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steve54123alt
24th May 2005, 03:22 PM
I used animal glue for the first time yesterday. I was a bit nervous about using it as I have heard some stories about the smell and how hard it is to get it at the right temperature etc. But it was dead easy! It took me about 30minutes to set up the glue in the pot, soaking it and melting it but once thatís done I just spread the glue with the stick I used to stir the glue with and smacked the veneer down, used my newly made veneer hammer J to squeeze out the excess and tada! Trimmed the edge of the veneer and I was done. No clamping and vacuuming no weights no 24-hour drying time. No smell of note, a bit sticky but itís all good. I will be using it for all my boxes in future.

Try it.:cool:

craigb
24th May 2005, 03:40 PM
Glad it worked well for you but can you use a bigger font next time?

Some of us don't have the eyesight we once had :rolleyes:

AlexS
24th May 2005, 04:01 PM
Glad it worked well for you but can you use a bigger font next time?

Some of us don't have the eyesight we once had :rolleyes:

I told you it would send you blind! :D

Steve, glad you had success with the animal glue. You never know how these things will go 'til you try.

outback
24th May 2005, 04:07 PM
Glad it worked well for you but can you use a bigger font next time?

Some of us don't have the eyesight we once had :rolleyes:
If you've been told once, you've been told a thousand times. STOP IT! OR YOU'LL GO BLIND! :D

Stubchain
24th May 2005, 04:23 PM
I have not used animal glue, but I think they should make glue from what ever bugs are made from. If you have ever tried getting splattered bugs off of the car after a long trip you will know what I mean, specially the ones that splat on the windscreen directly at eye level.

craigb
24th May 2005, 04:26 PM
If you've been told once, you've been told a thousand times. STOP IT! OR YOU'LL GO BLIND! :D

Talk about leading with your chin. :rolleyes:

What was I thinking.

:D :D

silentC
24th May 2005, 04:49 PM
I have not used animal glue, but I think they should make glue from what ever bugs are made from.
My vote goes to Flying Fox crap. We had a palm tree over our pool and one year the flying foxes came in to eat all the fruit of the tree. They shat all over the copers around the edge of the pool and nothing would budge it after it had dried in the sun the next day. In the end I used a steel scraper blade and a hammer but I only did one because it actually lifted the surface of the paver :eek:

Marc
24th May 2005, 07:20 PM
I used animal glue for the first time yesterday. I was a bit nervous about using it as I have heard some stories about the smell and how hard it is to get it at the right temperature etc. But it was dead easy! It took me about 30minutes to set up the glue in the pot, soaking it and melting it but once thatís done I just spread the glue with the stick I used to stir the glue with and smacked the veneer down, used my newly made veneer hammer J to squeeze out the excess and tada! Trimmed the edge of the veneer and I was done. No clamping and vacuuming no weights no 24-hour drying time. No smell of note, a bit sticky but itís all good. I will be using it for all my boxes in future.

Try it.:cool:
Why do you use a stick to spread the glue? I always used a brush. Just don't boil the brush and it will last a bit longer.

PS Is this size font OK

Snowy
24th May 2005, 07:32 PM
Steve

What type of boiler did you use and how did you make your hammer.

regards Snowy

geppetto
24th May 2005, 07:47 PM
Hi All,


Another question about hide glue.
How many times I could re-heat the glue until it loses its characteristics?:confused:

craigb
24th May 2005, 07:47 PM
PS Is this size font OK


no it's too bloody big

Sturdee
24th May 2005, 08:04 PM
How many times I could re-heat the glue until it loses its characteristics?:confused:

As often as you need to until used up, but I like to make only small portions at a time.


Peter.

geppetto
24th May 2005, 08:16 PM
As often as you need to until used up, but I like to make only small portions at a time.


Peter.
Thanks.
Another small question:rolleyes: : is it true that hide glue not needs of any clamps? I think when I'll veneer a large flat surface and I have not a press.:( :o

Sturdee
24th May 2005, 08:20 PM
That's right no clamps are needed when veneering.


Peter.

steve54123alt
24th May 2005, 08:46 PM
hey,
I used a small glue pot that i got off ebay... like a little billy with a smaller billycan that sits inside.
as for my hammer i just shaped a peice of scrap and stuck a handle in it... i'll post a pic soon. anything will do as long as it is smooth (so as to not scratch) and you can apply a fair amount of pressure.
I used a stick as i didn't want to deadicate a brush to glue...(tight i guess) and the stick worked really well.

pics to follow

Steve

AlexS
24th May 2005, 10:17 PM
Steve

What type of boiler did you use and how did you make your hammer.

regards Snowy

I've seen small suitable boilers in an artists' supply shop - not sure what they use them for (duh, glue maybe :rolleyes: ) but it wasn't very expensive.

powderpost
24th May 2005, 10:46 PM
We used animal glue in the workshop before the advent of aquahdere, about the middle sixties. It was absolutely verbotten to reheat the glue. The pot was cleaned out after each day and the pearls in the pot were only just covered with water and allowed to soak overnight. The pot was cast iron about the size of an old cast iron kettle with a smaller pot suspended inside. The outer pot was filled with water and heated over a small fire. The hardest thing was to keep the glue at the right temperature, about 140 degrees farhenheit. We then went modern and acquired an electric cast aluminium kettle. As the apprentice, it was my job to keep the glue useable. I know well the feeling of a boot for not achieving that goal. Animal glue does need pressure to keep the surfaces in contact and has one major advantage over modern glues, in that if the veneer doesn't bond properly, simply iron it down with a clothes iron. The introduction of aquahdere was a hell of a relief. I still use animal glue, but only to repair old furniture because the wam water will softem the old glue and bond to it. Modern water base glues do not adhere well to the old glue. Some of the furniture I have made can be seen at www.geocities.com/jimmac_4880/jimsshed.html (http://www.geocities.com/jimmac_4880/jimsshed.html)
Jim

Harry72
25th May 2005, 02:01 AM
Hey Jim.... "Sorry, the page you requested was not found."
You need to loose the "www."
As in http://geocities.com/jimmac_4880/Jimsshed.html

IanW
25th May 2005, 08:55 AM
I used a stick as i didn't want to deadicate a brush to glue...(tight i guess) and the stick worked really well.
Steve

Steve - you can get very cheap, suitable brushes from the chain hardware stores. I think the ones I use are called 'acid brushes' or something like that - just a bit of hair roled up in a piece of tin. (When I was a kid, we made them out of a wad of horsehair and a bit of jam tin). Each brush lasts a long time, unless you let it set in the glue and try to wrench it out.........
The advantage of using brushes over a stick (which I do occasionally, when in a hurry on a small job - doesn't everyone?) is that it's quicker, and I find it a good way to judge the glue consistency - if it brushes on easily, it's about right.
Cheers,

starr
25th May 2005, 01:59 PM
I disagree that you can reheat hide glue (animal glue) any number of times. If you look up on the Web I think you will get general agreement that you should ideally only make up what you need. Refer to http://www.inthewoodshop.org/2005/hideglue.shtml for some good information about hide glue.

kiwigeo
25th May 2005, 03:54 PM
Hi All,


Another question about hide glue.
How many times I could re-heat the glue until it loses its characteristics?:confused:

I use the stuff on some of the joints on my guitars (mainly tops and backs of instruements). I generally dont keep the stuff...once Ive done a job the excess gets chucked and new glue gets made up for next job. I dont make alot in one batch..just enough for the job(s) Im about to do. One trick which I havent yet tried is to make up small batches in small yoghurt containers and stick them in the fridge untill theyre needed. When time comes for the job you take out container and reheat..

If you dont mind me asking WHY are you using hide glue? Do you need to reverse the glue joints at some stage? (reason I use it on some joints on guitars). If thats not the case then IMO there are better glues to use.

kiwigeo
25th May 2005, 03:56 PM
Check out Guild of American Luthiers website for links to other sites which have screeds of material discussing hide glue.

Happy gluing!

steve54123alt
25th May 2005, 07:45 PM
"If you dont mind me asking WHY are you using hide glue? Do you need to reverse the glue joints at some stage? (reason I use it on some joints on guitars). If thats not the case then IMO there are better glues to use."

I'm useing hide glue as i've had a couple of bad run-in's veneering with other glues... thought that i would give it a go, and well it worked really well. don't thik that it will get hot enough on the coast here (inside) to melt the glue again...

Below is a pic of my pot :) and the hammer that i made. i'm still looking for a peice of brass to slide in to the leading edge, but it works just fine. :)