Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 28 of 28

Thread: Big Timber?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Wentworth Falls, NSW
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Sorry if I am late to this conversation, but I had cause to look for some large timber late last year. My normal suppliers stocked nothing at all over 50mm thick in hardwood, but I think there is a good business reason. From what one supplier told me, they have to turn over their stocks and don't have the resources to properly season very thick timber. Most of the product is kiln dried, which effectively limits the thickness to around 50 mm. They pointed me to a timber yard in Western Sydney that stocks unseasoned hardwood.

    See harper timber.com.au. I didn't follow it through, but their website says that have some really solid sizes in a range of timbers.

    I have also visited a recycled timber yard in Geelong (my son-in-law is a regular customer). They had some wonderful timber in large sizes, and I think would mill to size if asked nicely. The timber is reason from very large beams etc from warehouses and wharves etc. The place is called 'Timber Zoo', and you could find them on the web.

    I know these are a long way from where you are, but I think it may pay to hunt around. There are likely to be similar suppliers in Queensland as there is clearly a market for it in the commercial trade. My original starting point was Mathews timber, who shave a branch in Brisbane. It would be worth giving them a call and ask if they know where you can get large size timber.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    1,720

    Default

    Thor's Hammer here in Canberra.

    They have absolute mountains of the stuff. Thor's specialise in recycling old bridges and buildings.

    There is some right on the front page: Thor's Hammer

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    SEQ
    Posts
    107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    Thor's Hammer here in Canberra.
    Looks like a great business!
    Handy resource to have on your doorstep.

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    the sawdust factory, FNQ
    Posts
    983

    Default

    Look I do big timber for a couple guys. It's not cheap, and its special order.... we dont just cut stuff other then standard sizes for fun anymore, and I won't waste good logs turning them into stock that doesnt move.

    It's not going to be hard to get stuff slabbed out in thicker sections but it's the getting it dry. We air dry for a couple months at least before tossing them in the kiln, and 4" thick slabs can tie up a kiln for months. Someone has to pay for that. Just leg sections or shorter lengths - sure. I've got KD Northern Silky Oak and Queensland Maple in stock at 100 x 100 through to 100 x 250 most of the time. 125mm and thicker tends to disappear fast though, best to order that so I hold it for you.

    oak4.jpg Thats about current stock of 100 x 100 and 75x75 Northern Silky "shorts". Probably half as much again in maple in 100 x 100 and wider.



    Send me a PM to discuss your requirements and include an offsite email address if you dont mind, I dont get here often anymore so I try and keep it in our regular email system.

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    the sawdust factory, FNQ
    Posts
    983

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Luke Maddux View Post
    Try Watts Wood and Moulding on the south side. I went in there once and he had some 200x200 Queensland Maple. It is one of the largest pieces of dried, milled, defect free wood I've ever seen.

    In hindsight I should've bought it...

    Nonetheless, it's as good a shot as any.

    Otherwise, yeah, your experience is similar to most. Just not a lot of thick stuff being milled in Aus today.
    Wonder what idiot would be cutting stuff like 8 x 8 maple and salwood and stuff???
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    48
    Posts
    8,524

    Default

    Greg gave me a piece of Tas Blackwood (10cm X 25cm X 130cm).

    It's been sitting in my garage for years. It is beautiful. Trouble is it is too good to be cut into smaller pieces and too hard for to find a project suitable for it. I think I'll let it season for another 10 -15 years.
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    bilpin
    Posts
    2,345

    Default

    As John said, drying is the issue. I laminate for large sections. If you must use large sectional sizes it would be best to search out old, reclaimed timber.

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Nsw
    Age
    58
    Posts
    18

    Default

    I was picking up some logs from a local sawmill last week and talking with the owner. He was telling me that they are pretty much logged out on the far south coast of NSW.....all our beautiful timber is being chipped and sent to China out of Eden where it is bleached and made into board and composite flooring
    https://www.wilderness.org.au/articl...slands-forests

    it is a bloody disgrace and a waste of a valuable resource

    We just finished a project that had about 3 thousand l/m of wall cladding and over a kilometre of boardwalk all out of ironbark.
    The logs were sourced in QLD and sent to the south coast of NSW for milling for the job, pretty crazy it has come to that

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    bilpin
    Posts
    2,345

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beardy View Post
    I was picking up some logs from a local sawmill last week and talking with the owner. He was telling me that they are pretty much logged out on the far south coast of NSW.....all our beautiful timber is being chipped and sent to China out of Eden where it is bleached and made into board and composite flooring
    https://www.wilderness.org.au/articl...slands-forests

    it is a bloody disgrace and a waste of a valuable resource

    We just finished a project that had about 3 thousand l/m of wall cladding and over a kilometre of boardwalk all out of ironbark.
    The logs were sourced in QLD and sent to the south coast of NSW for milling for the job, pretty crazy it has come to that
    Why would you cart logs past every saw mill in NSW to the south coast? I would have thought milling local would be far more cost effective or was the southern mill desperate for work?

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Mornington Peninsula
    Posts
    2,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rustynail View Post
    Why would you cart logs past every saw mill in NSW to the south coast? I would have thought milling local would be far more cost effective or was the southern mill desperate for work?
    Many years ago, we were staying in Merimbula, and got talking to the owner of the place we were staying at.

    He recounted a story about when he was building and developing the property. It was a large area with quite a few timber cabins.

    He approached the local sawmill about supplying the timber. The upshot was that they were too expensive, would not negotiate and he ended up buying the timber in Melbourne and transporting it to Merimbula. He claimed that it was much cheaper.

    To say the local sawmill owner was upset, was an understatement. The prevailing thoughts of the owner, was that the sawmill owner thought that he had a monopoly and anyone would pay his price.

  12. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Nsw
    Age
    58
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rustynail View Post
    Why would you cart logs past every saw mill in NSW to the south coast? I would have thought milling local would be far more cost effective or was the southern mill desperate for work?
    The mill on the south coast won the tender to supply the timber, that is how they sourced their stock. I don’t know the details as to why they did it that way but they flew up and selected the trees and freighted them down. The timber quality was excellent

  13. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    the sawdust factory, FNQ
    Posts
    983

    Default

    The Chinese pay more money for the logs then an Australian mill can afford to - thats why the logs are being exported. As a logger... i get more PROFIT out of landing my logs on a wharf for export then I can out of putting them through my own sawmill for sale on the domestic market. I'm in business to make money: I'd have to see a 25% increase in the wholesale price of timber tomorrow to make the same kinda $ for less work.

    The chinese are happy to pay a premium for Australian hardwood because of its outstanding strength and appearance qualities while Australian buyers/builders are building to a low standard with cheap $h!t pine. When the last Australian hardwood mill shuts down in about 20 years time they'll ship gluelam back to us from their own eucalypt plantations... and no i am not joking and yes it is sad.

    I can cart good ironbark sawlog about 700km and not be out of pocket based on the premium we get for it here.

  14. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
    Age
    62
    Posts
    9,607

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beardy View Post
    I was picking up some logs from a local sawmill last week and talking with the owner. He was telling me that they are pretty much logged out on the far south coast of NSW.....all our beautiful timber is being chipped and sent to China out of Eden where it is bleached and made into board and composite flooring

    it is a bloody disgrace and a waste of a valuable resource
    we are just victims of our botanical fate.

    if you talk to oldies who were around prior to and shortly after WWII you'll hear stories about houses built with the seasoned Aus hardwood where every nail needed to be driven through a pre-drilled hole.
    Preference was to use imported Douglas Fir (Oregon), while we waited for our "import replacement" Radiata pine plantations to mature -- which they have now done.
    So although nail guns have largely solved the problem of nailing seasoned hardwood, we're using those same guns with crap pine because it the pine is plentiful and dirt cheap.
    regards from Canada

    ian

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 15th Nov 2012, 05:35 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10th Apr 2012, 08:42 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •