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Tonto
8th Oct 2016, 11:17 AM
Looking at expanding my woodworking interest and having never used a lathe before have seen 2 Symtec 1500 up for sale $1000, & $1500 each.

Whats your thoughts please

Enfield Guy
8th Oct 2016, 11:33 AM
There are a couple of videos on you tube. I believe they were Aussie made, but not any more. I'd reckon you would want to be sure it is all there. They do work differently to a conventional lathe.

pommyphil
8th Oct 2016, 12:34 PM
The standard advice for beginner woodturners is join a club,or mens shed. This gives you a chance to try before you buy. Very easy to waste money and time with the wrong gear.

Optimark
8th Oct 2016, 02:14 PM
Wood lathes are probably reasonably thin on the ground where you are located, although you may get a surprise.

If you cannot find a Menís Shed or a wood turning club nearby, then I would suggest you look elsewhere. The web search I did, showed some interesting lathes, but for your quoted price, I think you could do a fair bit better, even purchasing new.

I looked at Hare and Forbes and came up with this, which is a reasonable unit and something that should give you a fair bit of capability.
W382 | WL-18 Swivel Head Wood Lathe | For Sale Sydney Brisbane Melbourne Perth | Buy Workshop Equipment & Machinery online at machineryhouse.com.au (http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/W382)

This lathe uses a variable speed system via a belt drive, nothing wrong with that, one of my brothers had one for a few years, before upgrading to electronic variable speed. This is an example of how the speed change system works, also why you should change the belt every now and then.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4h-Me5lSOY

Delivery to postcode 5631 is $170, with the current cost of the lathe at $550 for a total delivered to your shed for $720.

That took me about one minute of looking, but I will admit, I now have a bit of an idea of where to look.

The cost of the lathe, will probably be about a third of the total cost you may end up spending in the long run. You will need a set of chisels, I went the cheapest 6 pack set, which at the time was reasonable value and if I was going to damage anything, cost would be minimised. This is the actual set I purchased, although I picked my set up for $80; they were on special and it was some time ago.
W302 | WT-6 HSS Wood Turning Tool Set | For Sale Sydney Brisbane Melbourne Perth | Buy Workshop Equipment & Machinery online at machineryhouse.com.au (http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/W302)

You will also require a way of sharpening your respective chisels, but that is for another conversation.

Second hand lathes with 6 or 8 speed changes via a belt change system, would be where I would be looking. Early electronic variable speed lathes, whether they were very expensive units, or bottom of the drawer stuff, seemed to be a bit iffy, if one believes the reams of stuff written about them around the time of them becoming reasonably common.

I would be looking at a lathe with as low a speed as possible. My own lathe, a Nova 1624, has 8 separate speeds ranging from 178 to 3000. Whenever I put an odd shaped piece of wood on, I always run it at the lowest speed first off. It really isnít solely about the weight of the wood, the shape and where the actual centre axis of the wood is located, in relation to the axis of the lathe, is what is important to find out.

The lathe I have mentioned does have what I call a bit of a flaw, its lowest speed is 500rpm. However, my brother lived with this speed restriction and did very well, but succumbed to the siren call of electronic variable speed and upgraded. Something I will only probably do, if my ship comes in. :roll:

You could also look at Ledacraft in South Australia, they have their version of the same lathe going for $649. Obviously closer, but still you would have a delivery cost.
Lathes - Wood : LEDACRAFT MC-900 WOOD LATHE (http://www.ledamachinery.com.au/index.php/lathes-wood/ledacraft-mc-900-wood-lathe-detail)

Food for thought, and do ask away.

Mick.

China
8th Oct 2016, 03:59 PM
For that sort of money you could by a "proper" lathe and save yourself a lot of grief

Tonto
8th Oct 2016, 04:16 PM
Thanks guys, I'am glad my thinking was the same as yours, big expense for what you get.

Wasn't really excited about it but SWMBO jumped at the idea, and this way she can stay out of shed.

hughie
8th Oct 2016, 07:37 PM
Wood lathes are probably reasonably thin on the ground where you are located, although you may get a surprise.

If you cannot find a Menís Shed or a wood turning club nearby, then I would suggest you look elsewhere. The web search I did, showed some interesting lathes, but for your quoted price, I think you could do a fair bit better, even purchasing new.

I looked at Hare and Forbes and came up with this, which is a reasonable unit and something that should give you a fair bit of capability.
W382 | WL-18 Swivel Head Wood Lathe | For Sale Sydney Brisbane Melbourne Perth | Buy Workshop Equipment & Machinery online at machineryhouse.com.au (http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/W382)

This lathe uses a variable speed system via a belt drive, nothing wrong with that, one of my brothers had one for a few years, before upgrading to electronic variable speed. This is an example of how the speed change system works, also why you should change the belt every now and then.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4h-Me5lSOY

Delivery to postcode 5631 is $170, with the current cost of the lathe at $550 for a total delivered to your shed for $720.

That took me about one minute of looking, but I will admit, I now have a bit of an idea of where to look.

The cost of the lathe, will probably be about a third of the total cost you may end up spending in the long run. You will need a set of chisels, I went the cheapest 6 pack set, which at the time was reasonable value and if I was going to damage anything, cost would be minimised. This is the actual set I purchased, although I picked my set up for $80; they were on special and it was some time ago.
W302 | WT-6 HSS Wood Turning Tool Set | For Sale Sydney Brisbane Melbourne Perth | Buy Workshop Equipment & Machinery online at machineryhouse.com.au (http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/W302)

You will also require a way of sharpening your respective chisels, but that is for another conversation.






Second hand lathes with 6 or 8 speed changes via a belt change system, would be where I would be looking. Early electronic variable speed lathes, whether they were very expensive units, or bottom of the drawer stuff, seemed to be a bit iffy, if one believes the reams of stuff written about them around the time of them becoming reasonably common.

I would be looking at a lathe with as low a speed as possible. My own lathe, a Nova 1624, has 8 separate speeds ranging from 178 to 3000. Whenever I put an odd shaped piece of wood on, I always run it at the lowest speed first off. It really isnít solely about the weight of the wood, the shape and where the actual centre axis of the wood is located, in relation to the axis of the lathe, is what is important to find out.

The lathe I have mentioned does have what I call a bit of a flaw, its lowest speed is 500rpm. However, my brother lived with this speed restriction and did very well, but succumbed to the siren call of electronic variable speed and upgraded. Something I will only probably do, if my ship comes in. :roll:

You could also look at Ledacraft in South Australia, they have their version of the same lathe going for $649. Obviously closer, but still you would have a delivery cost.
Lathes - Wood : LEDACRAFT MC-900 WOOD LATHE (http://www.ledamachinery.com.au/index.php/lathes-wood/ledacraft-mc-900-wood-lathe-detail)

Food for thought, and do ask away.

Mick.

This is darn good advice, follow it. The lathe may seem a lot but over time the 'rest' will dwarf the lathe cost. The only benefit is that its over time :U

KBs PensNmore
8th Oct 2016, 10:32 PM
I run a Symtec 1500 also, and find it excellent to use. I paid $1500 for mine, but it came with a couple of copying stylus's, an attachment to take a router/trimmer plus the trimmer and various other Symtec parts, but not the rotating attachment for doing spirals. I can put you in touch with the Symtec Owners Group, if you'd like more details.
Not very often do I use the copying stylus, I tend to use it more as a conventional lathe, turning pens, plates, bowls etc.using normal turning tools, and find it very similar to use as a conventional lathe.
Kryn

Gassy
4th Jan 2017, 11:03 AM
I looked at Hare and Forbes and came up with this, which is a reasonable unit and something that should give you a fair bit of capability.
W382 | WL-18 Swivel Head Wood Lathe | For Sale Sydney Brisbane Melbourne Perth | Buy Workshop Equipment & Machinery online at machineryhouse.com.au (http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/W382)


Slightly old thread but anyone researching these may want to watch https://youtu.be/dSR5gXGLuYo it's the same thing and has the shortcomings explained, you may or may not want to live with them. I think it's the same as the Leda MC-900. I am personally trying to avoid a movable headstock for spindle work, it's just one more thing to have alignment issues with.