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chowcini
1st Jul 2010, 09:16 PM
any one know where to buy a good 3 point steady ? Thanks in advance
Regards Chowcini

RETIRED
1st Jul 2010, 09:20 PM
Up your way, Vermec or Vicmark.

Calm
1st Jul 2010, 11:20 PM
Does this fit the job (https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=W378)

Cliff Rogers
1st Jul 2010, 11:34 PM
Vermec (http://www.vermec.com/)

http://vermec.tripod.com/PDFs/threepointsteady.pdf

WOODY70
2nd Jul 2010, 08:36 AM
any one know where to buy a good 3 point steady ? Thanks in advance
Regards Chowcini

www.woodworkingsuppliesqld.com.au (http://www.woodworkingsuppliesqld.com.au)

I will be at the Maryborough wood show next Saturday at the showgrounds if you would like one freight free.

Dave:2tsup:

Paul39
2nd Jul 2010, 10:32 AM
Does this fit the job (https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=W378)

That is a very good price for a three point steady.

Does someone have personal experience with it?

The good & bad of it?

Made for what center height?

Is it sold in the USA, and by whom?

Thanks.

rsser
2nd Jul 2010, 10:37 AM
Yes, don't forget to get the centre height right :wink:

Paul39
2nd Jul 2010, 11:07 AM
Yes, don't forget to get the centre height right :wink:

I am missing something about the above comment.

I have a South bend 10 inch metal lathe, 5 inch centre / center height. I found a 3 point steady for a South bend 16 inch, 8 inch centre / center height at a give away price thinking I could adapt it.

Does not adapt.

I have a Hegner 175 wood lathe that needs a steady. If the Hegner steady were available it would be made of platinum plated unobtainium, and priced accordingly.

It would be helpful to know if the rollers of the suggested steady converge near the 175mm centre / center height.

RETIRED
2nd Jul 2010, 11:27 AM
Paul. That is what Ern is saying.

Make sure that you get one that has the same centre height as your lathe as they are near impossible to adapt successfully.

Paul39
2nd Jul 2010, 11:43 AM
Paul. That is what Ern is saying.

Make sure that you get one that has the same centre height as your lathe as they are near impossible to adapt successfully.

Thanks, .

orraloon
2nd Jul 2010, 01:52 PM
There are plenty people on here made them with plywood or mdf and used skate wheels or door track rollers. Do a search of old posts. One other thing on my to do list.
Regards
John

rsser
2nd Jul 2010, 02:45 PM
Yeah, I've made one. Laminated 2 thicknesses of formwork ply for the ring; ply and roller blade wheels for the arms. Sitting on a block that's clamped to the bed with a long coach bolt and wingnut. Steel clamp plate.

As for height centre, it doesn't have to be exact because you can adjust the arms to some extent for a de facto centre, but each step of this sort reduces the OD of any piece you can run through it.

You also need to check the clamp plate width and thickness. The slot for them on DVR XPs for example is pretty squeezy.

joe greiner
2nd Jul 2010, 09:38 PM
A steady for a smaller height can be adapted to a greater height with a riser block and longer bolt, but not the other way 'round.

Cheers,
Joe

rsser
3rd Jul 2010, 07:12 PM
Good point Joe.

woodwork wally
3rd Jul 2010, 08:28 PM
Re[ has anyone used this from hare and forbes] They are basically made for the centre height of the mc1100 and mc900 lathes.. I have this and used it a number of times and it has done all I have wanted of it :U. I also have a home made wooden one with rollerblade wheels which also works fine on other jobs:2tsup: They are not rocket science cos it is you who sets it up either spot on:2tsup: or offcentre:oo: Preferrably the former. cheers and happy turning WWW

hughie
3rd Jul 2010, 10:26 PM
I have a home made one from round bar, not finished as yet. But its light and stiff, made in to concentric rings about 40mm apart and I will be using inline skate wheels for rollers.

As for the Vermec version,it would have to be the sturdiest one around. Strong enough to use on a metal turning lathe.

Bazza
4th Jul 2010, 11:19 AM
This site was posted some time ago and contains another version of a three point steady. If you go to the column to the left and scroll down to tools and tips. What do you think? Woodturning, Woodworking and Music with Herman de Vries (http://www.hdv.net/)

Barry