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RETIRED
2nd Feb 2011, 07:09 AM
Originally posted by Hughie. Accidentally deleted by me.:-

Note the method of power and his tools, the English is a bit strange. :) scroll about half way down to find the Bowl Turner
Famous scenic spots introduction in Tibet,beautiful pictures in Tibet. 2007 March (http://www.18531.com/2007/03/)
__________________
hughie

Dont worry about life cos' your not gonna get out of it alive! :U

Ozkaban
2nd Feb 2011, 08:00 AM
Now that's cool - a Water powered lathe :2tsup:

very interesting article, if your head doesn't explode from reading the english :doh:

Thanks for posting Hughie/

Cheers,
Dave

brendan stemp
2nd Feb 2011, 10:26 AM
I could've used a water powered lathe recently.... in Horsham:D:D

Paul39
2nd Feb 2011, 11:05 AM
That is wonderful! Thanks Hughie & .


Aren't we turners spoiled rotten? And we complain if our chuck is running a few thousandths out.

I would like to have seen the headstock bearing. I'll bet it is wood, greased with yak butter.

I admire anyone who can use a hook tool. I had one adventure with one I bought at a wood turners yard sale. About 10 seconds in to the first use, the hook dug in, broke off the tip and launched the blank across the shop.

I ground it into a tool to make recesses and spigots for mounting blanks on the chuck.

artme
2nd Feb 2011, 11:26 AM
Fantastic!!!:):):)

Have to agree paul - we are spoiled, spoiled rotten!:B

Ed Reiss
2nd Feb 2011, 12:47 PM
Lots of ways to make products...just have to get used to the method employed in the geographical location you happen to find yourself in.

ticklingmedusa
2nd Feb 2011, 01:37 PM
A great photo essay Hughie & , thanks for putting it here.
I think the turner may need to drawfile his toolrest a little. :D

ticklingmedusa
2nd Feb 2011, 06:33 PM
I went out to sand a big bowl for a few hours tonight and thought about the way that toolrest looks and functions and realized those worn notches and grooves where he places his tools probably make his coring and hollowing capabilities more sophisticated than mine...
The language is hard to read but this picture says a lot.



http://www.18531.com/Image/20100518184320318

RETIRED
2nd Feb 2011, 07:37 PM
I have to admit that when doing huge quantities of the same style verandah posts the parting tool wore a groove in the tool rest on the same markings.

I used to leave them, a quick reference for lining things up.

Many years ago a company released a tool rest that could be "pegged" like a metal spinners rest for doing bowls.

ticklingmedusa
2nd Feb 2011, 08:09 PM
I have to admit that when doing huge quantities of the same style verandah posts the parting tool wore a groove in the tool rest on the same markings.

I used to leave them, a quick reference for lining things up.

Many years ago a company released a tool rest that could be "pegged" like a metal spinners rest for doing bowls.

A book from Sweden titled (translates to Turning, The Cutting Method by Sunqvist & Gustafsson (LTs forlag, Stockholm 1981)
describes and illustrates removable pegged rests that prevent
tools from falling into the chuck.
I don't know if this book has become available in English,
I read an excerpt in Fine Woodworking on Faceplate Turning
(Taunton Press 1994)

orraloon
4th Feb 2011, 02:57 PM
Sweedish would be just as easy to read as that. The pictures told the story well however and it was worth looking at. I was impressed with the water powered lathe.
Regards
John.

rsser
4th Feb 2011, 04:39 PM
Yeah, in Nepal they power gennies with water; long runs of split bamboo to feed wood impellers.

And when you join in a monastery's Buddhist service at 4am, even yak butter tea is welcome when it comes. But that's an acquired taste :rolleyes: