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MathewA
8th Nov 2004, 09:58 AM
Hi all

My name is Mathew Ashton. I presently live in Victoria BC Canada. I am in the final stages of emmigration to Australia. I should by this time next year be living in Maroochy shire Queensland. I have been debating whether I should bring my tools or not. I have a Oneway 2436 lathe with a ton of options. Are oneway lathes and parts available on the east coast of Aus? I'm wondering if it would be more practical to sell it and buy something down under. Got any thoughts on this

Thx Mat

Termite
8th Nov 2004, 10:21 AM
Australian voltage 240V AC 50Cycles

barryr
8th Nov 2004, 10:45 AM
unless you get clobbered by shipping fees I would probably keep it if it's a setup you like , a quick Aussie Google found almost no mention of this lathe , and then only in a user forum .

Bazz

rsser
8th Nov 2004, 11:34 AM
I'm not aware of a Oneway importer here, but you can always ship in parts from Canada. The exchange rate is close to 1:1 so add in shipping and you'd get some idea of cost.

The voltage issue should be looked into as Termite suggests; tho I've seen pictures of Oneways in the UK that uses 240 volts so it may be just a switch to throw if you're on US voltage settings.

smidsy
8th Nov 2004, 03:44 PM
Hei Mathew,
You might want to check the Australian suppliers and maybe even send them a pic of your beast as it is quite possible that it's marketed here under a different name.
Glad you found the forum.
Cheers
Paul
(posting as paulco on the newsgroup)

ptc
8th Nov 2004, 04:36 PM
bring your air con.
you will roast.
ptc

bitingmidge
8th Nov 2004, 05:56 PM
Who cares about the lathe??? The weather and beach is so terrific here (mostly) you'll never get round to finishing anything anyway.........

Bring it over...it'll make a nice talking piece in your shed, for when we all come over to listen to that cute way you speak .

:D :D :D

Cheers,

P

Little Festo
9th Nov 2004, 09:51 AM
Hello Matt,

You will need to see if it cost effective to bring the lathe over. We have locally made lathes that perform very well, Vicmarcs are manufactured just down the road from you at Redcliff (QLD) and are very nice lathes. www.vicmarc.com AND just over the water in New Zealand they make the Nova lathes.

Possibly the Vicmarc would be closest in build to the big Oneways.

All the best and hope you enjoy your stay in Auz, are you staying for good or just a while??

Peter

QldWoodie
9th Nov 2004, 12:09 PM
Hi Mat,

In the early 90's I lived in USA before returning to Australia. I had to pay for a full size container to bring my stuff home in 1996 so the extra cost of including stuff that I otherwise might have sold was not too expensive. By "stuff" I mean things like my 110V washing machine and 240V (2-phase American, not single phase Australian) dryer as well as 110V tools. Glad I did. I would have got peanuts for it if I sold it over there.

When you get here you might have to do some juggling with transformers and the like, even fitting new motors, but you'll be able to get started again much quicker using those "ton of options" already in your possession (that you'll also have to re-acquire expensively and time-consumingly if you buy new here). Even if you subsequently decide to reinvest in one of the excellent local lathes you probably won't regret bringing your existing one.

Maroochy is only an hour north of here, so when you get here why not PM me and I might be able to point you to some places who can help?

Qw

BTW: After 8 years back here my wife [not me] is still using our American clothes dryer which we converted to local current. And I have quite a lot of small tools running on 110V that I use with transformers still.

bitingmidge
9th Nov 2004, 12:46 PM
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
Oh no!!! The cute little monkey's been out with it's Red Crayon again!!

:D :D :D

Men are "NOT" Cute - bloody queenslanders.... :-) arnt you a old time yank ????

Sorry if I've caused offence, with yet another pathetic attempt at humour!!

Even if you aren't "Cute" Mat, you'll still be welcome round here, just don't go looking for snow!!!

BTW Zed "Queensland" is spelt with a capital "Q" which of course is what people are doing so they can come and live here ;) ....As for the yank question, well let's just say that's the unkindest cut of all! :eek:

Cheers,

P (Seppophobe)
:D :D :D

MathewA
9th Nov 2004, 02:38 PM
I talked to the makers of the electronic drive and they say it's auto sensing for NA and Euro/Aus power.




Australian voltage 240V AC 50Cycles

MathewA
9th Nov 2004, 02:39 PM
Thats what I'm hoping for



bring your air con.
you will roast.
ptc

MathewA
9th Nov 2004, 02:42 PM
You have no idea how much I needed to hear that! I'm starting to get freaked out by this idea of moving to the other side of earth.




Who cares about the lathe??? The weather and beach is so terrific here (mostly) you'll never get round to finishing anything anyway.........

Bring it over...it'll make a nice talking piece in your shed, for when we all come over to listen to that cute way you speak .

:D :D :D

Cheers,

P

MathewA
9th Nov 2004, 02:57 PM
Vicmark was my first choice when I was looking. The Oneway won out only because of the very limited suppliers of Vicmark in North America.

I hope to stay for good. My wife and I are holding off having kids until we get there.


Hello Matt,

You will need to see if it cost effective to bring the lathe over. We have locally made lathes that perform very well, Vicmarcs are manufactured just down the road from you at Redcliff (QLD) and are very nice lathes. www.vicmarc.com (http://www.vicmarc.com/) AND just over the water in New Zealand they make the Nova lathes.

Possibly the Vicmarc would be closest in build to the big Oneways.

All the best and hope you enjoy your stay in Auz, are you staying for good or just a while??

Peter

MathewA
9th Nov 2004, 03:01 PM
Now you've really got me thinking. I have somewhere around $30,000 worth of tools I was looking at selling cause of the power issue. I think I'm gonna have to rethink this idea. Can you spare a few moments and give me some details about how you over came the power issue.




Hi Mat,

In the early 90's I lived in USA before returning to Australia. I had to pay for a full size container to bring my stuff home in 1996 so the extra cost of including stuff that I otherwise might have sold was not too expensive. By "stuff" I mean things like my 110V washing machine and 240V (2-phase American, not single phase Australian) dryer as well as 110V tools. Glad I did. I would have got peanuts for it if I sold it over there.

When you get here you might have to do some juggling with transformers and the like, even fitting new motors, but you'll be able to get started again much quicker using those "ton of options" already in your possession (that you'll also have to re-acquire expensively and time-consumingly if you buy new here). Even if you subsequently decide to reinvest in one of the excellent local lathes you probably won't regret bringing your existing one.

Maroochy is only an hour north of here, so when you get here why not PM me and I might be able to point you to some places who can help?

Qw

BTW: After 8 years back here my wife [not me] is still using our American clothes dryer which we converted to local current. And I have quite a lot of small tools running on 110V that I use with transformers still.

MathewA
9th Nov 2004, 03:06 PM
Funny I never thought of the way Canadians speak was cute. I took off for a trip around the world a few years back. When I got home I thought we sounded more retarded than anything else.


Who cares about the lathe??? The weather and beach is so terrific here (mostly) you'll never get round to finishing anything anyway.........

Bring it over...it'll make a nice talking piece in your shed, for when we all come over to listen to that cute way you speak .

:D :D :D

Cheers,

P

MathewA
9th Nov 2004, 03:11 PM
No worries mate! By the way my wife says I've got a cute **** - could use some sun on it though.




:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
Oh no!!! The cute little monkey's been out with it's Red Crayon again!!

:D :D :D


Sorry if I've caused offence, with yet another pathetic attempt at humour!!

Even if you aren't "Cute" Mat, you'll still be welcome round here, just don't go looking for snow!!!

BTW Zed "Queensland" is spelt with a capital "Q" which of course is what people are doing so they can come and live here ;) ....As for the yank question, well let's just say that's the unkindest cut of all! :eek:

Cheers,

P (Seppophobe)
:D :D :D

bitingmidge
9th Nov 2004, 04:04 PM
No worries mate! By the way my wife says I've got a cute **** - could use some sun on it though. :eek: :eek: :eek:
Now that is SERIOUSLY too much information!

If I can help with info locally, send me a PM,

Cheers,

P

QldWoodie
9th Nov 2004, 04:57 PM
Here are some examples of what I did - not woodworking, but for most woodworking machinery the changeover to Australian elec supply would be much simpler than the 3 examples below:

American television and video player: American TV's won't work here because Australia is PAL system but we still brought ours back because we had dozens of videos (as in: childrens videos) which are dirt cheap in USA and our kids were still young enough then. Plug in a transformer and both worked. Seemingly not sensitive to 50Hz supply. We had to de-gauss the TV. About 2 years ago we gave the TV and video away to some friends who were moving to the USA.

Washing Machine: Purchased a heavy-duty 240V - 110V two-way transformer in USA before we moved (but you can buy them here). Washing machine worked OK but the stepping motor (that indexes it from wash to spin etc) wouldn't work - frequency sensitive. E-mailed manufacturer who told me of an identical one made by another supplier that was not frequency sensitive. E-mail them, bought one on credit card, arrived here within 5 days, worked thereafter flawlessly for another 6 years. Now it has been pensioned off I have another nice heavy duty transformer for my shop.

Clothes Dryer: I told this story previously. Lucky our local electrician, bored with doing ordinary things, took it on as a challenge. I think he charged me about $120. The motor part of the dryer is original 110V and runs through a transformer. The heating elements are changed over to 240V. Comfort statement of sorts: Australian tradepeople, or certainly the older generation who have been through our (then) comprehensive apprenticeship system, revel in such challenges. If you have problems it might take some time to find the right tradesperson, but (unlike, say, in America, where no such knowledgable service people exist outside of the factory) in Australia they are to be found.

Most woodworking equipment available here is also available in USA and sold in any case with 50Hz/240V motors so you should have no trouble buying such motors and installing them. Motors are cheap. I have a friend who owns/runs the biggest woodworking equipment supply place in Qld (Gregory Machinery) and if push comes to shove such modifications are commonplace for them and at reasonable cost.

For small gear (my jig saw, for example) runs well through a transformer as do things like chargers for cordless drills and any heat-type devices. Some are autosensing for voltage and all you have to do is replace the plug.

Sad tale: When I bought my (then) computer in USA I made sure it had a switch for 110V or 240V. On arrival I duly changed over the plug to the Australian style BUT forgot to change the switch on the back of the computer from 110 to 240. Plugged it in. Pfoof! Red face. New power supply. You don't win them all!

Qw

Darrell
9th Nov 2004, 10:27 PM
Hi Mathew

If you and your wife are holding off having kids until you arrive here
when are you going to find time to do any woodturning

Darrell

MathewA
10th Nov 2004, 12:40 PM
So if Im envisioning this correctly I can buy a transformer that will, easily itself, plug into any standard Aus outlet. Then I plug in my NA 110 volt drill and away I go. I have a Porter Cable 12" chopsaw, I think it draws 15 amps. Will the transformers handle the amp draw.

MathewA
10th Nov 2004, 12:43 PM
The bed of the lathe is over 180cm long. Should be able to handle it




Hi Mathew

If you and your wife are holding off having kids until you arrive here
when are you going to find time to do any woodturning

Darrell

QldWoodie
10th Nov 2004, 03:31 PM
So if Im envisioning this correctly I can buy a transformer that will, easily itself, plug into any standard Aus outlet. Then I plug in my NA 110 volt drill and away I go. I have a Porter Cable 12" chopsaw, I think it draws 15 amps. Will the transformers handle the amp draw.
Well, you'll have to buy the Australian style of plug here I guess, and fit it on the transformer. $2 and 2 minutes work. As for transformer size: 15 amps times 115 volts equals 1725 watts - make sure you get a transformer of this rating and bobs your uncle. You can buy transformers here OK, but probably not in Maroochy (you'll have to come to Brisbane) Tools with low duty cycles (intermittant usage, like a chop saw) can possibly get by with transformers of lesser rating but for things like your lathe that are under continuous load make sure the rating on the transformer says "continuous."

For someone who turns aluminium on a wood lathe, this shouldn't bee too hard at all!

Qw

Richard Casey
10th Nov 2004, 09:28 PM
Mathew, you are moving to the real world now where there is real BEER even though we dont own it any more, bring all your stuff you can buy the transformers here and you have a much superior lathe than you will buy here.If Mikko is reading this he may want to look at these lathes as well. When we were looking for a new lathe the VB 36 was the first choice followed by the ONEWAY. You wont have any freight problems as there is a container service from Vancoover to Brisbane , just ask your removalist for a price.

chris_hewett
23rd Dec 2004, 12:10 AM
Saw this thread as it was linked in another 115volt tool on 240volt power thread. I hope this is not too late, but any reference to using your lathe with a transformer should be ignored! your lathe will have an induction motor that will most likely be designed foe 115volts 60 cycles. We have 240volts 50 cycles. You should only use a transformer for universal motors (motors with brushes) such as your router, chop saw, hand drill, sander, sabre saw, shop vac etc. Your lathe, table saw, drill press, jointer etc will have induction motors and will most likely have to have the motors replaced. I would still bring the tools out though.

Cheers,

Chris

Alastair
23rd Dec 2004, 10:28 AM
Why?

I stand under correction, but my understanding is that provided the transformer has the moxie to handle the amperage required, the effect of the 50Hz/60Hz will only be to cause the indicated speeds to increase by some 12%. My lathe actually has 2 sets of speeds quoted on the headstock, for 50 and 60Hz operation.