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mummatoni
25th Dec 2017, 11:33 PM
hi everybody
hope you all had a merry xmas and even more prosperous new year. i am wondering if anyone can point me in which Australian woods takes a hand chased thread onto it? anyone know would be greatly appreciated
Thanks Toni Parker

keep on plugging away

BobL
26th Dec 2017, 12:19 AM
They pretty well all take a thread but some do so better than others.
What sort of load are you going to place the thread under?
If it's a high load then timber with cross grained character should be stronger than others.

Gabriel
26th Dec 2017, 02:53 AM
Though I don't have experience doing it myself, I am told that inland rosewood and orange boxwood are very good for it.

mummatoni
26th Dec 2017, 04:39 AM
They pretty well all take a thread but some do so better than others.
What sort of load are you going to place the thread under?
If it's a high load then timber with cross grained character should be stronger than others.just for in box lids. i have the 16tpi set that i would like to learn
for a beginner which wood be the best to start with?

keep on plugging away

smiife
26th Dec 2017, 07:54 PM
Hi toni , good luck on your journey........
I hope you are patient and have a bit of time on your hands
It takes a lot of practice and at first it doesn, t matter which wood
you use just try what you have at first and don, t get dissappointed
If at first you don, t succeed....
A timber that is hard /heavy and a tight grain...
I found wenge and ebony the best but i did practice with a candle once !:o
Some of mine where a total failure and some looked ok but when
screwed up together didn, t meet very good (drucken threads ) I
Think is the term used!
I have been "practicing" for over a year and have one or two successful
Boxes with good threads ,
Hope this helps you and don, t get disheartened if things go pear shaped.......

powderpost
26th Dec 2017, 10:40 PM
Hi Mummatoni, I have been hand chasing threads for a while now. A few pointers to start with, that "pretty well all take a thread", is very misleading and absolute rubbish for hand chased threads. It is true that with patience and super glue it is possible. I have cut hand chased threads on black bean and red cedar, not possible without applying super glue along the way. You will find it difficult starting with 16 tpi chasers, not impossible but difficult. I would suggest that 20 tpi much easier for starting. Fruit tree wood is good, especially citrus trees (orange, grapefruit or lemon). The wood needs to be close grained and not to hard, inland rosewood will test you, it is a bit too hard to start with. Osage orange, if obtainable is good as is dead finish. Any of the gidgee species and some of the acacias are good too. A lot depends on what you can get hold of.

Jim

Kidbee
26th Dec 2017, 10:40 PM
.......and when you get as expert as this fellow, let us know!

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-0iEd0kD0S4

mummatoni
26th Dec 2017, 11:26 PM
Hi Mummatoni, I have been hand chasing threads for a while now. A few pointers to start with, that "pretty well all take a thread", is very misleading and absolute rubbish for hand chased threads. It is true that with patience and super glue it is possible. I have cut hand chased threads on black bean and red cedar, not possible without applying super glue along the way. You will find it difficult starting with 16 tpi chasers, not impossible but difficult. I would suggest that 20 tpi much easier for starting. Fruit tree wood is good, especially citrus trees (orange, grapefruit or lemon). The wood needs to be close grained and not to hard, inland rosewood will test you, it is a bit too hard to start with. Osage orange, if obtainable is good as is dead finish. Any of the gidgee species and some of the acacias are good too. A lot depends on what you can get hold of.

Jimthanks Jim,
cool hubby on Xmas eve did bring me home a full log of gidgee from Winton. our old home town did hope she was one that could let me begin to learn as trying to purchase the woods you need to learn with run away with a fortune. so thanks for this info hugely appreciated
Thanks Toni Parker

keep on plugging away

mummatoni
26th Dec 2017, 11:29 PM
Hi toni , good luck on your journey........
I hope you are patient and have a bit of time on your hands
It takes a lot of practice and at first it doesn, t matter which wood
you use just try what you have at first and don, t get dissappointed
If at first you don, t succeed....
A timber that is hard /heavy and a tight grain...
I found wenge and ebony the best but i did practice with a candle once !:o
Some of mine where a total failure and some looked ok but when
screwed up together didn, t meet very good (drucken threads ) I
Think is the term used!
I have been "practicing" for over a year and have one or two successful
Boxes with good threads ,
Hope this helps you and don, t get disheartened if things go pear shaped.......time is plentiful so it all good that is one thing actually do have on my side as turning for me is actual that to pass the time. so i be ok on that front
Thanks Toni Parker

keep on plugging away

hughie
27th Dec 2017, 08:56 AM
Hi Mummatoni, I have been hand chasing threads for a while now. A few pointers to start with, that "pretty well all take a thread", is very misleading and absolute rubbish for hand chased threads. It is true that with patience and super glue it is possible. I have cut hand chased threads on black bean and red cedar, not possible without applying super glue along the way. You will find it difficult starting with 16 tpi chasers, not impossible but difficult. I would suggest that 20 tpi much easier for starting. Fruit tree wood is good, especially citrus trees (orange, grapefruit or lemon). The wood needs to be close grained and not to hard, inland rosewood will test you, it is a bit too hard to start with. Osage orange, if obtainable is good as is dead finish. Any of the gidgee species and some of the acacias are good too. A lot depends on what you can get hold of.

Jim

Good advice, go with this . We are lucky in that we have several species that will take a decent thread

keithg
27th Dec 2017, 06:16 PM
Hi,
the best threads I ever got were with bluegum
Cheers