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KlausK
27th Nov 2013, 01:30 AM
Hi Handtoolers,

often Pedder and I discussed how to manage it to offer a split nut driver matching to the saw handle. We did a few attempts and thought that a driver handle has to be thicker as the saw handle is. Frequently we only have handle wood not thicker than 1" so we put the idea of the matching driver in the "later project drawer".

Then, 2 years later or so, I met another woodworker. He was a complete woodturning newbie but he showed very soon, that he was talented when I gave him my lathe to play a little bit with. I asked him to look for a design of a splitnut driver with a handle not thicker than 1". What he came up with convinced me completely. Wolfgang, that's the guy, came up with the driver design you will see on the following pics.

The saw is a 10" Fine Joinery Saw with Ebony handle and MOP inlay. Pedder finished the saw this weekend and I think he did it great.

294936 294937 294938

Thanks for looking
Klaus

Optimark
27th Nov 2013, 02:02 PM
Klaus, welcome to the forum, very professional indeed.

Is it possible to see the business end of the tool along with the other side of the saw, so we can see the nuts as well?

Are you a business, or a hobby business?

If you are, then I will be in Tübingen and maybe Reutlingen next year, I may be able to pick up something from you ......................

Mick.

planemaker
27th Nov 2013, 05:50 PM
Welcome to the forum Klaus. Another wonderful backsaw. Since your now a member of this forum can we now claim you as part Aussie. :D

Stewie;

KlausK
27th Nov 2013, 06:24 PM
Klaus, welcome to the forum, very professional indeed.

Is it possible to see the business end of the tool along with the other side of the saw, so we can see the nuts as well?

Are you a business, or a hobby business?

If you are, then I will be in Tübingen and maybe Reutlingen next year, I may be able to pick up something from you ......................

Mick.

Thanks a lot, Mick!

There's only one more pic I can show. It shows the other side of the saw but it doesn't show the business end of the driver. Since the saw and the driver are shipped already, I'm not able to take another pic.

294988

The split nuts you can see do look unusual. We use stainless screws and nuts on our saws. Those nuts are common ones according to the German specifications (DIN).

Pedder and I run Two Lawyers Tools as a (very little) side business just for fun. Due to some heavy wood allergies, I was forced to make a break of more than one year from the saw making. I'm the handle maker while Pedder makes the blades and the spines. Now the issues I had are better to control, so the saw making can be continued. But only a small number of saws per year. That's what Pedder and I wanted since we started the adventure in 2009.

You will visit Tübingen?!!! Please tell me when that will be. I'd be happy to meet you. Tübingen is just about 40 km apart from my home, it's just an hour by car. I lived about 4 years in Tübingen. There's a big university where I studied as well.

Cheers
Klaus

KlausK
27th Nov 2013, 06:31 PM
Welcome to the forum Klaus. Another wonderful backsaw. Since your now a member of this forum can we now claim you as part Aussie. :D

Stewie;

Hi Stewie,

thanks for the kind invitation and for the warm welcome. I feel honoured indeed.

Cheers
Klaus

Simplicity
27th Nov 2013, 08:47 PM
Hi kalus
Very impressive saw.
I love the way u fitted the back to the handle.
And I love the use of stainless steel saw bolts
Could u tell us how u put your logo on the blade
Is it acid etch?
Also have you looked at the general woodwork section?
At the back saw work shop lead
Very nice saw.
Matt

KlausK
27th Nov 2013, 09:18 PM
Hi kalus
Very impressive saw.
I love the way u fitted the back to the handle.
And I love the use of stainless steel saw bolts
Could u tell us how u put your logo on the blade
Is it acid etch?
Also have you looked at the general woodwork section?
At the back saw work shop lead
Very nice saw.
Matt

Thank you, Matt.

The first 2 years or so, we used acid etches on the blades. We haven't been too happy with those, since they didn't accept a further polishing of the blade. Sometimes you like to repolish the blade while saw making though. Now we use laser etches that will be done by a company professionally. We're very happy with it.

Thanks for the hint. Yet I'm not familiar with this forum but looking forward to lurking a little bit.

Cheers
Klaus

Claw Hama
27th Nov 2013, 10:40 PM
Hi Klaus
Yes, welcome to the forum, it should be a wealth of information to you and us.
I had heard of you guys but not seen your tools. They look spectacular, beautiful, please show us more.
And maybe a hint at the cost if we were to order one of these beautiful tools:U
I hope you enjoy your time here.

KlausK
27th Nov 2013, 11:40 PM
Hi Klaus
Yes, welcome to the forum, it should be a wealth of information to you and us.
I had heard of you guys but not seen your tools. They look spectacular, beautiful, please show us more.
And maybe a hint at the cost if we were to order one of these beautiful tools:U
I hope you enjoy your time here.

Thanks a lot, Claw.

I don't know if I'm allowed to set here a link to the TLT-Blog. I just try it. If that doesn't matches the forum rules, please remove it, dear Mod.

Two Lawyers Toolworks (http://two-lawyers-toolworks.blogspot.de/?option=com_fireboard&Itemid=58)

On our Blog you will find some more information about Pedder, me and our saw making adventure.

Since all of our saws are configurated individually as they are bespoke to the users hand, there are different prices as well. A dovetail saw starts at 170 EUR however.

Cheers
Klaus

DSEL74
28th Nov 2013, 12:00 AM
Klaus,


Congrats on another great saw!!

Those of you who were at the saw making workshop and tried some of the sample saws brought in. Ray's Ebony handled saw was made by TLT and looks very much like the one above minus the mother of pearl inlay. It is also the saw that inspired the whole endeavour. You may also be interested to know these guys hand file that brass back to shape.


Klaus is the split nut driver shown the same head as your others??

295021
295022
The new handle design reminds me of Blue Spruce Chisels which are a lovely shape.

KlausK
28th Nov 2013, 01:08 AM
Klaus,


Congrats on another great saw!!

Those of you who were at the saw making workshop and tried some of the sample saws brought in. Ray's Ebony handled saw was made by TLT and looks very much like the one above minus the mother of pearl inlay. It is also the saw that inspired the whole endeavour. You may also be interested to know these guys hand file that brass back to shape.


Klaus is the split nut driver shown the same head as your others??

295021
295022
The new handle design reminds me of Blue Spruce Chisels which are a lovely shape.

Thank you very much, DSEL.

You're right, the blade of the new designed driver is exactly the same as it has been before on the old drivers. Should have had the idea myself to show the business end this way. I guess, that Wolfgang was inspired by the Blue Spruce chisel handle, when he designed the driver handle.

Cheers
Klaus

Isaac S
28th Nov 2013, 03:16 AM
Beautiful work, Klaus. Both the old and new drivers look great. And of course, the saw is just gorgeous.

DSEL74
28th Nov 2013, 07:02 AM
Beautiful work, Klaus. Both the old and new drivers look great. And of course, the saw is just gorgeous.

Isaac, When are we going to see you start posting some of yours???

KlausK
28th Nov 2013, 07:37 AM
Beautiful work, Klaus. Both the old and new drivers look great. And of course, the saw is just gorgeous.

Thank you Isaac!

Nice to meet a fellow saw maker here on the other side of the world:wink:

Cheers
Klaus

IanW
28th Nov 2013, 07:53 AM
Isaac, When are we going to see you start posting some of yours???

Um, wot's this (http://www.woodworkforums.com/f152/autumn-classics-179068/), Dale? (the post currently adjacent to this one.:U)

Klaus, welcome to the Forum - but be warned, we'll be extracting information from you like dentists pulling teeth! :;

I like your driver handles - the diameter of the handle isn't all that critical, imo, since you should not need to tighten the nuts to a high torque, just enough to keep the saw firm. My drivers aren't quite as elegant as yours, just a flat blade with a tang. I decided on a 'door knob' style for the handle, partly because I have plenty of scraps of pretty wood, so I can show-off more of it. We are lucky to have some spectacular woods down here, that are not quite as precious as Ebony, so we can afford to be wasteful! :U I made these for our recent saw-making workshop, the outer two are Rosewood and Olive, which of course are exotic to Australia, while the inner two are 'She-oak' (Allocasaurina torulosa) and Blaackwood (Acacia melanoxylon) respectively.

295033


Your handles are so precisely fitted, they look as though you don't need bolts! If you have time, could you please show us how you go about fitting your blades & that elliptical spine?

Cheers,

KlausK
28th Nov 2013, 08:48 AM
Um, wot's this (http://www.woodworkforums.com/f152/autumn-classics-179068/), Dale? (the post currently adjacent to this one.:U)

Klaus, welcome to the Forum - but be warned, we'll be extracting information from you like dentists pulling teeth! :;

I like your driver handles - the diameter of the handle isn't all that critical, imo, since you should not need to tighten the nuts to a high torque, just enough to keep the saw firm. My drivers aren't quite as elegant as yours, just a flat blade with a tang. I decided on a 'door knob' style for the handle, partly because I have plenty of scraps of pretty wood, so I can show-off more of it. We are lucky to have some spectacular woods down here, that are not quite as precious as Ebony, so we can afford to be wasteful! :U I made these for our recent saw-making workshop, the outer two are Rosewood and Olive, which of course are exotic to Australia, while the inner two are 'She-oak' (Allocasaurina torulosa) and Blaackwood (Acacia melanoxylon) respectively.

295033


Your handles are so precisely fitted, they look as though you don't need bolts! If you have time, could you please show us how you go about fitting your blades & that elliptical spine?

Cheers,

Thank you, Ian.

Those are some beautiful drivers you show. What did you use to finish them? Looks glossy nearly like laquer. I've a weakness for Olive so the right one is my favourite.

I like the picture with the dentist. Please be aware that I also could be the dentist and you the poor client that has to take care on his teeth:D

I will share how I make the mortise for the spine on a saw handle and how the ovally shaped spine will be fitted. Please give me a little time since I want to take some more pics.

Cheers
Klaus

planemaker
28th Nov 2013, 09:27 AM
Hi Ian. I am pretty sure Dale is talking about Isaac's saw nut driver he offers for sale on his website.

Blackburn Tools - Saw nut spanner (http://www.blackburntools.com/new-tools/new-saws-and-related/saw-nut-spanner/index.html)

IanW
28th Nov 2013, 09:10 PM
Hi Ian. I am pretty sure Dale is talking about Isaac's saw nut driver he offers for sale on his website.

OK, gotcha - I was wondering how he could have failed to see the saw post. Should read more carefully..... :B
Cheers,

IanW
28th Nov 2013, 09:26 PM
... What did you use to finish them? Looks glossy nearly like laquer. I've a weakness for Olive so the right one is my favourite...

Hi Klaus. I used one of our sponsors products called "Shellawax". It's an emulsified shellac/wax mixture that you apply on the lathe. It is very simple to do, and lasts quite well. I also use it on saw handles. In that case, I rub it into the wood and buff it to a shine with a cloth wheel chucked in my lathe. It's a lazy person's way of getting a nice finish quickly - does a fantastic job on ebony!295163.

Olive is certainly a nice wood, but we are blessed with some pretty spectacular native woods to choose from, too....

Cheers,

KlausK
29th Nov 2013, 05:37 AM
Hi Klaus. I used one of our sponsors products called "Shellawax". It's an emulsified shellac/wax mixture that you apply on the lathe. It is very simple to do, and lasts quite well. I also use it on saw handles. In that case, I rub it into the wood and buff it to a shine with a cloth wheel chucked in my lathe. It's a lazy person's way of getting a nice finish quickly - does a fantastic job on ebony!295163.

Olive is certainly a nice wood, but we are blessed with some pretty spectacular native woods to choose from, too....

Cheers,

That's interesting indeed, Ian.

A few years ago I got a hint about Shellawax from Derek Cohen. It was the time when Pedder and I found Tru Oil to be a very good finish. I followed this hint and found out, that Shellawax indeed is a very high quality finish but a friction finish that typically needs the higher temperatures the workpiece gets when it will be finished in the lathe. Your marking gauge shows that it doesn't need higher temperatures necessarily to create a very nice gloss. Did you finish the driver handles in the lathe? They look that perfect...

Cheers
Klaus

IanW
29th Nov 2013, 08:31 AM
A few years ago I got a hint about Shellawax from Derek Cohen. It was the time when Pedder and I found Tru Oil to be a very good finish. I followed this hint and found out, that Shellawax indeed is a very high quality finish but a friction finish that typically needs the higher temperatures the workpiece gets when it will be finished in the lathe. Your marking gauge shows that it doesn't need higher temperatures necessarily to create a very nice gloss. Did you finish the driver handles in the lathe? They look that perfect...


Klaus, yes, the driver handles were finished on the lathe. This is what Shellawax is designed for, and it does its job extremely well. It takes very little practise to learn how much to apply (not much!) and to move the pad at the right speed to generate the heat required, without cooking your fingers. The quality of the finish depends on the wood, of course, and fine-grained woods like Ebony and Olive respond magnificently.

When applying Shellawax to small objects like saw handles, you have two options - just rub it on as you would when using a shellac rubber on furniture, & if you are careful, you can achieve a fairly good low-gloss finish. But if you want a more prefect and high-gloss surface, it's necessary to buff it to raise that surface temperature. I run the cloth-wheel at a high speed, which does the job, but you must be careful, or you will remove too much of the polish and cause a bare patch, or even scorch the wood..

What surprised me most about the stuff is that despite being such an easy way to finish, which leaves a very thin coating, it is very durable. I have tools I finished with Shellawax more than 15 years ago, & they still look good. However, I think that has quite a bit to do with the type of wood, too.

Cheers,