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Gingermick
20th Jun 2009, 05:26 PM
G'day, we have a bull mastiff cross who is a very good natured dog. But when he gets out of the yard and the kids are outside, he becomes aggressive toward people he doesn't know.
He just bit a bloke up the road and this isn't the first time. Last time it was a teenager and he didn't break the skin, but today he took out a large chunk. He's been desexed, but we dont know what else to do, short of keeping the gate shut. Maybe a running lead, but that wont stop it, just assist keeping him in. Does anyone have any advice to help us out. He's a good guard dog and good with our kids, but if this keeps up we'll have to put him down. He's 1 and a half. Until a month ago we had another dog, 8 years old who was the alpha male, but he disappeared, and since then this one has been acting out, and these 2 incidents have occurred. Help please!

watson
20th Jun 2009, 05:55 PM
G'day Mick,
I'm not a Dog Whisperer by any means, but I'd get another dog quickly. He's lost the boss, and probably doesn't know what to do.
The other dog will distract him enough for a while until he works it out.

Sprog
20th Jun 2009, 11:51 PM
.
He just bit a bloke up the road and this isn't the first time. Last time it was a teenager and he didn't break the skin, but today he took out a large chunk.

The dog HAS to be put down.

If you get another dog then get some help in training it, it is just not fair on the dog to let them get out of hand.

echnidna
20th Jun 2009, 11:55 PM
I agree

Woodwould
21st Jun 2009, 12:21 AM
I too would have any dog destroyed that bit anyone once. :C

If he bites again and the injured person sues (the dog, having a prior record of biting), the judge will throw the book at you. Your insurers won't want to know and you could lose a substantial amount.

Gingermick
21st Jun 2009, 10:07 AM
We can't do that, it would break my baby girls heart, particularly after losing the other dog. I think he was trying to protect them but he didn't realise he didn't have to. Dr Dog (http://www.drdogsbehaviorsolutions.com/#order) maybe worth a try, and 40 bucks is better than the alternative.He's only 18months old so that's not too old to train properly, surely.
He has a very, very strong protective instinct; he doesn't sleep on his bed (Hessian bed) at night, but on the ground outside our window.

glen boulton
21st Jun 2009, 11:24 AM
it may break your little girls heart... but imagine the hearts of the next little girls parents that it bites. and imagine the mental scaring of two people so far... and irreparable scaring of the victim.

sorry i have seen a mates 7 year old daughter go through 5 lots of surgery. and my mate and his wife are absolutey destroyed. yes i am very opinionated about this. i used to breed bull Arabs so i know a little about dogs and a little about attacks.

do your self ..and your family...and someone else's family a favor and get it sorted. i know exactly what i would do in your situation. i just hope it's not going to take another incident(the courts have a different word for it) to a stranger or FAMILY MEMBER to make you make a decision.

i feel for you, i'm glad i'm not in your boots. you have allot to think about. and yes the comment on the tv all to often is "it's never been like that before. he normally loves the kids!"

EX's Timber
21st Jun 2009, 11:36 AM
But when he gets out of the yard

When you say this, are you meaning that he is not on your property any more and not restrained in any way.

If this is the case, then you are probably breaking the law.

wheelinround
21st Jun 2009, 11:39 AM
Mick what if its your little girl he has next bitten its the bread
With laws such as they are here in NSW once would have been to often not sure about QLD

RufflyRustic
21st Jun 2009, 11:51 AM
Sounds like the dog is missing his companion and going overboard 'protecting' his family, what used to be a 2-dog job.

My suggestions:
1. Get another companion dog
2. Talk to a qualified and experienced dog trainer to see what you can do to re-train your beloved dog.

If you get help fast, hopefully you won't have to go the path of getting rid of him.

Good luck
Wendy

Gingermick
21st Jun 2009, 05:50 PM
Sounds like the dog is missing his companion and going overboard 'protecting' his family, what used to be a 2-dog job.

I think that might be right.
I also got a number from the pet shop and got this bloke to come round and see if he could help. By god there is a difference already. He responded so well to some appropriate firm guidance. I took him to a park / playground this arvo and walked him around past people, I checked him a few times with the choker but not much. He walked just beside or behind me and behaved better than ever. We keep this up and we will have a safe dog very soon,
Thanks for all your replies. :2tsup:

Lignin
23rd Jun 2009, 11:29 PM
Mick,
What everyone has said about your responsibilities and liabilities if the dog bites again are all true.
It sounds as though the dog was insufficiently socialised as a pup. but at 18 mo, it is not too late.Was it just "play biting" ( a dog his size can do a hell of a lot of damage even when "mouthing" something),or was the dog defending his pack or territory??
The trainer seems to be doing some good, so keep it up, and reinforce everything that he is doing.
I would be wary of getting another dog as it may cause more problems than it solves.Your bloke has suddenly become #1 dog and may not be prepared to give up the title.
Dogs are pack animals, and your bloke is exerting his new fouind dominance, so you and the rest of the family have to put the dog in its place---LAST in the scheme of things, and subservient to other humans of any size!!
I spent 35 yrs in Vet practice, and with few exceptions,rarely found a dog that couldn't be trained, although not all could be trusted.

Invest in a Halti collar and a muzzle, and keep the gates LOCKED until the dog learns some manners.
Good luck,
Jim

Waldo
23rd Jun 2009, 11:35 PM
The dog HAS to be put down.

I strongly disagree.

Never be too hasty to jump on the kill idea. Icecream Lid has done the right thing by his mate and his mate has responded in love and obedience to his friend. Onya Icecream Lid. :2tsup:

tea lady
23rd Jun 2009, 11:40 PM
:oo::C It sounds like its trying to be the boss of the pack and protecting everyone. Don't let it sleep under your window if you think it is doing that to protect you. I had to put my little dog in the laundry at night (even though she is "only" a jack russle, they can have dominence issues. Now she won't sleep anywhere else at night. I think she feels liek she is officially "off duty" when she is in there.) Taking the dog out is prolly a good idea too, so it can know that people are OK. Good luck. It is a big dog not to have under control.:C

TP1
24th Jun 2009, 01:29 AM
It is a serious problem, but your dog seems to be acting out of fear. Possibly less confident since the companion went missing. The only thing that could help is some intensive training, or possibly another dog.

I know this may sound a bit off beat, but we had similar problems with our British Bull dog. We called a professional trainer who really changed everything, and in a very short timeframe.

The bull dog is still a bit of a bugger in that he likes to be the centre of attention, but he doesn't bite now and he comes when he's called.

I think that if you know that your dog doesn't have a naturally vicious disposition, then training (by a real pro) could help.

Gingermick
24th Jun 2009, 09:27 AM
yeah, the bloke that came around on sunday was a pro. He's been getting walks since then, as before he tried to drag us and that was bloody hard work and not relaxing for anyone. Now he walks beside or behind me with just an hour spent with the trainer. Very good results so far and I'm quite confident we can train him (With help of course) to stay in the yard unless he's called.

Gingermick
24th Jun 2009, 09:34 AM
the next little girls parents that it bites. !

He bit the father, not the girl.

Gingermick
28th Sep 2009, 02:43 PM
He's now been put to sleep. :C He was a brilliant guard dog and a wonderful mate but his protective instinct was so great that he was a danger. He didn't savage the people he bit, just nipped them, but as he was so big he did damage.
We'll all miss him dearly, but it was for the greater good that he be put to rest. If we hadn't taken him as a pup he would've been put down, but he had nearly 2 good years with a family who loved him a treated him well.
time for a small dog.

Waldo
28th Sep 2009, 02:45 PM
Very sorry to read that Gingermick. :console:

Lignin
28th Sep 2009, 04:04 PM
Mick,
Sorry the big fella had to go, but beware of small dogs.They are frequently more unreliable than the big blokes, 'cept when they latch on, they don't do as much damage.
After 30-odd years of handling all shapes and sizes, I DO NOT LIKE LITTLE DOGS!!! I've been bitten much more often by "boot rooters" than normal sized mutts.

watson
28th Sep 2009, 04:04 PM
:C
Sorry to hear all that Mick.

Allan at Wallan
28th Sep 2009, 05:44 PM
Sorry to hear the end result Mick.

My wife had a Maltese Schitzu cross and was the most intelligent
adorable little dog we have ever had. Would not hurt a fly ...
but unexpectedly one day bit our friend's daughter on the face
and neck requiring seven stitches.

Who knows what goes through their mind at a time like that
not to mention the young girl's trauma.

I have so far persuaded my wife not to get any more dogs.

Allan

Gingermick
28th Sep 2009, 05:50 PM
thanks Allan, that's a pretty awful story and what we were desperate to avoid. I dont think it would have happened but you cant be certain.
It was no fun today and I hope I don't have to do it again, and I hope no one else has to, it sucks.
thanks everyone for your regards.

glen boulton
28th Sep 2009, 10:46 PM
I am sad for you and your family with having to make that call. I have been there and it really hurts. Pets have a way of getting into your heart. Good luck with your next choice.

tea lady
28th Sep 2009, 11:27 PM
So sorry Mick! Hard to do. My sis had to do it with her dog when she started getting narky in her old age. :C They've got their own logic, but it doesn't always fit with the people.

Maybe a golden retreiver? :)

Gingermick
29th Sep 2009, 07:38 AM
thanks Glen and Annne-marie, he was such a loving animal that when they came around to get him, my middle boy said "no, they're not taking him" and wouldn't let go. They left and I came home from work and his mum explained everything to him and I took sancho to the vet and met the animal control people there.
A golden retriever sounds good.:2tsup:

rotten_66
29th Sep 2009, 11:00 AM
Mick,

This is probably the best in the long run, it may not seem like it now,

Ron

Waldo
29th Sep 2009, 11:03 AM
:aro-u: Oi, a bit of compassion.

Gingermick
3rd Oct 2009, 01:46 PM
SWMBO just bought a gorgeous little 12 week old cocker spaniel. $800 for gods sake. But he's got the kids over the loss which is good. They wont keep away from him.
And I cant see him terrorising the neighborhood.

Lignin
3rd Oct 2009, 02:46 PM
Get him used to having his ears irrigated ASAP.They are VERY prone to chronic ear infections.
Get a GOOD ear cleaner from your Vet and insist that he/she shows you how to put it down the ear canal.
Sorry to be a curmudgeon, but it's better to start early.
I had very few nasty Cockers as patients, so you're not likely to antagonise the neighbours with your new mate.
Enjoy him.

Gingermick
3rd Oct 2009, 06:06 PM
thanks mate, we got a vet visit Free and maybe some steak knives when we bought him with just 1 easy payment of $800 :D
SWMBO will talk to the vet about that then.
Cheers lignin

Gingermick
4th Oct 2009, 07:18 PM
Kids still a bit sad but this bloke has helped.
must have a smudge on the lens

tea lady
4th Oct 2009, 10:25 PM
:2tsup: Isn't he great. Does his tongue fit in his head though? :rolleyes::D

Geoff Dean
5th Oct 2009, 06:36 AM
Mick, you done the right thing twice.

Once, making the hard call.

Twice, replacing him fairly quickly.

Enjoy your new friend.

Well done. :2tsup:

Gingermick
5th Oct 2009, 08:54 AM
:2tsup: Isn't he great. Does his tongue fit in his head though? :rolleyes::D

no trouble there, we just have to pin his ears together when it's meal time to stop them dragging in his food. :)

Thanks Geoff

tea lady
5th Oct 2009, 08:55 AM
no trouble there, we just have to pin his ears together when it's meal time to stop them dragging in his food. :)

thanks geoff:d

pugwash
18th Oct 2009, 01:46 AM
What's his name Mick?

Gingermick
19th Oct 2009, 08:12 PM
Oden, or Odie. Beautiful little thing he is, really good after such an unpleasant series of events.

hughie
18th Dec 2009, 12:32 AM
My suggestions:
1. Get another companion dog
2. Talk to a qualified and experienced dog trainer to see what you can do to re-train your beloved dog.

If you get help fast, hopefully you won't have to go the path of getting rid of him.



Excellent advise,
He 18months old and basically a teenager with more responsibility than he is used to, and less experience to handle it.

The dog is not bad, just struggling to cope his new situation and inexperience dictates he will stuff up.