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as_is
26th Aug 2004, 08:25 AM
I am having problems with a woodcut bowlsaver. Used it twice following the recommended procedures and on both occasions I experienced dig-ins causing the tool to grab and yank the job off the chuck. Lathe speed was 300rpm and wood was Jacaranda. Any suggestions?
Thanks

Cliff Rogers
26th Aug 2004, 10:22 PM
G'day.

Go here... http://www.woodcut-tools.com/
& follow the links to contact them & ask for the demo video on CD.

In the mean time, speed up the lathe to around 500RPM &
slow down the feed rate. (of the tool)

Sprog
27th Aug 2004, 12:34 AM
And keep clearing the chips constantly

as_is
5th Sep 2004, 10:03 PM
G'day.

Go here... http://www.woodcut-tools.com/
& follow the links to contact them & ask for the demo video on CD.

In the mean time, speed up the lathe to around 500RPM &
slow down the feed rate. (of the tool)
Cliff,
I eventually received a reply from Woodcut and the reseller. No clear answer regarding calculating depth of cut or even grabbing but they refer back to the brochure and sugegst a method of holding via spigots. I also have the video CD which I viewed several times.
I have since slowed down the tool feed rate and hold the handle with both hands to prevent the tool from being dragged into the job thus jamming. I also deburred some of the edges of the tool which had plating dags and applied wax on the cutter. I will speed up the lathe next time. Thanks for the tip.
I have also worked out from geometric first principles the depth and bowl radius and produced a guide table.
Regards
Alec

as_is
5th Sep 2004, 10:12 PM
And keep clearing the chips constantly
I was aware of clearing the chips. Indeed I had a vacuum nozzle to suck out all the chips as the tool was cutting. I also withdrew the tool every 30 seconds and applied wax to the cutter and edge of the blade.
The job was held in a Bonham 130 chuck in expansion (rather than the recommended compression on a spigot). I stopped the job every minute to ensure the chuck was kept tight as I felt that the changing grain direction every 1/4 turn was causing the job to jerk which could eventually lead the chuck to loosen up.

Thanks
as_is

Mikko
9th Feb 2005, 10:56 PM
Sorry to bring up this old thread.....
How would you guys compare this to Kelton saver?
Also, it is not very clear to me how big of a centre this tool can save?
I saw 350mm and 400mm mentioned. Kelton seems to take 450mm out.

Most of all...does this system work OK?

Thanks,
Mikko

P.S. It is funny that most of the new and affordable tools come from OZ and NZ. My boosted Munro hollowing tool is on its way.....:cool:

rsser
11th Feb 2005, 10:44 PM
Bit of a reprise here Mikko.

Kelton (aka MacNaughton) is deemed to be a bit more flexible but also needing a bit more skill. And power - 1hp is possible with fiddling it appears but more is easier.

And email them in NZ about the required height between centre and top of banjo (eg. won't fit my Vicmarc 175).

And do a google ... there's lots out there. Also some on this forum.

Mikko
14th Feb 2005, 05:39 AM
Thanks Ern. Problem is that there is VERY little on the Woodcut saver anywhere (including this forum).
I have done lost of digging, but not much has come up.

Kelton is well documented....comparisons between these two are not to be found.

Cheers,
Mikko

Jim Carroll
14th Feb 2005, 07:56 AM
Mikko try this link
Lyn has a lot of comparisons with these tools and a whole range of others. woodturning items
http://www.fholder.com/Woodturning/lyn.html
A lot to read but worthwhile
Regards Jim

rsser
14th Feb 2005, 03:50 PM
Good idea Jim.

Mikko FWIW I wouldn't bother with the Woodcut. As far as I know you're stuck with one radius.

But the Kelton is an expensive proposition to buy; would only pay for itself if you were churning the bowls out for sale.

If you were of an inventive frame of mind, you could make your own 'lance' with a HSS or carbide tip. Would only give you a cone tho.

Overall tho coring limits the shape you can get out of your blanks. I don't esp. like even just roughing out green bowls for this reason.

Mikko
14th Feb 2005, 06:52 PM
Thanks Jim and Ern,

I think I'll get Kelton later on....Woodcut does not seem like worth the hassle.
I have some monsterous pieces for "flame" birch drying, and sure with to make most of them....in few years time that is.

This Lyn dude sure has some excellent articles there.

Thanks again guys.

Cheers,
Mikko

rsser
14th Feb 2005, 08:16 PM
Cool.

Yeah, Lyn is a one-off. You get the concentrated wisdom on the site that Jim lists ... but do a google on rec.crafts.woodturning

Lots there too.

So what's flame birch?

Mikko
14th Feb 2005, 09:52 PM
It's a name used for special wavy pattern sometimes found near the root of old specimens of common birch. Oiling the surface after work is completed brings this out very nicely.

I scored few tons of this type of timber and wish to make most of it. Largest pieces allow making bowls up to 90cm in dia.. Need to get that VB lathe before even dreaming about turning them.

I also got few nice burls from those very same trees.:D

Cheers,
Mikko

rsser
14th Feb 2005, 10:45 PM
Thought so :)

Have turned some myself ... supposedly silver birch.

Pretty stable, certainly for rough turning .. and even for finish turning while green (in one session of course).

My 1st teacher recommended letting yoghurt go green, then painted it onto the blank, wrapping in plastic and leaving to spalt.

Got some fair results ... think the gunk wasn't mouldy enuff.

Have heard another option is to place end grain of log on mouldy leaves for a while, keeping moist.

Great to have so much to play with ;-}

Mikko
14th Feb 2005, 11:02 PM
Yup...I have few hundred kilos of this stuff spalting in pile of fallen leaves.
The best bits with heavy flaming are not there...naturally, but the bits further up are sweet for this purpose. I'm a believer in letting nature have its way....in spalting too.
Turning a lump of wood that has been covered with moldy yoghurt does not sound too appealing to me. :eek:
I also think that the nicest palting patterns are created by the "wild" fungus species found in these piles of leaves. I do not know too much about this really...just tend to use what looks good.

Cheers,
Mikko