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View Full Version : HSS or Carbon blades whats the difference



Farm boy
5th Mar 2011, 03:22 PM
I started visiting the Woodturners in Newcastle at the show ground ,now most people use HSS blades. I have a set of Ashley Isles (carbon) hoping to get P&N blades eventually but apart from HSS holding there edge longer is there much difference between Carbon and HSS
Also the Ashley Isle tools need a new handles do you glue the tools into the new handles or bash them in
thanks in advance
Greg

pommyphil
5th Mar 2011, 03:55 PM
With the carbon steel you'll get plenty of sharpening practice and they are very easy to "burn" on the grinder, you can gradually replace them as you go.

Fixing handles depends on the tang, with a tapered square tang you bore decreasing size holes and drive them like a firmer chisel. Spindle and bowl gouges usually have a round, parallel tang, just drill a tight hole and glue.

Cheers Phil

Farm boy
5th Mar 2011, 06:57 PM
thanks phil
that was what i was after
cheers
greg

NeilS
5th Mar 2011, 07:12 PM
Keep your Ashley Isles carbons when you get the HSS tools. A quality carbon steel will take a sharper edge than HSS which won't stay sharp for very long, however, they are great for final light cuts which don't take a heavy toll on the edge.

The P&Ns are a good next step.
.

Terry V
6th Mar 2011, 07:40 AM
HSS tools won't make you a better turner but they are tougher. So as you buy more the old ones will get less use. But carbon steel does have some good points even now, as others have said. And you can use it to make your own tools.

Terry

My homemade turning tools (http://www.turnedwoodenbowls.com/forotherturners.html)

HSS
6th Mar 2011, 11:14 PM
Great website Terry; handy hints.

rsser
7th Mar 2011, 05:15 PM
Save your AI tools for soft to medium density timbers that don't have a lot of silica in them.

If there's some among them that you get good results with and don't want to retire, then maybe get a cheap wetgrinder like a GMC and learn to freehand sharpen them. Learning to refresh the edges with a paddle type diamond hone, and the flutes with good abrasive sheet wrapped around appropriate diameter dowel, will extend use between sharpenings grindings.

Farm boy
7th Mar 2011, 07:51 PM
I just changed my mind on the P&N tools :rolleyes:i was wondering about on ebay and picked up some used once robert sorby 18mm hss skew,32 mm hss roughing gouge and a ashby paring gouge? $112 for the lot, is this ok i will post a pic when i get them
Greg

Terry V
8th Mar 2011, 05:39 AM
Great website Terry; handy hints.

Thanks!
Terry

NeilS
8th Mar 2011, 09:32 AM
I just changed my mind on the P&N tools :rolleyes:i was wondering about on ebay and picked up some used once robert sorby 18mm hss skew,32 mm hss roughing gouge and a ashby paring gouge? $112 for the lot, is this ok i will post a pic when i get them
Greg

Price sounds about right.

Haven't used those particular Sorby tools myself, but have used other Sorby tools and have been happy with them.

There has been some talk about the quality of their HSS being a bit variable in recent times, but if they are older tools they should be good.

And, expect you will find they will perform much better than the Ashley Isle high carbons.
.

hughie
8th Mar 2011, 09:33 AM
Keep your Ashley Isles carbons when you get the HSS tools. A quality carbon steel will take a sharper edge than HSS which won't stay sharp for very long, however, they are great for final light cuts which don't take a heavy toll on the edge.



If there's some among them that you get good results with and don't want to retire, then maybe get a cheap wetgrinder like a GMC and learn to freehand sharpen them. Learning to refresh the edges with a paddle type diamond hone, and the flutes with good abrasive sheet wrapped around appropriate diameter dowel, will extend use between <strike>sharpenings</strike> grindings.

All very good advice, I have a couple of carbon steel gouges for finishing tricky stuff like Oregon :~ :U

Farm boy
14th Mar 2011, 07:04 PM
I finally got my turning tools and here is a picture, the only sad thing about them is on has a cracked feril on the abbiss brand one so that will have to be replaced
greg

Sawdust Maker
14th Mar 2011, 10:23 PM
You were asking about handles
here (http://www.thompsonlathetools.com/images/extra/TurningToolHandles.pdf)is a good article - you can buy most P&N unhandled

NeilS
14th Mar 2011, 10:37 PM
I finally got my turning tools and here is a picture, the only sad thing about them is on has a cracked feril on the abbiss brand one so that will have to be replaced
greg

Plenty of HSS left on those tools... looks like it was a good deal.
.

Bushmiller
15th Mar 2011, 04:41 AM
I think making handles for chisels is part of the fun. Making them all different shapes and from different timbers helps identification when only the handle is sticking out from a shelf or drawer. Turning tool handles can be any timber as unlike carpenters' chisels they are not struck.

I use spotted gum for carpenters' chisels. I have used leaf springs from old trucks for wood turning tools, carpenters' chisels and marking gauges. All work well within the limitation on holding their edge.

Regards
Paul

Paul39
15th Mar 2011, 12:16 PM
I finally got my turning tools and here is a picture, the only sad thing about them is on has a cracked feril on the abbiss brand one so that will have to be replaced
greg

I saw a photo of a world famous turner holding a tool that had a hose clamp for a ferrule. It may have been R. Raffan.

I was appalled! On further thought, why not, I would put a couple of wraps of tape around the clamp to keep from scratching myself on the end sticking out.

I use copper pipe, electrical metallic tubing, chain link fence top bar, or anything strong and round for ferrules. I grab short lengths in my chuck, run the lathe slowly, bevel the inside to slide on the handle, start a groove with a parting tool, and use a fine toothed hack saw to finish.

A little hand sanding to remove burrs, put it on the handle, put a shot of glue down the hole and drive in the tool with a hunk of wood.

Farm boy
15th Mar 2011, 06:53 PM
This broken ferrul will give me some practice in making tool handles,i am taking my tools to the woodturners class tomorow night to play with
thanks for the link sawdust maker i have added it to my favorites to check out later
greg

Sawdust Maker
15th Mar 2011, 07:59 PM
Somebody elsewhere (ie another post) suggested old chairs with aluminium legs or aluminium fold up chairs are a good source of ferrule material.

Bushmiller
15th Mar 2011, 10:00 PM
I have used steel pipe, stainless steel tube and even bought short lengths of brass tube for ferrules.

Regards
Paul

Farm boy
17th Mar 2011, 07:11 PM
I took the tools to turning last night the addiss has never been used and i found a nice chunck of brass to make a ferril with:2tsup:

Sawdust Maker
17th Mar 2011, 09:42 PM
great
isn't it good when all the planets align :cool: