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Sturdee
1st Jan 2010, 05:11 PM
Too many years ago I bought a cheap Taiwanese lathe and a set of turning tools. After the initial enthusiasm it got relegated and forgotten until my daughter got interested in turning after seeing an episode of the New Yankee Workshop.

So the lathe got dusted off and moved into the back part of the workshop and she has irregularly (having to fit in with studies and work) turned various items. She always complained about the lathe and tools not being good enough, but they seemed to fall on deaf ears. :D

However at the WWW Show last year I did some hands on turning with Tim Skeltonís workshop and turning on a good lathe and with good tools rekindled my desire to learn to turn and upgrade my equipment.

So I bought a new lathe, being the MC900 version from Hare & Forbes at a good price and started to get the various tools and accessories that I wanted.

The lathe is bolted onto the bench, has dust collection near it as well as compressed air. I made some timber banjos to hold the lights which are switched from the front of the bench, and installed an emergency switch to turn the lathe of. I also altered the banjo from the old lathe to fit the new lathe giving an extra banjo.

I have altered some of the open shelves underneath to slide out drawers and have still 3 more to go making the storage of equipment easier.

Here are some photos showing the setup.

Photo 1 is the main view of the lathe.The big red switch is the kill switch. The small red switch operates an existing mini cyclone located in an soundproof box on the other side of the wall. The dust collection hose is like an elephantís trunk as it can extend to 3 metres and dragging over the floor cleans all the mess.

Photo 2 is the view to the left. The fan mounted on the thicknesser helps to keep me cool.

Photo 3 is the view of the wall behind. Got a little bit of sandpaper in grits from 80 to 320.:p

The remaining photos show some of the drawers Iíve made to organise the bits and pieces.

Still much more to do but it's a start.

Peter.

Sawdust Maker
1st Jan 2010, 06:05 PM
Nice lookin setup :2tsup:
I'm green with envy :q

Big Shed
1st Jan 2010, 06:08 PM
Great setup Peter, you should enjoy using that and so will the daughter:2tsup:

Sturdee
1st Jan 2010, 07:05 PM
Great setup Peter, you should enjoy using that and so will the daughter:2tsup:

Yes, it's becoming a good place to be.

I should also mention that the concrete floor is covered with dense foam interlocking mats (similar to kid's play mats) and also a large anti-fatigue mat. Totally insulated and soundproofed and good sound system to help the time pass.

Peter.

beejay1
1st Jan 2010, 07:21 PM
Tidy and imaginative as always Peter! although the Jacobs chuck drawer could do with a vac:)
Great looking set up.
Kind regards, beejay1

Mulgabill
1st Jan 2010, 08:50 PM
Bloody hell Peter:oo::oo::oo::oo: Not a cob web in sight! How could you work in conditions like that???:;

Tony Morton
1st Jan 2010, 09:13 PM
Hi Peter

This a wood work forum,not house and garden, how do you keep it so clean a workshop is ment to have evidence of at the last few jobs. Looks good all the same.

Cheers Tony

Ad de Crom
1st Jan 2010, 09:49 PM
Peter, very nice workshop, much nicer than mine.
And everything well organized, mine is most of the time messy.
Happy New Year.
Ad

Sturdee
1st Jan 2010, 10:20 PM
Hi Peter

This a wood work forum,not house and garden, how do you keep it so clean a workshop is ment to have evidence of at the last few jobs. Looks good all the same.

Cheers Tony

Having an effective dust collection system helps to keep it clean, pulling on the D/C hose extends it and moving it across the surface it sucks it all up. Takes no time to clean up and I dislike working in a dirty shop.

But I left some dirt in the chuck drawer.:D

Takes a while to organize things, but once done it's nice to be able to find things.


Peter.

Ed Reiss
2nd Jan 2010, 01:17 AM
:2tsup:

Allen Neighbors
2nd Jan 2010, 01:05 PM
Awesome shop... however... I've heard that a clean shop is a sign of a dirty mind. :D
Fine shed, though... makes me a little bit green... :)

Tony Morton
2nd Jan 2010, 02:29 PM
And Allan i've heard a tidy workshop is a sign of an unimaginative mind.

Cheers Tony

Sawdust Maker
2nd Jan 2010, 10:05 PM
anyone seen a piccy of Albert Einstein's desk?

Manuka Jock
3rd Jan 2010, 06:47 AM
Yep :U

Allen Neighbors
3rd Jan 2010, 06:53 AM
Looks like my shed, only a mite cleaner. :D

Frank&Earnest
3rd Jan 2010, 11:14 AM
Thanks Sturdee, I am most grateful to you. Not for bragging about your immaculate shed, but for dragging out all the messy guys like me and the reference to Einstein's desk. I'll make an enlargement of it and frame it over my desk to shut up my wife...:D

Old farmer
3rd Jan 2010, 11:23 AM
Thanks for the great pics. of a great shed, Peter. Very inspirational. I shall never get there but, now, I know where I am heading!!

Groggy
3rd Jan 2010, 11:34 AM
Peter, despite your problems throughout the last few years you still manage to do that! Well done mate, it reminds me of a workshop on a ship, every space used and nice and tidy. I especially like the dust collection being integral with the rest of the layout. :2tsup:

orificiam
3rd Jan 2010, 03:03 PM
Congrats, Peter Nice workshop and well organised, I'm sure you'll be very happy with the Lathe--I got the same model 8 years ago and the only thing I've had to replace is the Pulley Belt.
Cheers Tony.:2tsup:

munruben
3rd Jan 2010, 04:22 PM
Great workshop and set up Peter. I am green with envy at how neat you keep everything. Well done.:2tsup::2tsup:

rsser
3rd Jan 2010, 06:28 PM
Nifty setup Peter.

PS Einstein never wore socks; couldn't see the point.

Perhaps his Missus could however :rolleyes:

joe greiner
3rd Jan 2010, 10:59 PM
Very nice setup. Mine is just as organized, but only in my dreams.

I have the Harbor Freight version of that lathe - a carbon copy, including the yellow safety label, except green instead of blue. You may find it helpful to raise it from the bench for fingertip access to the adjusting nuts for the banjo and the tailstock; they can loosen from vibration. The bed is strong enough to span between supports. Some additional floor mats could compensate for the increased height, if it becomes uncomfortable.

Cheers,
Joe

jow104
3rd Jan 2010, 11:03 PM
Peter that takes me back 5 years, stayed the night at Cranbrook, and then on to Lang Lang.

Harry72
4th Jan 2010, 12:37 AM
I see that bucket of white paint is still going!
Looks good Sturdee

Sturdee
4th Jan 2010, 01:36 PM
Not for bragging about your immaculate shed, but for dragging out all the messy guys like me and the reference to Einstein's desk. I'll make an enlargement of it and frame it over my desk to shut up my wife...:D

Thanks, but not all of my shop is as immaculate, in one corner of the main part are paint tins and stacks of timber and offcuts that may be needed. Also my main workbench is like Einstein's desk, lots of bits and pieces of various projects on the go.

At times it's easier to use the TS & routertable as workbenches. :oo:

But any area close to machinery and tools gets cleaned daily before I start in the morning. Not only does it protect all the expensive tools but also I feel it's necessary from an safety aspect. Especially as my daughter often uses the workshop as well.


Peter.

Sturdee
4th Jan 2010, 01:39 PM
Peter that takes me back 5 years, stayed the night at Cranbrook, and then on to Lang Lang.

Is it that long ago already John that you had a look at my shop. Remember the area I was making a sanding box for at the time ? That now ended up as the turning section.

BTW your workshop photo's spurred me into taking these pics. Looking forward to seeing your final photo's, I'll suppose we'll have to wait until you get better weather.


Peter.

Sturdee
4th Jan 2010, 01:44 PM
I got the same model 8 years ago and the only thing I've had to replace is the Pulley Belt.
Cheers Tony.:2tsup:

and


You may find it helpful to raise it from the bench for fingertip access to the adjusting nuts for the banjo and the tailstock; they can loosen from vibration. The bed is strong enough to span between supports. Some additional floor mats could compensate for the increased height, if it becomes uncomfortable.

Cheers,
Joe

I like it too but I still want to make a hand wheel to screw on the spindle together with a spindle extension.

I have so far been able to adjust the nuts holding the banjo and tailstock but I'm thinking of drilling a hole through the bench so that I can adjust them with a long extension ratchet spanner from underneath.


Peter.

jow104
4th Jan 2010, 06:20 PM
Is it that long ago already John that you had a look at my shop. Remember the area I was making a sanding box for at the time ? That now ended up as the turning section.

BTW your workshop photo's spurred me into taking these pics. Looking forward to seeing your final photo's, I'll suppose we'll have to wait until you get better weather.


Peter.

Yep, minus 3C this morning and I have only been out of the house once for 10 minutes in the last 7 days. Another two weeks forecast.
Daren't start any machinery up, the rubber belts are most probably like steel tyres.

joe greiner
4th Jan 2010, 11:49 PM
and



I like it too but I still want to make a hand wheel to screw on the spindle together with a spindle extension.

I have so far been able to adjust the nuts holding the banjo and tailstock but I'm thinking of drilling a hole through the bench so that I can adjust them with a long extension ratchet spanner from underneath.


Peter.
That way could be simpler, I reckon. But they only need to be finger tight, with the locking handles at mid-range; just use the socket and extension bar like a screwdriver or nut driver. Massage to your liking.

Several holes could provide multiple locations. The banjo and tailstock will almost always be in the wrong locations.:-

Cheers,
Joe

Tornatus
5th Jan 2010, 12:11 AM
I have so far been able to adjust the nuts holding the banjo and tailstock but I'm thinking of drilling a hole through the bench so that I can adjust them with a long extension ratchet spanner from underneath.
Peter.

G'day Peter

Came to this thread late, but here's a tip from an old MC900 owner - save yourself a lot of stuffing around and get hold of a couple of NYLOC nuts to replace the ones on your banjo and tailstock locking shafts. Once adjusted to the right tension, they should never shift under normal use, and you won't have to worry about special access from underneath.

Sturdee
5th Jan 2010, 09:50 AM
G'day Peter

Came to this thread late, but here's a tip from an old MC900 owner - save yourself a lot of stuffing around and get hold of a couple of NYLOC nuts to replace the ones on your banjo and tailstock locking shafts. Once adjusted to the right tension, they should never shift under normal use, and you won't have to worry about special access from underneath.

:2tsup:

A better solution. Anymore good ideas are always welcome.


Peter.

joe greiner
5th Jan 2010, 11:18 PM
G'day Peter

Came to this thread late, but here's a tip from an old MC900 owner - save yourself a lot of stuffing around and get hold of a couple of NYLOC nuts to replace the ones on your banjo and tailstock locking shafts. Once adjusted to the right tension, they should never shift under normal use, and you won't have to worry about special access from underneath.

I agree with Peter. But easier said than done. Manual indicates M18 (prob. x 1.5). Metric and NYLOC is a double whammy around here, and my only likely supplier may only have bulk packs. Worth a try for 2x, though. Thanks.:2tsup:

Actually, the bulk pack might not be so bad. Some other members of my WT club have that lathe, and I have two of them - one mothballed for now.

Cheers,
Joe

Evan Pavlidis
6th Jan 2010, 04:33 AM
Very neat setup Pete :2tsup:....very comfortable surrounds to work in.

I've just finished re-organising everything in my garage and what a huge difference it has made...no more clutter, more room for storage and easier to work and move around instead of shifting boxes to find something in another box.


Cheears, Evan

Sturdee
28th Nov 2010, 03:57 PM
It is now nearly a year since I posted details of the area of my workshop set aside for turning.

Much has happened, lots of things learned and of course the turning workshop has improved a little so that an updated picture show might be of interest to some.

So here are some pics, taken from left to right.

Photo 1 shows the part dividing wall on the left with a room filter on top and a quick removable notice board covering the output side of the thicknesser.

Photo 2 shows the left hand corner with the taller tools,

Photo 3 - 5 show the wall behind the lathe, note the old drill converted into a power sander. The lights, the air compressor, dust collector and vacuum cleaner outlet ( connected to a vacuum cleaner and Sturdee mini cyclone on the other side of the wall) are all switchable from here.

Photo 6 & 8 show the right hand side and photos 8 & 9 show the bench at the rear.



Peter.

Sturdee
28th Nov 2010, 04:06 PM
Photos 1 & 2 show the underside below the benches and now have all drawers to store the bits and pieces.


Photo 3 shows the floor cleaning wand, made from an old garden blower/sucker with is just slipped onto to the DC hose

Photo 4 shows the hand held wand for general cleaning.

Photo 5 shows the vacuum cleaning hose attached to the little pipe connected through the wall to the mini cyclone.


Whilst the area is small, too small for more than 2 persons working in i, it suits me fine.

Temperature is consistently nice even in hot summers and during the winter the little bar radiator is only used for a half hour to take the chill of.


Peter.

rsser
28th Nov 2010, 04:09 PM
Good grief!

Clean, organised, tidy!!

You put us to shame Piet.

wheelinround
28th Nov 2010, 04:20 PM
Peter like the little drill and its extension behind the lathe ideal for many uses :2tsup:

As always clinic clean not so much Orange as I recall :;

Sturdee
28th Nov 2010, 04:35 PM
Peter like the little drill and its extension behind the lathe ideal for many uses :2tsup:

As always clinic clean not so much Orange as I recall :;

That old drill sat under the house for about 5 years before it found it's new home, had to shorten the pillar shaft to fit it in and it's switched on/of from the red switch in front of the lathe.

The floor is clean because of the efficient cleaning system. Only takes a few minutes to clean the floor and behind the lathe.


Peter.

Sturdee
28th Nov 2010, 04:36 PM
Good grief!

Clean, organised, tidy!!

You put us to shame Piet.

Ern, did you notice the cleaning wand, it is based on CT one that you got recently.


Peter.

rsser
28th Nov 2010, 05:09 PM
Yes.

With a few clean-ups I think the CT unit needs better connectors.

The clear plakky tube works OK with my 10cm quick fit but the hand wand needs some mods.

It's still streets ahead of the cruddy kit sweep though.

I've bought 10 new plakky bags for the dusty so the ankle-deep shavings that come off the lathe will go down the tube. No more pan-and-brush mucking around! We have a near total loss business to run :C

artme
28th Nov 2010, 05:57 PM
Beautiful set up Peter!! :):):)An example for the rest of us.:D

Sturdee
28th Nov 2010, 06:25 PM
Thanks, over the holidays I will have to convert my daughters garage to something similar :oo: she wants exactly the same, including all the tool racks.

Already been scrounging insulation materials, framing stuff and now only need some mdf for the ceiling and about 20 old doors for the walls. Eagerly looking forward to the Christmas hard rubbish collections to get these materials.


Peter.

Groggy
28th Nov 2010, 07:03 PM
Gives me a guilty smile every time I see your shop Peter :D

Al B
28th Nov 2010, 07:56 PM
WOW Peter, Great workshop mate, :2tsup:

Sawdust Maker
29th Nov 2010, 09:06 AM
Still looking good
looks like you treated yourself to a couple of Hughie's creations :2tsup:


I didn't notice earlier your dust modification to the thicknesser. Looks to be the same one that I have. How did you do the modification and does it work?

munruben
29th Nov 2010, 10:10 AM
Wow, got to take my hat off to you Peter, everything so neat and tidy. Great workshop.
Do you always turn your lathe off while at top speed? I was told not to do that so always turn it down to lowest speed.
Thanks for sharing the pics with us. might give me the inspiration I need to do something about my own work area.

Allan at Wallan
29th Nov 2010, 10:51 AM
Nice setup Peter but tools and equipment
are of no use unless you have wood ... can't see any:?

Allan

letzzzgo
29th Nov 2010, 05:22 PM
Peter, I can see why you haven't had time to get stuck into that piece of 'black wattle', Ern gave you. You have been a busy boy ...very impressive !!! :wink:

Cheers, John

Sturdee
30th Nov 2010, 04:21 PM
Still looking good
looks like you treated yourself to a couple of Hughie's creations :2tsup:


I didn't notice earlier your dust modification to the thicknesser. Looks to be the same one that I have. How did you do the modification and does it work?

Yes, I got a set.

For the dust modification I open up the back part and added a 3" gal drain pipe section ( cut open to suit) with self tappers and tape.

Attached are some photos that should make it clear. Works much better than the original that kept getting blocked up and had not enough suction.

Peter.

Sturdee
30th Nov 2010, 04:24 PM
Do you always turn your lathe off while at top speed? I was told not to do that so always turn it down to lowest speed.


Yes, don't think it makes any difference, but I'll move it to the slowest speed before I mount something that's unbalanced.


Peter.

Sturdee
30th Nov 2010, 04:26 PM
Nice setup Peter but tools and equipment
are of no use unless you have wood ... can't see any:?

Allan

Allan, wood is stored everywhere else. :(( I've got some in the garage, in one shed, in the other parts of the workshop, in the garden and in the dedicated storage area that i'm building.


Peter.

Sturdee
30th Nov 2010, 04:27 PM
Peter, I can see why you haven't had time to get stuck into that piece of 'black wattle', Ern gave you. You have been a busy boy ...very impressive !!! :wink:

Cheers, John

Yes, I hope to get at that after Christmas, when I can concentrate on turning again.


Peter.

Sawdust Maker
30th Nov 2010, 09:32 PM
Yes, I got a set.

For the dust modification I open up the back part and added a 3" gal drain pipe section ( cut open to suit) with self tappers and tape.

Attached are some photos that should make it clear. Works much better than the original that kept getting blocked up and had not enough suction.

Peter.

Peter

Thanks heaps for the photos
I've now a better idea then what I was going to do

interesting, my thicknesser doesn't have any dust pickup at all, shall be rectified shortly, thanks