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cedar n silky
5th Nov 2006, 08:03 PM
I found this piece of timber down in the shed, and i thought "Iwonder what that is"?:p I put it through the band saw, and it had this funny smell. It had all these bark inclusions, and then I spotted a faded black texta saying "huon Pine $45". I recolect now a friend gave it to me before he left for Melbourne a few years ago. So here is the result!:) The bark inclusions are a bit of a problem, and seriously compromise the turning, but the grain is superb as you can see. would have liked to have turned them a bit thinner, but I think they would have blown apart. Iam going to post another thread regarding problems I am having finishing these items.:confused:

EX's Timber
5th Nov 2006, 08:11 PM
They look very nice, love the grain in them

cedar n silky
5th Nov 2006, 08:18 PM
I meant to add this photo to show you what I meant about bark inclusions!:eek: While I am at it, the problem I am having is the fine scratch marks in the finish. On the lips of the bowls, the friction polish comes up mirror perfect. I thought i was doing a good job on the sanding working up the grades to 1000 grit:confused: . And everything looks really well sanded, until I buff up the polish. Am I still not sanding thoroughly enough? Can you over buff? Am i putting too much cream on the rag, it's all a bit challenging. I am almost there, but I am doing something wrong. Also , I have trouble finishing down in the bottom of the bowl. I end up with a little dimple, or a sanded area around the dimple, and yes, a few scratch marks!:mad: I'm getting there, but seeing as I am playing with some pretty serious wood, I want to do it justice!:D

Skew ChiDAMN!!
5th Nov 2006, 09:01 PM
I like the inclusions, they add character to what is otherwise a fairly bland wood. The real appeal behind Huon is it's smell... which you lose once you finish it! Great for inlaid panels (colour-wise) or lining boxes (smell-wise) but not normally my choice for larger items.

Your bowls, on the other hand, are quite the exception! Bloody lovely! :)

As for your finish, no matter what you do fine scratches are a bugbear when hand-sanding. You got a little rotary sander to mount in a battery drill or that free-wheels in a bearing on a handle? IMHO they're the easiest way to remove these little beggars. ;)

Skewpid
5th Nov 2006, 11:26 PM
They look bloody nice mate!:)

I just love that Huon smell . . mmmm

Keep up the good work!

TTIT
6th Nov 2006, 12:40 AM
On the lips of the bowls, the friction polish comes up mirror perfect. I thought i was doing a good job on the sanding working up the grades to 1000 grit:confused: . And everything looks really well sanded, until I buff up the polish. Am I still not sanding thoroughly enough? Can you over buff? Am i putting too much cream on the rag, it's all a bit challenging. I am almost there, but I am doing something wrong.
You might find that it's the 'features' in the timber - thats why it's OK on the lip - no chunks missing to bump over. Personally, I never use friction polish on anything with holes/cracks etc anymore - just too hard to get a really good finish. Danish oil is much better on this type of work.



Also , I have trouble finishing down in the bottom of the bowl. I end up with a little dimple, or a sanded area around the dimple, and yes, a few scratch marks!:mad: I'm getting there, but seeing as I am playing with some pretty serious wood, I want to do it justice!:DAs Skew said, power sanding gets rid of the dimple or pip quickly and easily. I haven't had much luck with a rotary sander here, doesn't get enough rotational movement to work over the very centre.

cedar n silky
6th Nov 2006, 04:42 AM
Thanks Skew. I do have a rotary sander, and a free wheeling sander, which I am learning to use, dut I used finer grits by hand, which probably created the problem. Not sure how fine they go up to in velcro backed paper, but the finest I can get is 600 grit. Maybe that is as fine as I need to go?
Thanks TTIT. Yes I suspected the little holes and inclusions may have been part of the problem. Thanks for the tip. Do you use a premium quality danish oil specially for fine woodwork and only sourced at specialty wood work stores, or is all danish pretty much the same? And any tips on using the product would be appreciated!
Thanks Skewpid and djstimber. Appreciate your comments.:)

cedar n silky
6th Nov 2006, 04:53 AM
"But there are two finishes that are easy to apply and look good from the beginning... our sponsor's Shellawax and a good Danish Oil, such as Rustin's. Acceptable finishes with minimum effort, although of course they look better with more effort".
Thanks Skew- got this on the other thread!:D

OGYT
6th Nov 2006, 08:13 AM
Cedar, these are just suggestions... they're my way... not necessarily the right way.:rolleyes:
First off, make sure you have a good, bright, incandescant light, so's you can glance it across the surface. If you don't have a bright light, you can't see that you've got all the previous grit scratches away. I've found this one of the most important steps in sanding. Any of those cheap clip-on lights will work. I use a 100 watt bulb, about 50cm distance.
I do my sanding on the outside of the bowl as soon as it's shaped the way I want it, and before I hollow out the inside. I let the lathe do the work, and don't get in a hurry. Too much speed makes too much heat, which makes too many checks once you start sanding the inside.
When I finish with a grit, I use an airgun to blow the dust off (between each grit, and if you can, reverse rotation, if you can't reverse, don't worry about it), then go to the next grit. When I get out a fresh piece of sandpaper, I rake the grit side across a sharp edge on my lathe bed to lose the high spots (there's always a little oversized grit on the sheet). I sand down to 400 grit, and when I'm doin' the 320 and 400, I don't use much pressure at all. After the 400, I go to 0000 steel wool, lightly, and then to brown paper sack... (kraft paper)... it's equivalent to about 600 grit. Then I apply the primary finish to the outside. If I use a bowl steady, the wheels don't mar it enough that buffing won't fix it. :D
When I finish sanding the outside, I then do the inside hollowing.
Then I sand the inside the same way, and apply the finish.
Next, I change the bowl around and finish the bottom.
Buffing: When I first started buffing, I always used too much pressure. :eek: That causes heat, and has a tendency to melt the finish. Light pressure on the buffing wheel is much better, and ya gotta keep the piece moving. Tripoli is the first buff abrasive I use, then white diamond, then carnauba. (four different wheels) (If it's a tool handle or something that I don't want slick as snot, I use beeswax instead of carnauba.)
Now that's my perfect way (tongue in cheek, here):D .
Sometimes I take shortcuts, and I get those little pesky scratches that I hope no one else can see.:(
Hope this gives you some ideas. Just an ole man's ramblings...:p

Caveman
6th Nov 2006, 05:37 PM
Hey Cedar - nice job - ditto the others comments. I really like the 'inclusions' - adds nice character to the pieces.

I too never go finer than 600grit - because that's the finest I can get, but I reckon that unless the piece is for a serious display in a gallery or competition, then not much point - don't what the general thought is out there?

Certainly no galleries or comps in this part the of the world anyway - I just like to make good ol utilitarian bowls.

ss_11000
6th Nov 2006, 05:47 PM
for bowls and such, i've been tought not to go over 400 then go EEE, but i find i get way better results going up to 1500 then EEE. you can get the finer rotary sander grits from ubeaut. excellent looking bowls btw.

EX's Timber
6th Nov 2006, 06:04 PM
Not sure how fine they go up to in velcro backed paper, but the finest I can get is 600 grit.

Ubeaut (http://www.ubeaut.com.au/ubhome.htm) and Carroll's (http://www.cws.au.com/cgi/index.cgi/shopfront/view_by_category?category_id=1107144920) both sell the higher grits all ready to go

Do you use a premium quality danish oil specially for fine woodwork and only sourced at specialty wood work stores, or is all danish pretty much the same? And any tips on using the product would be appreciated!

I think you will find that most of us use the Rustins (http://www.cws.au.com/cgi/index.cgi/shopfront/view_by_category?category_id=1107144873). All of the different oils have a different makeup of the mixes. Some are too light and some will darken the timber to much.

cedar n silky
6th Nov 2006, 07:28 PM
Thanks Ogyt: I appreciate your "ramblings" they are very relevant. I definately neeed to reveiw my lighting situation, I know!!:confused: I think that is half the problem, and the other "pearls of wisdom" are the other half.:D
Thanks Caveman: I definately agree on the utilitarian stuff, but i just want to try and do a "shmick" finish. This forum is jut great for avoiding all the "trial by error" stuff. Or at least some of it. Youve got to learn by your mistakes to some degree. Not going for galleries or comps, but it's nice giving presents, isn't it!? I haven't had to buy a present for someone in a long time!!:D My daughter has the best collection of bowls, boxes and picture frames I have made! I gave her a car once, and the following year some tools to fix it with. That made a change!!:)
Thanks SS11000:tips and comments much appreciated
Thanks DJS Timber:I appreciate the advice, and will add the danish oil to my growing list of finishes!:)

ubeaut
6th Nov 2006, 10:21 PM
Sorry for the blatant add but I just can't help myself.

Say goodbye to sanding marks for ever with..... THE ORIGINAL Vic Wood Rotary Sander (http://www.ubeaut.com.au/rotary1.htm)

For 15 odd years I have been using, recommending and selling these amazing and innovative sanders. Up until now they have been one of only a couple of products not made by us that I believed in and would sell.

I can now reveal that U-Beaut Enterprises have recently taken over ownership and manufacturing of the Rotary Sander from the innovative inventor and previous manufacturer Kevin Davidson who has recently retired from this side of his business.

Cheers - Neil :)

Skew ChiDAMN!!
6th Nov 2006, 11:06 PM
I can now reveal that U-Beaut Enterprises have recently taken over ownership and manufacturing of the Rotary Sander from the innovative inventor and previous manufacturer Kevin Davidson who has recently retired from this side of his business.

http://www.ubeaut.biz/thumbupwink.gif

cedar n silky
7th Nov 2006, 10:05 AM
I think you are allowed that lattitude Neil. I did buy the Vic wood rotary sander at the Brizzy wood work show earlier this year, (along with a lathe, chisels etc!), and have it amongst an arsenel of sanding and finishing gear now, and am learning to master them all. I agree it is an excellent product! And I am sure once i have it fine tuned it (or me) I will be happy with the outcome. Or will I? Striving for perfection is a curse!!:D Woodturning is a bit like owning a boat, although I won't go along with the quote "The happiest day of your life is the day you buy a boat, and the day you sell it" - yet!:D

rsser
10th Nov 2006, 08:01 AM
Yeah, Huon is soft and liable to scratch marks from lower grits showing through at the very end. Frustrating.

An alt've is wet hand sanding with wet and dry, and for the nipple hand sanding too with the lathe stopped.

IMHO DO darkens Huon too much and I just use sanding sealer finished with wax.

But you've done well with those inclusions. I did a square platter with bark inclusions. Only when mounting it in the Cole jaws to clean up the spigot did she crack (too much pressure) - and then in the sound wood. I'd been doing the old CA and dust filler routine in the bark while shaping it.