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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by auscab View Post
    You saw off the tongues and grooves and keep the thickness at 20mm right ? The board ends up a bit narrower. Sounds great to me . ..... .

    ? Why.

    I would have thought that it was better to keep your options open. Use the T&G's where you need wider panels - table tops, bench sides and top, doors, shelves, etc. For narrower uses cut to size.

    I use a lot of repurposed timber. One worry with floor boards is the nail holes. My solution is to use a plug cutter from Veritas and just drill the holes and glue in a matching plug, aligning and matching wood grain as far as possible. Turns a problem into a feature!


    Cheers

    Graeme

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  3. #17
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    I've done same with some blackbutt floorboards and I can end up with clean, thicknesses stock of about 78x17mm. So its not thick enough for some things but there's plenty of applications that it's fine for and of course in some cases you can laminate a couple of piece together to create thicker stock. My only hesitation in furniture use is that in my experience floorboard stock isn't typically perfectly straight (it doesn't need to be when it's tongue and grooved together and nailed/glued down) and when it gets thin it tends to move over longer lengths so for me it tends to get used in shorter lengths or in applications where the design limits wood movement. Maybe that helps. All the best.

  4. #18
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    Hi, I am currently making some coffee tables out of T&G floor boards. I keep the T&G for the top, and remove the T&G for the edging. The largest table I have made is 1340 x 640mm. The only issue with the top is it can tend to bow a little but I overcome come this by screwing and glueing three pieces of board evenly spaced on the underside of the table. Straightens it nicely. Explore and have some fun with it!

  5. #19
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    Ended up getting it, comes to 18mm after you thicknesser the grooves on the bottom out. Itís beautiful timber, no nail holes and hasnít been sealed it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeCook View Post
    ? Why.

    I would have thought that it was better to keep your options open. Use the T&G's where you need wider panels - table tops, bench sides and top, doors, shelves, etc. For narrower uses cut to size.
    'Cos T/G doesn't give full contact for gluing; only the the top edges of the board and the tongue actually touch, the rest of the profile has 1-2mm of clearance. You can use the T/G profile to glue up if you want to, but it does make it a bit harder to keep things flat.

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    'Cos T/G doesn't give full contact for gluing; only the the top edges of the board and the tongue actually touch, the rest of the profile has 1-2mm of clearance. You can use the T/G profile to glue up if you want to, but it does make it a bit harder to keep things flat.

    Hi Elan

    Your post initially had me baffled, so I did some googling, and then realised that T&G flooring profiles have changed over the last 150 years.


    Traditional Floorboard Profiles

    My experience has been with salvaged floor timber from demolished dwellings usually well over 50 years old and often over 100. Thickness, always imperial, usually ĺ inch, sometimes 1 inch, rarely 1 Tas oak and, once only, 1ľ inch. Timber usually Tas Oak, sometimes only one species of the Tas oak cocktail (eg messmate), sometimes Tas blackwood and occasionally Oyster Bay pine.

    The timber is always flat on top and bottom (no moldings) and the groove is cut into a flat face. Thus the glue surfaces are top and bottom faces of the tongue and the vertical faces above and below the tongue. This actually increases the gluing surface as compared to a butt joint, and as half the glue surfaces are perpendicular to the other glue surfaces, I suspect that it also increases the stiffness of the construct. There is a 1-2 mm gap for surplus glue at the bottom of the groove. See drawing.

    Flooring Profile.jpg


    Modern Flooring Profiles

    For whatever reason, the face below the groove no longer touches the adjacent board. This assymetry is clearly visible in Cbig's original post but I missed it. Oops!


    Comment

    On reflection, I think that I still prefer the traditional profile, but one must use what one has.



    Cheers

    Graeme

  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeCook View Post
    ? Why.

    I would have thought that it was better to keep your options open. Use the T&G's where you need wider panels - table tops, bench sides and top, doors, shelves, etc. For narrower uses cut to size.

    Cheers

    Graeme

    Sorry , I missed this Graeme. Just saw it now.
    I used to be notified well but its not working so well for me anymore.
    I went to Gmail for the forum notifications and its worse than what I once had. The notifications either come through much to late, or they send me false reminders that I already know about .

    Anyway.


    Elan answered it one way . Yep , no full contact for gluing .

    Some people make furniture that's design is half fence construction half floor construction, They use the T&G ,whack something together, and in true dumb Aussie style don't forget to include a picture of your bare feet in the picture of the finished piece somehow.

    Nothing wrong with that way of doing things, if you want to build that sort of thing. Except the feet thing happens too much for my liking.

    Not much strength in gluing up floor boards . And in this case its New Oak floorboards. I would go back to the basics and convert the boards back for their new use in furniture even though its losing some width . It opens up way more possibilities for good true traditional cabinet design . Nothing wrong with narrow boards either . Some great pieces look perfect made from the more narrow sizes. If you look at a traditional Cabinet like Bookcases or desks, and a lot of other stuff. They are made up from lots of properly jointed narrow stuff. The closest something like the T&G shows up is in panel and frame construction . A loose panel that sits in a groove and allows movement.

    Building with second hand Used, nailed, what ever species floor boards, yes, maybe use the T&G .
    Id would not be building proper traditionally jointed furniture from it . But an outdoor coffee table ? doors or what ever to go under cover on my deck or in my man cave / shed . Part of my dream chicken coup . Sure , it would save time and be good.

    Its interesting how little you actually see T&G in fine furniture traditionally . One place you do see it is in longcase clock backs . Done in 3/8 thick boards . Not glued, just nailed like a floor so the T&G is doing whats its intended for.

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by auscab View Post
    Sorry , I missed this Graeme. Just saw it now.

    ......Building with second hand Used, nailed, what ever species floor boards, yes, maybe use the T&G .
    I would not be building proper traditionally jointed furniture from it . But an outdoor coffee table ? doors or what ever to go under cover on my deck or in my man cave / shed . Part of my dream chicken coup . Sure , it would save time and be good. .........

    Hi Auscab

    I am enjoying the debate. So many aspects; so many views.

    I think we will agree to disagree on this one. The ancient repurposed timber frequently has greater widths, finer grain, 100 years drying, and more character than that available from the timber merchants. This all adds up to more character in the resultant fine furniture. If it includes well-crafted repairs - plugs and dutchmen - then so be it. It is what the Japanese call wabi sabi - the history of the item and its materials is all part of the story that the piece tells. So much better than anominity from Ikea.


    Cheers

    Graeme

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeCook View Post
    Hi Auscab

    I am enjoying the debate. So many aspects; so many views.

    I think we will agree to disagree on this one. The ancient repurposed timber frequently has greater widths, finer grain, 100 years drying, and more character than that available from the timber merchants. This all adds up to more character in the resultant fine furniture. If it includes well-crafted repairs - plugs and dutchmen - then so be it. It is what the Japanese call wabi sabi - the history of the item and its materials is all part of the story that the piece tells. So much better than anominity from Ikea.


    Cheers

    Graeme
    I agree with the character part . Just not having to keep the T&G in the boards and being limited by them being there.
    The character on old timber , the patina is great . The problem is its limited to the sizes it comes in . And the limited species range it comes in . And you get a bunch of boards but you dont have leg material the same , or it needs turning so you lose the patina .

    Being good at re creating the look is what I like doing . Build it and make it look real old out of what ever wood they want and to a colour and age that suits what they want . Or what I want .

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