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View Full Version : Laminated Rolling Pin - Part B (Another one for Midge)



Donnie
31st Mar 2006, 01:08 AM
For BitingMigdge and others who like to solve problems:

Those of you who were checking the board last spring will remember BitingMidge's great brain work in figuring out how to laminate to produce a rolling pin as pictured below. Well here's part B of the original question:

Instead of inserting a separate piece in the kerf, what would be the resulting design if we started with two blanks, say one of maple and the other purple heart and after making the first saw cut on both blanks, we would just swap one of the pieces and reglue. (repeat for the remaining 3 slices).???

Mmmmmm......:confused: :confused: :confused:

Donnie

DanP
31st Mar 2006, 10:53 AM
what would be the resulting design if we started with two blanks, say one of maple and the other purple heart and after making the first saw cut on both blanks, we would just swap one of the pieces and reglue. (repeat for the remaining 3 slices).???

Only one way to find out mate. Post pics when you're done.;)

Dan

Donnie
31st Mar 2006, 11:08 AM
You under estimate the power of the "Midge Mind". (This way seems a lot easier and faster than actually doing it.)

Think I'll wait for the master's comments first. It may be a bust.

Donnie

CameronPotter
31st Mar 2006, 11:34 AM
What do you swap after the first cut?

i.e. I understand what you mean for part 1. Laminate two bits of wood on an angle, but then you cut that in two at an angle (then what do you replace it with)? Another plain piece of wood? A piece of wood that was glued up and cut in the reverse of the piece you are using (ie the left over bits)...

Please explai further.

Cheers

Cam

bitingmidge
31st Mar 2006, 12:08 PM
:o :o :o

I'm not sure that I'm quite as clever as all that!

I haven't had a chance to think about it, but my gut feeling is the obvious that one would think one would get a chequer (checker) board or harlequin effect, the more cuts the more chequered it becomes, but, that isn't what's going to happen wihtout a good deal of manipulation.

Firstly, you'd have two blanks (from cutting the two original pieces upside-down), so when you cut the second time, cut the second pair of blanks in the opposite way and stick them back together.

Note the two blanks are identical, but have to be treated as though they are mirror images, so if you make a cut horizontally on one, you'd have to make a vertical cut on the other...(I think this is already getting too hard to nut out..race you to build one!)

I think if you stopped at that, you could work it so you got a sort of wavy splice, then if you could stop yourself going insane long enough, you could do repeat the process twice more, and you should get a harlequin bit in the middle of the splice.

See, I just use unitelligable babble so that after I've done it, no matter what the outcome, I can just say "see it's exactly as I said!"

Cheers,

P
:D

CameronPotter
31st Mar 2006, 02:00 PM
:o :o :o

I'm not sure that I'm quite as clever as all that!

...

See, I just use unitelligable babble so that after I've done it, no matter what the outcome, I can just say "see it's exactly as I said!"


Sounds pretty clever to me... :D

macca2
31st Mar 2006, 03:15 PM
I have done something similar with the bottom one of the three pens

Cheers
Macca

Skew ChiDAMN!!
31st Mar 2006, 08:20 PM
If I follow what you're asking, it looks roughly like this.

bitingmidge
31st Mar 2006, 10:23 PM
Well done! That's what I was trying to describe!

Cheers,

P

Donnie
5th Apr 2006, 11:44 AM
:(
Well, decided to give it a go and I am less than satisfied with the results. It was exactly as Skew ChiDamn<SCRIPT type=text/javascript> vbmenu_register("postmenu_286603", true); </SCRIPT> had indicated in the cad drawing. (see below) Besides not having much visual impact, notice how the length of the walnut cones vary (dramatically) on the right hand end. I didn't take into account that I this end was getting shorter and shorter with each cut.

Anyway, it was a learning experience.

Donnie

CameronPotter
5th Apr 2006, 11:49 AM
Thanks for posting the results. Good point about the shortening due to kerf...

Oh well.

Cam

bitingmidge
5th Apr 2006, 11:55 AM
Donnie,

That's what I was trying to explain so clumsily above: to get a more complex pattern, you need to make at least two more cuts.

With every cut the kerf causes more grief, the simplest way to overcome that would be to get a third colour veneer of the same thickness as the saw kerf, then you'd be on your way to having a quite spectacular product.

I've been planning to do that since the first thread, but using a single light colour with a dark veneer in the kerf.

The possibilities are endless, just keep gluing cutting and having fun!

cheers,

P

Skew ChiDAMN!!
5th Apr 2006, 12:41 PM
The orig. concept's invariably stunning, even when some cuts are a bit... welll... "off."

I poorly aped the first pin, it was gone before I could blink, claimed by a relly. So I made another using lessons learnt... it also disappeared. :rolleyes: Made a few pens (now there's where getting it accurate really counts!) all of which practically flew out the door. Even the obvious futches.

Amazing stuff considering that, frankly, none have been particularly well executed! :D

CameronPotter
5th Apr 2006, 12:51 PM
Moral to the story - if you want to keep it, do a REALLY bad job! :D