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ozhunter
25th Jan 2010, 06:39 PM
As you may have seen, I am now in possession of a Woodfast M908.

I know very little about these things (give me time) and given that a manuals are as scarce as rocking horse poo, I have a few questions for the knowledgeable among us.

My lathe came with several chucks and odds and ends.

Image 1 shows one of two chucks I have that are very similar.

What are they called?

Images 2,3 and 4 depict what I have deduced go in the previously mentioned chuck.

What is the procedure to assemble the chucks using these critters, and what are they used for?

I have worked out that the item in Image 5 fits inside the chuck in Image 1, there are two of these and they only fit one chuck each.

What are they called and what is their purpose?

Thanks

Adam

ozhunter
25th Jan 2010, 06:46 PM
Image 1 in this post depicts what I think is called a face plate ??

How do you use one of these?

Images 2 and 3, what are they and how do I use them?

Lastly for now, I understand that the No. 2 Morse Taper drill chuck goes in the tail stock?? How do I get the centre that is in the tail stock out to put the drill chuck in?

Thank you for your patience and knowledge

woodwork wally
25th Jan 2010, 09:12 PM
Gidday and welcome to the forum 1 Buy a book on woodturning 2. Join a club ASAP 3 join a library and borrow books Now down to the piccies

Top left Faceplate is screwed on to a piece of wood That has been flattened one face and mounted in chuck Use tail stock live centre as a steady till your wood is in balance

Next top right is a spurred drive and is used in spindle turning Wood is between the spur and live centre

bottom this also will fit into chuck and is used as a single screw holding wood and my main use is for small bowls and medium goblet while turning the majority of outside but has many other uses but is only used where either the hole will evetually be turned out or covered I do not have a chuck like yours but it is possible that a hand book could be available if we knew the brand
You have bought reasonable quality as an entry level
Oh yes the live centre is removed by winding the tailstock handle anticlockwise untill the live centre becomes free If the tailstock is hollow you could also just use the rod [which you should have got with the lathe] to tap it out Trust this helps you to some extent Cheers ww.Wally

Ozkaban
25th Jan 2010, 09:15 PM
Can't help much on post 1.

Post 2. The faceplate should screw onto the outside of the spindle. If you put small-ish screws through the holes into a bowl blank, you can turn the outside of the bowl with a foot for a chuck) before turning it around mounting the bowl onto the chuck, removing the screws and turning the inside of the bowl. somebody else can probably explain this one better :rolleyes:

#2 is a spur drive. It's probably a mores taper #2, and slides into the head stock, much like the live centre will go into the tail stock. If you mark the centres on a spindle blank, you can mount the blank between the two and the spur drive will grip and turn the blank. Don't hit it with a chisel (leave a cm or so at each end). It hurts, and the chisel wont thank you either.

#3 is a wood screw. usually it would be gripped in a chuck. You drill a hole into the centre of your bowl blank about the depth of the screw and about the diamater of the shaft of the screw (ie, without including the teeth of the screw in the measurement). Then you can screw the bowl blank onto the woodscrew until the bowl blank is touching the chuck (giving it some support), and proceed as per the faceplate. Much quicker and easier than the faceplate, but beware, if you get a catch you will most likely turn the blank on the screw, causing it to strip the thread, resulting in you reverting to the faceplate :rolleyes:

Cheers,
Dave

Ozkaban
25th Jan 2010, 09:18 PM
and your last question - there are usually 2 ways. On my MC1100, if you wind the tailstockl spindle all the way out, there is some gizmo in there that ejects the morese taper insert. Or there should be a hole right through it through which you can poke something in to get it out.

Sawdust Maker
25th Jan 2010, 09:41 PM
and your last question - there are usually 2 ways. On my MC1100, if you wind the tailstockl spindle all the way out, there is some gizmo in there that ejects the morese taper insert. Or there should be a hole right through it through which you can poke something in to get it out.

If you didn't get a knock out bar with the lathe - work out the correct size and get a piece of steel rod to that diameter. The knockout bar is what you feed through the headstock or tailstock to knock out whatever you've got in there ie a drive dog, anything else with a morse taper 2, dead centre etc

On your first post, sorry I have no idea about those chucks - If you have the name of them there might be someone who has a manual or can help

WWWally gave good advice - check out your local library they might have books on turning - my local even has a couple of DVDs

good luck

wheelinround
25th Jan 2010, 09:45 PM
This the one you bought WOODFAST M908 WOOD LATHE - eBay Equipment, Machinery, Metalworking, Metalworking, Woodworking, Business, Industrial. (end time 22-Jan-10 21:09:51 AEDST) (http://cgi.ebay.com.au/WOODFAST-M908-WOOD-LATHE_W0QQitemZ330396065067QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU_BnI_Woodworking_Metalworking?hash=item4ced23dd2b)

ozhunter
25th Jan 2010, 09:47 PM
Thanks for the replies folks.

I intend to go through all the knowledge gaining avenues mentioned above, but I would like to know what the chucks are called so I can do some research without stabbing in the dark.

Adam

ozhunter
25th Jan 2010, 09:50 PM
This the one you bought

Yes, wheelin, that's the one.

ozhunter
25th Jan 2010, 09:56 PM
1 Buy a book on woodturning

Saves me starting another thread. What are some recommendations for books and DVD's that I can purchase to help me be less of a dummy.



Join a club ASAP

Does anyone know of a club in the Central West of NSW. Can't find too much information so far, just a a disconnected phone number

hughie
25th Jan 2010, 09:57 PM
Image 1 shows one of two chucks I have that are very similar.




Images 2,3 and 4 depict what I have deduced go in the previously mentioned chuck.
What is the procedure to assemble the chucks using these critters, and what are they used for?
I have worked out that the item in Image 5 fits inside the chuck in Image 1, there are two of these and they only fit one chuck each.


I would say from the pics you have the remains of a Leady expansion chuck with some but missing. It was designed to be used in High Schools by Bruce Leadbettter.
If not a Leady then perhaps one similar, there was one made in the UK some years ago but I cant recall by whom.

China
26th Jan 2010, 12:21 AM
Could be a Woodfast super chuck, it's been along time since I've seen or used one, I am going to Woodfast on Wednesday I will see if I can pick some ones brains

TTIT
26th Jan 2010, 12:26 AM
Looks like a collet chuck to me :shrug: . The main drawback with them is that the spigot you turn to grip on must be fairly accurately sized - but they are quick and hold on like . . . . . . well you get the idea :B. My old man used to make his own until they invented scroll chucks - he swore by collet chucks for holding goblet blanks :2tsup: - but then he just swore for no particular reason at all too :U

ozhunter
26th Jan 2010, 08:16 AM
Could be a Woodfast super chuck, it's been along time since I've seen or used one, I am going to Woodfast on Wednesday I will see if I can pick some ones brains

Thanks China, much appreciated

jefferson
26th Jan 2010, 09:02 AM
Saves me starting another thread. What are some recommendations for books and DVD's that I can purchase to help me be less of a dummy.

I've got quite a collection of books and DVDs I always share around. R. Raffan, M. Darlow to name a few. Just PM me with your address etc and please send them back.

One good book I can't send you is the Rowley one (I think, Fundamentals of Wood Turning). I still have 's copy on loan and you should buy it before probably any other. IMHO.

EX's Timber
26th Jan 2010, 09:30 AM
One good book I can't send you is the Rowley one (I think, Fundamentals of Wood Turning). I still have 's copy on loan and you should buy it before probably any other. IMHO.

Fundamentals of Wood Turning is by Darlow
(http://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-Woodturning-Darlows/dp/1565233557)
Think you might've meant Woodturning: A Foundation Course: Amazon.co.uk: Keith Rowley: Books

Ross
26th Jan 2010, 09:32 AM
Also try Introduction to Woodturning (http://www.turningtools.co.uk/wtintro/wtintro.html) download it for free.

Ross

Ozkaban
26th Jan 2010, 09:53 AM
I have a copy of the Darlow book that I'm happy to sell to you if you wish. I think I bought it of a forumite when I first started... I'd be happy with $25 plus postage if interested. The book new is $50 from carbatec (http://www.carbatec.com.au/fundamentals-of-woodturning-mike-darlow_c20627)

Cheers,
Dave

jefferson
26th Jan 2010, 09:54 AM
Fundamentals of Wood Turning is by Darlow
(http://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-Woodturning-Darlows/dp/1565233557)
Think you might've meant Woodturning: A Foundation Course: Amazon.co.uk: Keith Rowley: Books (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Woodturning-Foundation-Course-Keith-Rowley/dp/0946819203/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264458424&sr=1-5)

Oops. sorry DJ. I've been down to the shed and have the Rowley book next to me. A Foundation Course it is. And it is a ripper. How much do you want for it, ?

woodwork wally
26th Jan 2010, 12:13 PM
Saves me starting another thread. What are some recommendations for books and DVD's that I can purchase to help me be less of a dummy.

Gidday again Books or dvds by Richard Raffin Mike Darlow Dale Nish Carol Rix
Gordon Stokes Rowland Seale are all ones that I have begged borrowed or aquired
with financial exchange and are all good info and well worn in my library Most were purchased on Ebay [Often for a pittance] Just remember Introduce you skew or gouge to the tool rest before the timber or it will be put there with a helluva shock:~:~ and then have the bevel rubbing:2tsup: and introduce the sharp [read cutting] edge gently . also watch the forum for any turnarounds in your area cos the members will help you . you may even find a member in you area who is prepared to give some guidance cheers WW.Wally

ozhunter
26th Jan 2010, 08:42 PM
The generosity of the forumites has astounded me once again. Thank You everyone.

I've not long walked in the door. I will get back to each of you after some sustenance is taken on board.

As a BTW I had a look at 4 jaw scroll chucks at breakfast this morning, only the ones on the Timbecon website. I think it is worth considering purchasing one. If nothing else it will add a bit of appeal to lathe if I ever decide to off load it.

wheelinround
26th Jan 2010, 08:48 PM
The generosity of the forumites has astounded me once again. Thank You everyone.

I've not long walked in the door. I will get back to each of you after some sustenance is taken on board.

As a BTW I had a look at 4 jaw scroll chucks at breakfast this morning, only the ones on the Timbecon website. I think it is worth considering purchasing one. If nothing else it will add a bit of appeal to lathe if I ever decide to off load it.

Look closer to home H&F Carba-tec Gary Pye Jim Carrol McJings

ozhunter
26th Jan 2010, 09:23 PM
I've got quite a collection of books and DVDs I always share around. R. Raffan, M. Darlow to name a few. Just PM me with your address etc and please send them back.

One good book I can't send you is the Rowley one (I think, Fundamentals of Wood Turning). I still have 's copy on loan and you should buy it before probably any other. IMHO.

PM sent jefferson. Thanks

ozhunter
26th Jan 2010, 09:25 PM
Also try Introduction to Woodturning (http://www.turningtools.co.uk/wtintro/wtintro.html) download it for free.

Ross

Thanks Ross.

ozhunter
26th Jan 2010, 09:31 PM
I have a copy of the Darlow book that I'm happy to sell to you if you wish. I think I bought it of a forumite when I first started... I'd be happy with $25 plus postage if interested. The book new is $50 from carbatec (http://www.carbatec.com.au/fundamentals-of-woodturning-mike-darlow_c20627)

Cheers,
Dave

PM sent Dave. Thanks

ozhunter
26th Jan 2010, 09:34 PM
Gidday again Books or dvds by Richard Raffin Mike Darlow Dale Nish Carol Rix
Gordon Stokes Rowland Seale are all ones that I have begged borrowed or aquired
with financial exchange and are all good info and well worn in my library Most were purchased on Ebay [Often for a pittance] Just remember Introduce you skew or gouge to the tool rest before the timber or it will be put there with a helluva shock:~:~ and then have the bevel rubbing:2tsup: and introduce the sharp [read cutting] edge gently . also watch the forum for any turnarounds in your area cos the members will help you . you may even find a member in you area who is prepared to give some guidance cheers WW.Wally


Thanks for the advise WWW. I'll have a look about for those authors.

Adam

colhu
26th Jan 2010, 10:04 PM
Hi Adam

going back to the question of what chucks you have got, I notice there's a contact name and phone number in the eBay ad - why don't you ring Roy and ask him about them, now that you know a bit more about it from your new forum mates.

cheers, Colin

ozhunter
26th Jan 2010, 10:27 PM
Hi Adam

going back to the question of what chucks you have got, I notice there's a contact name and phone number in the eBay ad - why don't you ring Roy and ask him about them, now that you know a bit more about it from your new forum mates.

cheers, Colin

Thanks Colin

Trying to ring Roy was the first thing I did once I got the show home and set up, but he has fallen off the earth I think. He did mention going away to see his Grandkids but didn't say when. I'll keep trying.

Adam

RETIRED
27th Jan 2010, 07:14 AM
Oops. sorry DJ. I've been down to the shed and have the Rowley book next to me. A Foundation Course it is. And it is a ripper. How much do you want for it, ?


PM sent jefferson. ThanksYou can mail it to Ozhunter so he can read it and when done Oz can send it back to me. No hurry Oz.:cool:

China
29th Jan 2010, 09:17 PM
ozhunter, I went to Woodfast it it almost certainly is a leadbetter/Woodfast super chuck, Woodfast manufactured these for bruce Leadbetter under a royalty type arangement, they sugested you email the above pics to them and the may be able to help with what you require although it is not a certainty

ozhunter
30th Jan 2010, 11:07 AM
Thankyou China.

I will send the pics later today.

Much appreciated

Adam

stuffy
30th Jan 2010, 09:24 PM
I used to have a multistar duplex chuck similar in design to the one shown. It's a bit hard to describe how to assemble the bits coz some are for expansion mode and some are for contraction mode, but I'll give it a go.

Pic 1 shows the main body pieces, inner (left) screws on to lathe spindle. Outer ring screws on to inner piece, but first some assembly is required.
Take the inner piece and fit the cone with spigot ( pic 5) in to it spigot end first.
Take the expansion jaws (pic2) and put them individually in the outer ring so that the angled rim is on the outside and the straight rim is on the inside. This is a bit fiddly from memory and there may be some numbers on the jaws that show which order they go in for precise allignment.
If you've got this far you'll see that by screwing the outer ring with jaws on to the inner chuck body with cone fitted the jaws will expand enough to grip a recess in bowl or whatever.
That'll keep you scratchin' your head long enough for now. The other parts are for contraction mode like a collet chuck which will hold the screw chuck or other similar diameter pieces.

Feel free to ask again if you're stuck. After reccomending the lathe i feel responsible for feeding your turning addiction.

Steve
:)

ozhunter
30th Jan 2010, 10:45 PM
After recommending the lathe i feel responsible for feeding your turning addiction.

LOL stuffy.

I was stumped with the cone, following your description, I imagine it should look like Pic 1, with an appropriated sized dovetail turned in the piece for the jaws to expand into.

I sat down and played about with the chucks and worked out the contraction mode, part of it anyway. I can get it to hold a blank pretty well and even turn the outside of a goblet like in Pic 2, but as soon as I try to do anything with the inside, the tiniest catch or pressure pulls it off centre or out of the chuck all together. I'm sure this is because I am not doing it right.

Is there a better timber to practice on.

Someone said get instruction ASAP and I'm going to do that. Trend Timbers in Richmond have weekend beginner classes (has anyone done any of their courses). I have spent a lot of time looking at stuff on the net, and every one of them does things differently. I need to get the basics from a single source and then develop my own style from that instruction and the books and DVD's that the forumites have so graciously showered me with.

I'll get there eventually.

Adam

stuffy
31st Jan 2010, 12:52 AM
Pic 1 looks right. As someone said you don't get a large range of movement with this type of chuck so a dovetail recess has to be fairly accurate. Also the jaws don't protrude far so the blank needs a flat bottom around the outside of the recess so it can sit flat on the outer ring of the chuck, and a smidgeon of clearance in front of the jaws in the recess to allow the jaws to expand.
This is the opposite to a scroll chuck where the jaws are best seated flush against the back of a flat dovetailed recess with some clearance between the base of the blank and the chuck.
All this is confusing you unnecessarily, it'll make sense as you learn more.
Suffice to say a scroll chuck is way easier to use, but don't get rid of the others you can have them set up for special jigs etc.

You've started at the deep end a bit with goblets. Hollowing end grain is not the easiest at the best of times and pine isn't the best timber to hollow. If you really have to try hollowing end grain why not start with some egg cups in a hardwood species thats not too dense?

That said you're doin' fine so far, have fun with it!

:D
steve

ozhunter
3rd Feb 2010, 11:34 PM
ozhunter, I went to Woodfast it it almost certainly is a leadbetter/Woodfast super chuck,

Received an email back from Woodfast:no: They say it's not a Woodfast. It would be nice to know what breed they are, but I've doing some playing and with tight tolerances I can use them and will continue to.

I am still toying with the idea of acquiring a scroll chuck.

Cheers

Adam

Ozkaban
4th Feb 2010, 10:28 AM
The vicmarc I just bought came with a Nova chuck and a pile of shiny silver bits (love shiny silver bits!).

Anyway, my brother who came over to help me lug the lathe into position played with them for a while and a Woodfast superchuck came out of the pile. It looks a little different from the pics you've posted, though it seems to work on a very similar principle. I'll take some photos tonight and post them if I remember to do so.

cheers,
Dave

Sawdust Maker
4th Feb 2010, 03:45 PM
I've done a couple of the Trend weekend turn lessons as taught by John Ewart
He seems to know what he's on about. I need the refresher as I don't do enough and then bad habits develop

Might go up north and do one of his weekly one on one's
or go down south and do one with
or
Must convince SWMBO first and she doesn't like me out of the house :cool:<o></o>

Ozkaban
4th Feb 2010, 03:54 PM
I've done a couple of the Trend weekend turn lessons as taught by John Ewart
He seems to know what he's on about. I need the refresher as I don't do enough and then bad habits develop

I've done one of his courses too and he's a great teacher. I think he still teaches at Trend but also has his own classroom somewhere up near coffs harbour. I could be wrong about trend though.



Must convince SWMBO first and she doesn't like me out of the house :cool:<o></o>

I don't get that. mad if you're there, mad if you're gone, mad if you spend all day in the shed and traipse shavings through the house :whatonearth:

Cheers,
Dave

wheelinround
4th Feb 2010, 04:05 PM
<table class="desbody" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" class="body" align="left" height="44" valign="top">Bathurst Woodturning Centre</td> <td class="body"> </td> <td class="body" align="left" valign="top">11 Bant Street, Bathurst NSW 2705
Tel (02) 6332 2706 Fax (02) 6332 3474</td></tr></tbody></table>

Paul39
6th Feb 2010, 09:20 AM
Someone said get instruction ASAP and I'm going to do that. Trend Timbers in Richmond have weekend beginner classes (has anyone done any of their courses). I have spent a lot of time looking at stuff on the net, and every one of them does things differently. I need to get the basics from a single source and then develop my own style from that instruction and the books and DVD's that the forumites have so graciously showered me with. Adam

You have the right attitude. Once you have the basics, keep turning and paying attention to what you do with the tool and what happens to the wood.

There is no one way to make a turning, you have to find what works best for you.

Welcome to the addiction.

orraloon
6th Feb 2010, 09:56 AM
It works the same as a Leadbetter chuck but looks different to mine. As for the recess there is a cutter to mount in the tailstock comes with the Leadbetter so sizing is taken care of. Record make a similar chuck also.
Regards
John