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  1. #1
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    Default Drill, Hammer, Rotary: Review - Ozito 900w

    Well, I've had my Ozito for a few weeks and done a series of jobs with it. I bought it at Bunnings for $69 and I must say I was reluctant to part with the dollars, as I have a "thing" about Ozito (Ozwinner will vouch for that!).

    My previous experience with the brand was an exploding 6" grinder - nope, I am not kidding - so it was very hard to stretch the trust again. This tool has been used to help with a renovation; removing tiles, drilling dynabolt holes and removing tile cement etc, plus some holes in brick.

    Standard Drill Function

    I have not used it for the standard drill function as I have a bunch of other lighter drills for that. However, the company provides a chuck on an SDS shaft that is easy to plug in. I look forward to the next time I have a job for the 3" hole saw .

    Rotary Hammer Function

    Now, I have not used a rotary hammer before so I can't compare to other brands. What I can compare to is the previous generation of concrete drills (the hammer drills). This is the common electric drill with a hammer function. When you finish drilling a hole with them you typically have had your dentures float free of your gums and lost your hearing for 20-30 mins.

    Using a hammer drill (I have probably used 20-30 different brand/models of hammer drills over the years) it usually takes about a minute of teeth gritting, ear deafening effort to get a hole in brick or concrete using an 8-10mm bit.

    The Ozito unit took about 4 minutes to drill eight 8mm x 90mm holes; including moving from hole to hole and setting up accurately, taking my time. The heavier mass of the rotary drill helped to keep it in place when starting the hole and, although noisy, was quieter in operation than drills used previously. One thing in particular I like about the rotary hammer, and perhaps standard to SDS drill bits, was the floating feeling the drill has when cutting. It did not shake the eyes out of their sockets like some I've used, in fact, there was very little feedback at all really.

    Hammer (percussion) Function

    I removed a bunch of tiles using just the hammer function. At first it took a little bit of getting used to because the spade bit kept turning and the grip kept rolling around the drill. Eventually I woke up to the fact the twist grip actually locked the handle, and not the depth rod like on my old Pentagon-Kress hammer drill; so that issue went away. The spade bit did turn slowly but I found that to be an advantage once I got used to it. By not locking in place, I found I could get the drill at different angles when near walls etc. It is a bit like getting used to using a heavy floor polisher or sander (I'm sure more than a few guys here have been taken for a round-walk by one of those).

    Where's the grease, and what's it for?

    First, the grease is not for the bits or the rubber cap. It is for the eccentric cam under the dust housing, refer to pic one. I have included a series of photos with some tips:

    Replace around 50 hours of use.

    Step 1 - Turn the top lever to hammer/drill (dressed to the left as you look from the handle, or pointing right as viewed from the chuck, see picture two. Also loosen the two upper handle retaining screws to make it easier to free the top housing, see picture three.

    Step 2 - Remove the six machine screws holding the dust housing, being careful not to lose either the washer or spring washer fitted to each.

    Step 3 - Carefully remove the housing and lift it clear, making sure the dust seal does not stick to the main body and break, see pic four (noting the thin black line of the dust seal between the red lead and the wooden taper of the pencil). You can avoid this risk by lifting only a mm or two and running a pencil around the joints to ensure there are no snags.

    Step 4 - remove old grease and grit, then repack using the contents of the 50cc supplied container.

    Step 5 - Wipe the seal clean on the housing and give it a light smear of the (clean) sticky stuff. Reseat the top housing being very careful that the lever mechanism engages correctly back in its hole (see pic five), otherwise it will sit off-center of the hole and BE CRUSHED when you tighten the screws. Watch the lever when tightening the screws and ensure a gap doesn't appear at the base. If a gap appears that means you have not seated the top correctly and the lever will be very hard to move. Also ensure during this process that the seal does not drop free and get crushed as the screws are tightened. Tighten the screws from the lever end first, working your way back until all six are seated - do not overtighten.

    Step 6 - Hang on, did you tighten the two screws you loosened on the handle? Better do them too. Check the lever can move freely and that the housing is seated evenly. If at any point you had to force things, there is likely to be something wrong.

    Step 7 - plug in and test.

    Summary
    A good tool for the price and value for money. It won't last forever yet is showing no signs of collapse yet. It does all it is supposed to do and has a good warranty to boot. It gets a (reluctant) thumbs-up from me

    (This as the literary equivalent of eating my hat - happy now Al? )
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Groggy; 15th Sep 2007 at 09:14 AM.

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  3. #2
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    Default

    A couple more pics of the lever and hole it must seat in.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Default

    Top summary Groggy. I've had mine for 3 months now and it has been very useful. I've used the drill a reasonable amount outside and like the firm hold you can get especially when using large bits . Compared to the other Ozitos I've used, it stands out like dogs testicles both in performance and usability, although I am increasingly impressed with their small angle grinder which I continue to throw everything at including a 70kg limestone block, and it seems to be going like a bomb.

  5. #4
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    Hi all

    I have one, used it for the first time to remove wall tiles in a kitchen.
    Excellant!!

    Just 1 thing, as I am 5ft nil, I had to brace it on my shoulder to reach the higher tiles especially as my arms got tired ( it has a bit of weight) , my shoulder and arms were sore for a few days - but worth it. about 4-5 hours works reduced to less than 1.

    Celeste

  6. #5
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    I had uninvited guests in the form of termites (found them on Xmas day -- thanks santa) so I had to drill 500+ by 14ml holes through 100ml concrete slab so after reading about these drills on the forum I bought one and put all the holes down in 4hrs wore out one bit and the drill never missed a beat.
    They have one me with this tool. Know nothing about the rest.

    Arch

  7. #6
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    Well what a top summary Groggy

    I got one about a month ago hasn`t missed a beat. And all for $69 great value !
    Thinking about mowing the lawn doesn`t get it done !

  8. #7
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    Talking

    Good one Groggy but what is the grease for?
    Cliff.
    ...if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail...

  9. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff Rogers View Post
    Good one Groggy but what is the grease for?
    You know . . . like Capn Kirk calls on communicator, "grease me Scotty" . . . No that was beam not grease wasn't it.
    Last edited by scooter; 3rd Feb 2007 at 01:59 PM. Reason: tidy up

  10. #9
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    BobL -

    You say your Ozito angle grinder is 'going like a bomb'.

    I take it you are not referring to the kind of experience Groggy had with his Ozito grinder ...

    GW
    Where you see a tree, I see 3 cubic metres of timber, milled and dressed.

  11. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff Rogers View Post
    Good one Groggy but what is the grease for?
    "...It is for the eccentric cam under the dust housing, refer to pic one. I have included a series of photos with some tips:"

  12. #11
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    I thought I had better jump on the bandwagon. Paid $99 for one at the local bunnings.

    Went to the other local bunnings and there they were for $69. Hmm, I thought, I've been done over (again). I was about to buy the $69 dollar one to return (unopened) to the other Bunnies() but checked to see if they were the same. Low and behold, the $69 dollar one is 3.0 joule, 900A, whereas the $99 one is 3.5Joule, 1100A. To be honest, I don't know if it makes much difference, but it may have been embarrasing if I had got caught out.
    In the end, I've kept the original.(didn't buy the cheaper.)
    Cheers
    TM
    Last edited by TermiMonster; 3rd Feb 2007 at 02:49 PM. Reason: spelling!

  13. #12
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    Correction: read 900 W vs 1100W
    Cheers
    TM
    Last edited by TermiMonster; 3rd Feb 2007 at 02:58 PM. Reason: Can't get anything right.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TermiMonster View Post
    900A,
    Cheers
    TM
    Sheet, I hope you wear the asbestos fire suit when you use it?

    Al

  15. #14
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    Funny how sometimes the cheap stuff can amaze us. I have an NRG drill I've had for years, its done some good work, including brick which althought it smoked like a Marlboro marketing executive, its still hanging in there.

  16. #15
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    While there is a skerick of grease leaking from the housing, as they do, I couldnt be bothered to dismantle the thing to grease it.

    Sounds as though you are in love with it Groggy?

    Al

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