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Melbournechris
17th May 2009, 12:27 PM
Hi there friends,

I am currently looking at a site where the quotes are in two sections....

WET SAWN & KILN DRIED DRESSED

Can you please explain the difference.....The price for one!

Regards,

Chris

Stopper
17th May 2009, 05:36 PM
Hi there friends,

I am currently looking at a site where the quotes are in two sections....

WET SAWN & KILN DRIED DRESSED

Can you please explain the difference.....The price for one!

Regards,

Chris


Wet sawn refers to sawn timber that has not been processed any further. It is fresh from the saw.
Kiln dried refers to the same timber after it has been spaced out with dolly sticks, placed in a kiln and dried (moisture removed) which, in simple terms, makes it more stable for use.
Dressed means it has been machined to remove the rough saw marks giving a smoother surface.

Wet sawn will be cheapest and as further processing is done (kiln drying and dressing) the value of the timber increases.

cheers
Steve

Melbournechris
17th May 2009, 05:39 PM
Thank you so much for that.

So for use in the outdoors (retaining wall ect), It should be kiln dried dressed? Is this correct?

Regards,

Chris

mic-d
17th May 2009, 05:51 PM
Thank you so much for that.

So for use in the outdoors (retaining wall ect), It should be kiln dried dressed? Is this correct?

Regards,

Chris

No way. For non-engineered (small) retaining walls you should use treated pine minimum H3 treatment or class1 hardwood if you must. Both used roughsawn.
For walls needing an engineer, you use what they tell you
Cheers
Michael

weisyboy
17th May 2009, 05:51 PM
rought sawn timber can and usualy dose cup, bow twist and split.

air dryed timber has already doen this and the seller threw away all the bad bits or resawed it.

kiln dryed timber has been dryed quickly in large stacks that reduces the cup, bow, twist that you get increasing the amount of useable timber but it isnt cheap to run a kiln.

dressed timber has been run threw a planning machine to produce flat smoth timber.

Skew ChiDAMN!!
17th May 2009, 06:28 PM
One way to look at it is: Wet Sawn is firewood. It may be in big pieces, but it's still just firewood.

Everything else is just the more select pieces picked out of the firewood pile and processed further. (Nowadays, with quality woods becoming scarcer, more & more is being picked out and less "junk" being left behind. What used to be deemed fit only for pulp-mills is being used for building houses! :oo:)

For garden edging, etc. wet sawn is fine... provided you don't expect it to last for years. For anything structural, including retaining walls, you want better quality.

weisyboy
17th May 2009, 06:41 PM
For garden edging, etc. wet sawn is fine... provided you don't expect it to last for years. green red ironbark will last just as long as dry red ironbark. how green it is has nothig to do with its life span For anything structural, including retaining walls, you want better quality.whethere is is green/dry, rough/dressed it makes no diferance to the grade of teh timber.

you can buy top grade furniture timber rough sawn mutch cheeper than dressed and its still just as good. it just needs a little work.

Skew ChiDAMN!!
17th May 2009, 06:44 PM
I was speaking in general. :)

As for grading, you're right. But in my experience wet sawn has rarely been graded. It's a "you get what you get" type of thing.

That's one of the differences between selling timbers as rough sawn and as wet sawn. :wink: (Or it was when I was a kid, anyway.)

weisyboy
17th May 2009, 06:53 PM
depends where u come from i guess.

wet sawn and rough sawn are more common than not teh same thing. where dry rough sawn is dry. unless a grade is listed (ie: select grade) than u get what you are given. you can however buy select grade rough sawn wet timber.

if u are planing on making anyhting in teh next 12 mounths then buy seasoned wheather it be kiln or air. if u have space and time then buy green and u will end up saving a fortune.

Stopper
17th May 2009, 06:55 PM
I was speaking in general. :)

As for grading, you're right. But in my experience wet sawn has rarely been graded. It's a "you get what you get" type of thing.

That's one of the differences between selling timbers as rough sawn and as wet sawn. :wink: (Or it was when I was a kid, anyway.)

weisy is right. Wet sawn (aka rough sawn or green off saw) has nothing to do with the grade of the timber. You can get Class 1 top quality wet sawn timber ready to go. It is not firewood. :no:
Though wet sawn it is given a strength grading and is often used in structural framing.

It sounds like Melbournechris is after something for landscaping. If so you can use a treated timber suitable for ground contact or untreated timber that is durable when in contact with the ground. eg tallowood, grey ironbark, etc.

cheers
Steve

Melbournechris
17th May 2009, 07:56 PM
It sounds like Melbournechris is after something for landscaping. If so you can use a treated timber suitable for ground contact or untreated timber that is durable when in contact with the ground. eg tallowood, grey ironbark, etc.

cheers
Steve[/quote]


Thanks to all...

Steve, you are spot on. I am building a retaining wall with treated pine posts and plinth....150X25. Bunnings has got 5.4m lengths for $8:75..... It is not going to be seen as I am then going to put on Blueboard, then a render......So, keep the ideas coming.


Reagrds,
Chris

weisyboy
17th May 2009, 07:58 PM
what is the wall retaining.

25mm is not strong enough to support weight of soil or rock.

Melbournechris
17th May 2009, 08:01 PM
It is going to be a 600mm high retaining wall using prob 4X150mm treated pine, but to answer your question only 300mm is just earth soil and the rest will be a garden bed soil....

mic-d
17th May 2009, 08:03 PM
It is going to be a 600mm high retaining wall using prob 4X150mm treated pine, but to answer your question only 300mm is just earth soil and the rest will be a garden bed soil....



You need to use 3 x 200 x 50 H3 pine sleepers

Cheers
Michael

weisyboy
17th May 2009, 08:04 PM
you need to use 50mm thick sleepers.

you can buy 200mm x 50mm x 2.4m sleepers for $13 at bunnings here in brisbane they are the best bet for your application.

you will not be able to buy kiln dryed dressed treated pine.

Melbournechris
17th May 2009, 08:12 PM
Thank you so much for that.....There are a few places in my area to try get quotes....

Hey, while I have you. To also secure the treated to the colourbond fence, i should use hex screws?? Will I have to pre drill timber??

Regards,

Chris

mic-d
17th May 2009, 08:15 PM
Thank you so much for that.....There are a few places in my area to try get quotes....

Hey, while I have you. To also secure the treated to the colourbond fence, i should use hex screws?? Will I have to pre drill timber??

Regards,

Chris

Yes and no, and use screws with a timber screw thread. They should drill through the tin too.

Cheers
Michael

weisyboy
17th May 2009, 08:23 PM
you are not using the fence to hold up the wall are you?

you need roofing scresws to attach the timber to tin securely. the ones meant for timber battons not steel ones

Melbournechris
17th May 2009, 08:26 PM
you are not using the fence to hold up the wall are you?

you need roofing scresws to attach the timber to tin securely. the ones meant for timber battons not steel ones

No, not holding it up....

So, one side of the "planter box" is the colourbod fencing and the other is the retaining wall, I am about to build. I just want to put treated pine plinth X2 up the fence to build up the height of the box.

Cheers,

Chris

mic-d
17th May 2009, 08:29 PM
I think you're just copying my answers weisy and running then through a spell mischecker:p:D:D

Cheers
Michael

weisyboy
17th May 2009, 08:34 PM
youa re copying me before iv finished writing it.

i would not be using the coulorbond fence as a planter box side. fertaliser and watter will make short work of the tin. i sugest u build a wall along the bakc aswell.

Bleedin Thumb
18th May 2009, 01:57 PM
Mic-d you keep saying H3 treated pine.....you meant to say H4 right?:wink:

H4 is the correct level of treatment for inground use.

and yes 50mm minimum thickness but you will need to support the wall at 800 centres with uprights unless you don't mind a wavy wall. If you try to stretch it to 1.2m centres you will find the boards will warp between the posts.

rhancock
18th May 2009, 02:28 PM
Most of the info you need is on this info sheet from Timber Qld.

mic-d
18th May 2009, 04:13 PM
Mic-d you keep saying H3 treated pine.....you meant to say H4 right?:wink:

H4 is the correct level of treatment for inground use.

and yes 50mm minimum thickness but you will need to support the wall at 800 centres with uprights unless you don't mind a wavy wall. If you try to stretch it to 1.2m centres you will find the boards will warp between the posts.

I did say H3 didn't I? I can't even say I meant H4, but I did mean the appropriate level for in-ground use. Looks like the neurone that stored the correct information has died, along with many others:(:(. Don't believe a word I say anymore!

Cheers
Michael

Ivor
18th May 2009, 06:02 PM
Depending where you are, try considering secondhand rail sleepers. Tough hardwood been in the ground awhile already, just my personal preference I hate treated timber. Too many nasty chemicals!

timbertalk
22nd May 2009, 08:49 PM
I thought H4 was minimum for ground contact (NSW). In Qld, H5 is preferred/minimum?

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