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  1. #1
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    Default Calculating Roof weight on load bearing wall.

    hi all.
    Im currently planning on how i can best open my kitchen and dining area up to be one. Im still in the saving mode and i know i will need expert advice before i start but im a curious person and wanting to know what i have to deal with.
    I would like to open a wall up. The wall is 8 metres long and im wanting a 6.6 metre opening. It is a load bearing wall supporting terracotta roof tiles and old timber frame. inside the roof, there are timbers vertically propping roof onto another internal parallel wall which is 1.5 metres away. Im guessing the 2 walls share the weight.

    My questions are , what size beam would i need to support this wall?
    How far eigther end must the beam be resting on supports?
    Is there a calculator formula to work out weight placed on beam?
    Would anyone know the dimensions of a steel beam to do similar job.
    my terracotta tiled roof covers an area of 10 by 8 metres.

    Im only getting ideas so i can work out roughly what the lowest ceiling height will be under this beam, Would i need a bulkhead or can i lower my ceiling heights and keep one straight ceiling. I will later be getting proffessional advice before i start the job.

    Thanks for any replies.
    Would the best solution be to find some engineer to pop around and give me quick advice or will they charge hard as if already planning the job?

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  3. #2
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    You'll probably need a fairly substantial Universal Beam for that job, and you may be able to install it inside your roof space with no bulkhead showing below the ceiling. If you strip some tiles you may be able to maneuver it inside the roof, or you may be able to get it up from underneath.

    Go to One Steel and download the pdf. Structural Steel in Housing. Calculate your loads according to details given on page 10, and look under Strutting/Hanging Beam Supporting A Tiled Roof & Ceiling, on page 11.

    An example of the code used: 310UB32.0 means that it's a Universal Beam with a nominal depth of 310mm and it weighs 32.0 kg/metre.

    Of course supporting all that weight may require steel columns, or maybe just a double stud, or HWD post, and possibly new piers underneath them as well. This all has to be designed by an engineer, and don't be too surprised if he goes over what's required by those span tables. They usually like to cover their butts.


  4. #3
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    mick, From reading your post it would seem that the wall you want to remove has no roof props (struts) which take the roof load.

    The roof loads are not supported by all walls and are point loads down to the floor

    If this is the case then the wall is not load bearing but it may be giving lateral strength. Check to see if there are any diagonal braces in the wall.

    They will most likely be metal straps and you can see the ends on top of the wall in the roof space. If this is the case you will need to consult a engineer.

    ps I am assuming the walls are timber.
    Don't force it, use a bigger hammer.

    Timber is what you use. Wood is what you burn.

  5. #4
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    Yeh, it's a bit confusing with a parallel wall only 1.5 metres away. Pics and sketches would help.
    Nevertheless, if he's taking out 6.6 metres of wall between two rooms, chances are that it's carrying something, even if only a ceiling.

    Good point about the possible bracing.


  6. #5
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    Pawnhead is right Mick, pictures would help a lot.

    I have done roof bracing for wall removal and I always made a point of looking at the site before quoting as there are different factors that can affect how the job is to be done. SAFELY
    Don't force it, use a bigger hammer.

    Timber is what you use. Wood is what you burn.

  7. #6
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    Thankyou very much guys.
    Im caught in a bad spot right now as most my possesions are divided over 3 friends garage and i got no idea where my camera is but ill try find it soon. i also cant post on my days of as im missing a few cords for my computer.
    The wall is brick. cavity wall. it is 8 metres long and currently has a 5 metre opening. timber beam but low. divides room up as it is a 2 metre high division in a home with 2.7 metre ceilings.
    I understand the complexity of it as i cant begin to understand how to calculate.
    When we hear the word engineer, alarm bells ring as we think automatically think expensive. I may actually find one to quickly drop past with some ideas for a howard free price.

    Thanks for the time though. ill see if i can manage some shots.

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