turning but not to wood working.
Brad

Texian
24th Dec 2009, 03:11 PM
G'day flute,
Welcome to the forum. Surely someone here can answer your question. Are you referring to the sort of whitish area(s)? Is "Co" Colorado (US)?

dai sensei
24th Dec 2009, 03:12 PM
Are you referring to the bark inclusion or the tear out?

I would drizzle thin CA on the bark inclusion then sand as usual.

With the tear out, try a shear cut, or just drop back a few grades of sandpaper (say 80 or 120 until tear-out is gone, then work throught the grits again until smooth)

Hope this helps

flutetears
24th Dec 2009, 03:13 PM
G'day flute,
Welcome to the forum. Surely someone here can answer your question. Are you referring to the sort of whitish area(s)?

yes that whitish area is the problem it looks like it is on top of the grain but just don't seem to want to come off.

flutetears
24th Dec 2009, 03:14 PM
G'day flute,
Welcome to the forum. Surely someone here can answer your question. Are you referring to the sort of whitish area(s)? Is "Co" Colorado (US)?

Opps yes Colorado

flutetears
24th Dec 2009, 03:18 PM
Are you referring to the bark inclusion or the tear out?

I would drizzle thin CA on the bark inclusion then sand as usual.

With the tear out, try a shear cut, or just drop back a few grades of sandpaper (say 80 or 120 until tear-out is gone, then work throught the grits again until smooth)

Hope this helps

Tear out hmm I have hit it with 80 grit power sanding and dont seem to be able to get it out it seems to have an edge to it
Well back to the sanding
Thanks

Texian
24th Dec 2009, 03:18 PM
Beats me. Might try some solvents, maybe paint thinner first, then lacquer thinner or acetone if the paint thinner has no effect. Just guessing though.

Neil, had another look and it does look like tearout. Might wipe on a coat of sanding sealer and then follow either of Neil's suggestions..

flutetears
24th Dec 2009, 03:22 PM
Beats me. Might try some solvents, maybe paint thinner first, then lacquer thinner or acetone if the paint thinner has no effect. Just guessing though.
I did try some thinner but I used denature alcohol Had no effect on it.

Texian
24th Dec 2009, 03:35 PM
If it is tearout, Neil had the right suggestion. Shear scraping and/or more sanding.

dai sensei
24th Dec 2009, 03:36 PM
Sounds like you need to seal it as Texian suggested. Solvent wont seal it, have you any thin CA, or thinned shellac? Soak it, let it dry, then sand.

flutetears
24th Dec 2009, 03:38 PM
Sounds like you need to seal it as Texian suggested. Solvent wont seal it, have you any thin CA, or thinned shellac? Soak it, let it dry, then sand.
LOL
do I have any CA LOL
it might soak up the whole bottle but That may be the fix I need.
Thanks

WOODbTURNER
24th Dec 2009, 04:09 PM
Just had the same problem with a Raintree bowl. I ended up using sanding sealer to bind the fibres then shear cut with superflute gouge. It came up a treat.

tea lady
24th Dec 2009, 05:11 PM
:pi: so what sort of wood is it? Sometimes if it is resinous or oily wood the heat from sanding can set the resin into the hardest material known to man. :C You prolly need to attach it with a gouge or very sharp scraper to remove then try and sand with new paper and a light touch. If it is getting warm at all move to a new bit of sandpaper cos its just rubbing not cutting anyway,:shrug:

That's my 2cents worth anyway.

rsser
24th Dec 2009, 07:54 PM
Interesting.

Could be the Chinaman's horse kinda thing.

You have this grey bloom on end grain on the left but not on the right side. Same on the inside as far as the pic shows.

Not seen grey bloom like this before.

This is unfinished untreated timber?

flutetears
25th Dec 2009, 12:18 AM
:pi: so what sort of wood is it? Sometimes if it is resinous or oily wood the heat from sanding can set the resin into the hardest material known to man. :C You prolly need to attach it with a gouge or very sharp scraper to remove then try and sand with new paper and a light touch. If it is getting warm at all move to a new bit of sandpaper cos its just rubbing not cutting anyway,:shrug:

That's my 2cents worth anyway.
Well I think it is oak but not 100% sure of that.
Looks like everyone is thinking sharp tools and sharp sandpaper and light touch.
Somthing I try to do all of the time

flutetears
25th Dec 2009, 12:29 AM
The wood was kiln dried. And yes it is on the inside of the bowl and on the other side to seems to be part of the wood grain.

joe greiner
25th Dec 2009, 12:35 AM
Does the far side exhibit the same, on the opposite side of the plane through the pith? If so, it's an unfortunate combination of sanding direction and grain alignment. Sanding sealer could reinforce the fibers, for re-cutting or re-sanding. I'd also try hand sanding, parallel to the grain (neither radial nor tangential) - I've had some successful fixes that way, to eliminate machine sanding bounce from hard to soft.

[I missed your last reply.]

Cheers,
Joe

Ed Reiss
25th Dec 2009, 01:04 PM
Hi Brad...welcome to the "forums" aka a good place!!!

By any chance, did you apply a finish prior to sanding, and if so, what kind?

flutetears
26th Dec 2009, 01:34 AM
Hi Brad...welcome to the "forums" aka a good place!!!

By any chance, did you apply a finish prior to sanding, and if so, what kind?
No Finish was aplied before sanding.

I worked with it yesterday and found that it is bleading from the wood at the bark inclusion I was able to sand the top off it was like a wax now it has come back.
On the other side is an bark inclusion as well and for the most part the same stuff.
So my plan is to let it sit for a long time and see if it will dry up. or what every its going to do.
Thanks all for your thoughts if things change on the bowl I let you know but this one just may be on that did not make it

mick61
26th Dec 2009, 02:34 PM
G`day It looks like tearout to me sometimes it just can`t be fixed because you have torn out the fibers they could be quite deep mm`s in length. I would try steel wool by hand then finish with beeswax which will help to hide it. Or use steel wool get as good as you can then go through the sanding grades finish with beeswax.Goodluck .
Mick:D

flutetears
3rd Jan 2010, 02:19 AM
Figured I would post what I have learned about this bowl.
It is tare out of the wood as most of you said. I just got done with another bowl of the same wood and some of the same problem popped up. I was getting some vibration when the bowl was getting down to size and sure enough same problem.
I have constructed two types of bowl steady rest guess its time to put them to use now. It sure is hard to get this problem out of the wood when it happens still working on that. Going out today to buy some curved cabinet scrapers and see what I can do.
Thanks