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Ed Reiss
3rd Feb 2010, 06:30 AM
Buy WoodRiver Diamond Grinding Wheel 8" 120grit at Woodcraft.com (http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2021136/25960/WoodRiver-Diamond-Grinding-Wheel-8-120grit.aspx)

Gil Jones
3rd Feb 2010, 06:55 AM
You may want to test your grinder shaft(s) first, 'cause if they are not perfectly true, there is no way for you to true that diamond wheel.
Pass.
Gil

rsser
3rd Feb 2010, 07:36 AM
Is anything harder than diamond?

Ed Reiss
3rd Feb 2010, 08:50 AM
Good point Gil...not to mention that just that one wheel approaches the price of a half-way decent grinder. :o

TTIT
3rd Feb 2010, 09:11 AM
Veritas or someone in the US makes an adaptor for trueing up grinding wheels - combine that with this diamond wheel and you'd have a sweet set-up:2tsup:. I'd buy it if someone in Oz stocked 'em . . . . Jim???! . . . Dave???!

rsser
3rd Feb 2010, 09:28 AM
Have seen a balancer out there.

Ed Reiss
3rd Feb 2010, 12:28 PM
Oneway (Canada) makes the wheel balancer.

Allen Neighbors
3rd Feb 2010, 02:31 PM
Wonder how much tolerance in 'roundness' it has...
Can you imagine... a diamond truing device, trying to true up a diamond wheel? :oo: The fight's on!!!

Gil Jones
3rd Feb 2010, 05:25 PM
I doubt that the layer of industrial diamond on that aluminum disk (wheel) is thick enough to tolerate ANY truing action, and still exist.
If the diamond wheel costs $150 USD and is 120-grit, what is the difference in the finished tool when compared to a 120-grit aluminum oxide wheel costing $40 USD. AND, will the wood notice the difference (if there is any), as much as you notice the price? This is only my humble and somewhat frugal opinion.
Gil

China
3rd Feb 2010, 08:40 PM
I use a wheel very similar for sharpening surgical instruments only a lot finer grit, it is trued buy the use of a abrasive stick, not for out of round but but for square across the face. As Gil said above I think at that cost it the difference would not be enough to warrent it

Texian
4th Feb 2010, 05:35 AM
In another thread on another forum it was stated that diamond is good for sharpening carbide (of course) but not so good for steel. Possible issues mentioned were inability to "dress" and clean a diamond wheel when it developed a groove in the center, or became loaded up with steel. Am just repeating what I read elsewhere folks. A superior but very pricey alternative is reported to be cubic boron nitride.

Y'all just run on ahead without me, and I'll continue with my same old wheels that came on the grinder.

bowl-basher
4th Feb 2010, 07:45 AM
Y'all just run on ahead without me, and I'll continue with my same old wheels that came on the grinder.

Me to
the white 120# works ok plus the fact that SWMBO is just getting over the purchase of the new lathe:D:D
BB

rodent
6th Feb 2010, 03:45 AM
Is anything harder than diamond?
Some heads i've known .:D

brendan stemp
6th Feb 2010, 05:51 PM
I've ordered one so I will let you know what I think of it once I have taken it for a drive.

hughie
6th Feb 2010, 07:08 PM
I doubt that the layer of industrial diamond on that aluminum disk (wheel) is thick enough to tolerate ANY truing action, and still exist.
If the diamond wheel costs $150 USD and is 120-grit, what is the difference in the finished tool when compared to a 120-grit aluminum oxide wheel costing $40 USD. AND, will the wood notice the difference (if there is any), as much as you notice the price? This is only my humble and somewhat frugal opinion.Pretty much my experience and they generally run at slower speeds.Plus often the grit is 400 or 600 and its a final polish wheel ie ceramic cutters etc. If one wants to resharpen a ceramic cutter for wood then this is what you would use, anything else will shatter the edge.

Vern they are available via McJings in Sydney http://www.mcjing.com.au/categorybrowser.aspx?categoryid=202

Woodturnerjosh
6th Feb 2010, 08:49 PM
In another thread on another forum it was stated that diamond is good for sharpening carbide (of course) but not so good for steel. Possible issues mentioned were inability to "dress" and clean a diamond wheel when it developed a groove in the center, or became loaded up with steel. Am just repeating what I read elsewhere folks. A superior but very pricey alternative is reported to be cubic boron nitride.

Y'all just run on ahead without me, and I'll continue with my same old wheels that came on the grinder.

I do remember reading something similar to this in a Pferd abrasives catalogue. Something about the carbon in steel reacting with PCD (poly-crystalline-diamond) coatings. They also stated that CBN was the second hardest man-made abrasive and suited for grinding steel and other ferrous metals.