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View Full Version : F&E TCT cutters review preliminary findings



hughie
6th Feb 2010, 02:09 PM
first things first.

I set up the cutter in a Ezikut handle stainless pipe 20nb 320mm long. Shaft 14mm dia high tensile retractable in to the handle max length 320mm test length 180mm.The 180 was maintain through out the testing.

Several cutter heads were set at various angles to determine if a angle change would improve the cutting.

This was based on viewing Woodcuts cup cutter and a cup cutter that is available from McJings

Woodcut Tools Limited > Cup Hollowing Tool (with handle) (http://www.shop.woodcut-tools.com/product.php?xProd=97)


Lathe: Woodfast 400 circa 1987 with SN2 chuck, speed for the test 560rpm

Blank is a piece of pine soaked in 50/50 soap and water for three months dried in cardboard box for around 12 month and spent the last few months on the shelf in the garage. It includes several knots and a lot of end grain. dimensions 280mm dia and 100mm high

hughie
6th Feb 2010, 03:01 PM
The works better on a slight angle and will vary depending what part of the bowl is being turned.

Sweeping across the bottom you can flatten the angle out some, going up the sides gently increase the angle this will prevent catching. Side and rim cuts have about the same angle.

It can cut aggressively but its prone to catching and vibration or bounce. Where it does well is in the fine cuts and It will produce fine strings of shavings.Its easy to control with fine cuts although you do need a steady hand to produce and even finish. Its by no means idiot proof.

End grain on this blank was particularly bad and I had a hard time cleaning it up. At best it left a suede finish which would sand out fairly easily.

If its any consolation my Proforme did not do much better with this end grain and using a very sharp gouge with the finest of cuts had any measure of success.Note the knots etc.

Frank&Earnest
6th Feb 2010, 03:33 PM
Excellent documentation, hughie, thanks. Totally confirms my experience so far. As luck wants it, the angle of my cutters is different from all yours, in the middle between photo 3 and 4. Very good for hollowing, reasonable as a bowl gouge.

The photos show that you have gone to the trouble of rounding the head of the screw, like I did for the bigger ones but not for these ones. Do you consider it a substantial improvement?

Gil Jones
6th Feb 2010, 04:03 PM
Hey, Hughie, thanks for the nice writeup on an interesting tool.
Other than "Nominal Bore", what does "20nb" mean?
Cheers,
Gil

hughie
6th Feb 2010, 07:00 PM
F&E ,
Yes I reduced the screw head diameter to fit inside the csk of the cutter. The idea was to improve flow of the swarf.Improvement? Dunno, if nothing else its looks neater. :U Maybe on wet timber.

With my angles I did not find one that had any significant improvement. :no: mind you I choose a really bad scrappy piece of timber. But I wanted to see if I could produce a decent finish on a difficult specimen.

Gil, your correct with NB :2tsup:

I want to have a go at some green Norfolk pine and perhaps Narra/ Papua New Guinea Rose wood. Using one species does not do the cutter justice.All in all no surprises so far.

Sawdust Maker
6th Feb 2010, 09:39 PM
Hughie

The photos seem to show the same cutter ie no 1
did you try all and no appreciable difference?
in fact how would you present the last one?

hughie
6th Feb 2010, 10:40 PM
Tried them all but only continued with the one that worked for me. F&E had more success than me with his angled base set up.

Frank&Earnest
6th Feb 2010, 11:57 PM
F&E had more success than me with his angled base set up.

Or maybe I do not know any better. That's why I rely on experts' advice. :wink:

This is the first small hollowing job attempted. It is the bottom part of the needles box shown in another thread. Once drilled the pilot hole to depth, the hollower does its job working on the side (would be impossible with a gouge) and the three sided bedan trues the side and the bottom of the cylindrical cavity. The timber is silky oak, no challenges.

rsser
8th Feb 2010, 11:22 AM
Great test Hughie.

FWIW I've found NIP very easy to cut clean while green but a bear when fully dry - lots of tear-out.

hughie
8th Feb 2010, 10:24 PM
've found NIP very easy to cut clean while green but a bear when fully dry - lots of tear-out.

yeah me too :U, got some green Norfolk to have a go at, will put up the results




This is the first small hollowing job attempted. It is the bottom part of the needles box shown in another thread. Once drilled the pilot hole to depth, the hollower does its job working on the side (would be impossible with a gouge) and the three sided bedan trues the side and the bottom of the cylindrical cavity. The timber is silky oak, no challenges.


I reckon to would come into its own in this instance