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burn
9th Oct 2005, 07:09 PM
Hi Peoples,

I intend to build a 900mm fixed extension table onto the rear of my new TSC-10HB. I will make the table a tortion box out of 12mm ply.

My question is .... to mount the 'tortion-box' I figure I just bolt some 3-5mm counter-leaved steel plate to the bottom of the rail at the back - bolting it say every 450mm. I'll counter-leave it about 60mm and then bolt the tortion-box on top of it. I will put some stays from the far edge of the box to the base of the cabinet.

GIVEN you can imagine this design, is it a reasonable one. I don't have the room to set up a big outfeed table, but the extra 900mm, I think should be enough.

Comments??? Suggestions?

PaulS
9th Oct 2005, 08:07 PM
here is one i made..

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/showthread.php?t=20136

hopes this helps

Paul

burn
9th Oct 2005, 10:24 PM
Paul,

I take it, for the fixed portion, which is all that I can afford in space terms, is melamine chipboard on 40 x 19 pine. The first piece of pine of your fixed table portion is bolted/screwed onto the slide.

Why didn't your drop your 'stays' of the fixed portion of your fixed table down to the base of the cabinet as opposed to the middle - the width of the fixed portion of extension table?

In use, is the bolting directly onto the rear slide of the TSC-xHB, good enough? Am I over engineering by wanting to add a plate to ride under the rear (factor supplied) square slide?

Burn

PaulS
9th Oct 2005, 11:30 PM
Paul,
Why didn't your drop your 'stays' of the fixed portion of your fixed table down to the base of the cabinet as opposed to the middle - the width of the fixed portion of extension table?
Burn

No real reason, i just copied the design from the website



In use, is the bolting directly onto the rear slide of the TSC-xHB, good enough? Am I over engineering by wanting to add a plate to ride under the rear (factor supplied) square slide?

Burn

I have found it fine, no problems so far.


Paul

Noel157
10th Oct 2005, 06:30 AM
Burn, here's my version. Although folding, the stays of the fixed portion of the table are attached to the base of the saw.

http://premium1.uploadit.org/noel157//IMG_0001rcd.jpg

http://premium1.uploadit.org/noel157//IMG_0002rcd.jpg

Noel

burn
10th Oct 2005, 07:59 AM
Thanks Noel.

silentC
10th Oct 2005, 09:36 AM
I may have the wrong mental picture but it sounds like you're going to support the rear of the table by dropping diagonal braces back to the base of the cabinet? If so, I think you'll want legs supporting the rear of the table and resting on the floor, or it will be in danger of tipping over if you cut something long and heavy on it.

burn
10th Oct 2005, 09:43 AM
SilentC,

Yes, You have the right mental picture ... my idea is to have a table like Noel's pictures, but without the folding extension. Good point about weight. I can easily add two folding legs in addition to the diagonal braces which lead back to the base of the saw.

My main issue is bolting an 80mm wide plate (3mm?) to the rail at the back of the saw. Is this safe?

silentC
10th Oct 2005, 10:33 AM
Don't see any reason why not, as long as the bolt heads don't interfere with the fence in any way it should be okay. Don't forget the fence has that little foot on it that rides on that bar, so you can't have anything protruding through the rail to the top. Maybe a couple of lengths of angle iron sharing the same bolt holes would work?

burn
10th Oct 2005, 11:23 AM
My intent is to bolt the plate to the rear rail (shown). I will drill holes on the underside of the rail at the locations where the rail has access holes drilled which are used to access the allen bolt which attaches the rail to the table.

By drilling my holes at these points I can access both ends of the bolt. I can push the bolt through from the bottom and drop a washer, spring washer then nut on the end of the bolt using the access hole and some needle nose pliers ... fiddly but doable I think.

Burn

dazzler
10th Oct 2005, 12:05 PM
Hi Burn,

i am about to embark on a similar project.

have you thought of building a big square box out of mdf with wheels that slides up to the back of the TS and has a couple of magnets that hold it firm against the rear of the TS. (or some other clamp to hold it)

This way you can roll it around out of the way, can put drawers in it, store the dust bin or whatever in it, or use as a second table for finishing or whatever by placing a piece sacrificial mdf on top as well.

This is the way i am going on the weekend.

i will draw a picture of what I am talking about:rolleyes: .

cheers

dazzler

burn
10th Oct 2005, 12:25 PM
Hi Burn,
....
have you thought of building a big square box out of mdf with wheels that slides up to the back of the TS and has a couple of magnets that hold it firm against the rear of the TS. (or some other clamp to hold it)
...
dazzler

Bloody good idea. The only issue becomes the shed floor ... given mine's not nicely level (poor construction) I may still have to go with a table attached to the TS rail to avoid an uneven table top.

By the way, would magnets that are strong enough to hold a heavy table against the TS rail, effect the motor in any way? Lots of magnetic fields flying about in a small area?

MrFixIt
14th Oct 2005, 01:44 PM
Hi
I intend to build a 900mm fixed extension table onto the rear of my new TSC-10HB. I will make the table a tortion box out of 12mm ply.
FWIW, why don't you use one of the readily avialable torsion boxes? They are commonly referred to as hollow core doors :D

They are light and strong, easily strong enough for your requirements. The only disadvantage is the inability to *easily* put matching mitre guide slots into the top surface. I can think of a number of workarounds for this though.

Hollow core doors make good benchtops suitable for most things. You can't easily have bench stop holes in them though. Well worth considering for light duty benches and can frequently be found for free in local newspapers/trading posts etc.

burn
14th Oct 2005, 02:05 PM
Thanks Peter, not a bad idea. As you say, one would need to cut out the spaces for the miter slots, fill with solid timber then slot them.

Burn

MrFixIt
14th Oct 2005, 02:44 PM
Thanks Peter, not a bad idea. As you say, one would need to cut out the spaces for the miter slots, fill with solid timber then slot them.

BurnYes, that's one way.
You could also consider...
...if your TS has a motor hanging out the back, a short (solid) extension with mitre slots, to which you attach this torsion box - hinged or fixed.

...position some aluminium track to match the mitre guides then fill in the "spaces" around the track with suitable thickness mdf etc.

...put the mdf on the door then route out the slots

Harry72
14th Oct 2005, 11:11 PM
My intent is to bolt the plate to the rear rail (shown). I will drill holes on the underside of the rail at the locations where the rail has access holes drilled which are used to access the allen bolt which attaches the rail to the table.

By drilling my holes at these points I can access both ends of the bolt. I can push the bolt through from the bottom and drop a washer, spring washer then nut on the end of the bolt using the access hole and some needle nose pliers ... fiddly but doable I think.

Burn
Rather drilling holes in the rear chrome rail and weakening it, how bout getting some angle 75x50mm/4mm the same lenght as the rear chromed rail and simply drilling holes in the angle(50mm side) the same as the mounting holes of the rail and bolting it inbetween the chrome rail and the table top.
There's enough room for a 4mm offset for the button on which the fence slides on.
That way you'll have a 75mm lip(minus rail, 30mm) in which to drill holes to mount a rear table off've.

burn
15th Oct 2005, 09:46 AM
Thanks Harry, I like that idea for mounting the table support.

Burn

markharrison
15th Oct 2005, 05:48 PM
They are light and strong, easily strong enough for your requirements. The only disadvantage is the inability to *easily* put matching mitre guide slots into the top surface. I can think of a number of workarounds for this though.

You actually don't want to try and line up these mitre slots in the outfeed table. They are never going to match. If you think about it, they don't need to line up either. Once you've gone that far in the cut you are already past the leading edge of the blade and possibly past the trailing edge of the blade.

You just need to make an over size slot for the the mitre guage to slide into.

Otherwise there is a lot of merit in this idea.

burn
15th Oct 2005, 07:07 PM
Mark,

I think MrFixIt was referring to cutting out two sections of a hollow core door and then glueing in a solid piece of timber, into which one would rout grooves to accept the mitre slides (oversize as you point out).

To be honest, my plan is to use Harry72's idea of 75x50x4mm angle and insert the 50mm side of the angle between the rear fence rail and the table. I will go with building my own tortion box and have it attached to the saw's cabinet, perhaps with some legs if I feel it's needed (remember I have a gerry-built concrete floor). The reason for going with my own tortion box is that I can make it to exactly the size I want (and I can get cheap C-D 12mm ply). If I used a hollow core door then I would need to re-frame it to match the width of the saw.

I WILL post pictures of the job when I get to it in the next weekend or two.

Burn

Harry72
15th Oct 2005, 09:57 PM
Once you've gone that far in the cut you are already past the leading edge of the blade and possibly past the trailing edge of the blade.
Thats unless you have the mitre guide backwards to cut wide boards like small table tops or wide shelfs.

burn
15th Nov 2005, 08:58 PM
Inspired by a project from the MOST EXCELLENT WoodworkingAtHome
DVD magazine (issue #10), I made an outfeed extension table
for my tablesaw. The saw is the, Taiwanese manufactured, Mao
Shan TSC10-HB - a 3HP, 10" cabinet saw with additional router
wing. This appears to be the same as the Grizzly 1023S saw.

The outfeed extension table is a torsion box made out of
12mm C-D quality ply. The torsion box is 1490 x 300 x 38mm.
Not particularly deep at a 300mm, but sufficient enough for
small to medium sized ripping I'm likely to do (if I need to rip
longer pieces I will use outfeed stands). I wasn't able to add a
deeper folding section to outfeed table due to space constraints
in my shed. Perhaps when I get a new shed, I can add a folding
extension table!

Where the mitre tracks on the saw exit the table top, I routed a
dado just a little wider and deeper than the mitre tracks of the
saw so that the mitre gauge could exit the saw table top without
obstruction. There are evenly spaced ribs inside the torsion box,
but where the mitre track dado's are routed, I tripled up on
the ribs.

Mounted on the rear of my saw is a chrome plated rail upon
which the rear of the Biesemeyer fence rides. At a wise person's
suggestion, I purchased some 75 x 75mm, 4mm angle iron and cut
one side down to 50mm. With mounting holes drilled, the lower
side was directly placed against the side of saw's table top and
the rear chrome rail was remounted (bolts going through the rail
then angle iron).

With a strong and stable platform (wide section of angle iron),
I was able to mount the torsion box with additional support via
38mm square hardwood bracing. You should note that this bracing
is screwed into the torsion box where the tripled up ribs are.

I waxed the top of the torsion box with Ubeaut's Traditional Wax.

Picture 00 shows the angle iron mounted on the rear of the
saw. Note the chrome rail.

Picture 01 shows the completed outfeed extension complete with
routed dados to accept the mitre gauge.

Picture 02 shows the bracing which supports the outfeed
extension.

Pictures 03 and 04 show close ups of the angle iron and
bracing.

Picture 05 show the mitre dados.

Picture 06 shows the 'completed' table.

burn
15th Nov 2005, 08:59 PM
Last two (05 and 06)

dazzler
15th Nov 2005, 09:25 PM
Like a bought one.

cheers

dazzler

numbat
15th Nov 2005, 09:38 PM
Great work Burn.

Cheers

Harry72
16th Nov 2005, 12:13 AM
Worked a treat Burn!