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Thread: Chain saw Angle

  1. #1
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    Default Chain saw Angle

    Another question for our experts.

    What is the correct angle a chain should be sharpened at for a 3/8 " chain.

    Is there a recommended angle for various types of hardness in the wood to be cut or is there a one angle suits all. Does the power and length of blade have an influence and would you personally use different angles for different reasons.

    So far you have helped me a lot and my chain sawing maintenance and sharpening has improved out of sight, but does the angle matter or is it the sharpness the reason i am getting a better cut.?

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    Default

    This is a "how long is a piece of string question".

    There are several critical angles (top plate, and side plate) as shown by this image. These are obtained by using two filing angles (vertical and horizontal angles of holding the file)


    For ripping chain these are common settings:
    Hold the file at 10 on the horizontal and 10 on the vertical.



    In general follow the manufacturers recommendation and then experiment by small increments from there.

    If you go to the oregon chainsaw website you can download a 75? page manual on chain specs and tips and tricks.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    BobL, I should have known better, I thought my question was stupid and easily dismissed.

    Looks like I will have to contact Open Learning and apply for a part time University Degree.

    Are their no simple answers any more ?.

    I will follow through on that site and thanks for the reply, I do not feel such a dill now that i see what at first appeared simple has a fair bit of technology behind it. Thanks again for you reply.

  5. #4
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    most info you need is above.

    teh 10* down angle is nolonger recomended as it has been discoverd that when you push witht eh file it tilts the tooth away creating this angle.

    that may be the instructions for filing ripping chain as the top plate angle on regular chain is usualy 25* not 10-15* as stated.

    the angles dont make a huge diferance for general docking but if making big cuts with a small saw you will start to notice it.

    Hardwood Sawmillers - Gatton,qld - 0417982589

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    For general cross-cutting work such as docking limbs or logs to shorter lengths keep the top plate angle at 30 as marked on the top of the teeth and for slabbing work 10-15

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    thats right each tooth should have a line scored accross it. kep the angl the same as this line

    Hardwood Sawmillers - Gatton,qld - 0417982589

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    I will let this info sink in for a few days, but I am thinking that with the information supplied so far, the angle for Docking and Ripping vary considerably, just as the teeth in a cross cut saw varies from a ripping blade.

    Am I on the right thinking curve.?

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    For 28 years I have been using a Top Plate angle of 30 degrees. Just last year I bought a new chain and at the time I didn't notice the Top Plate angle on it until I went to sharpen it and from new it was 20 degrees.

    The difference in the way it cut 20 year old dry yellow box for firewood as well as holding its edge was amazing. My brother in law who has been cutting wood for 50 years couldn't believe the difference either.

    I always use Oregon chains so it wasn't like a change of brands that made the difference.

    I still haven't asked my chainsaw dealer why it was sharpened that way straight off the shelf but from now on that is the way I will be using the chain with a 20 degree Top Plate angle.

    Quote Originally Posted by weisyboy View Post
    teh 10* down angle is nolonger recomended as it has been discoverd that when you push witht eh file it tilts the tooth away creating this angle.
    Carl if you use an Oregon filing jig this doesn't happen because the jig clamps the chain and holds it rigid.
    Regards Bazza

    Skype Username: bazzabushy

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    The views expressed by the poster are general in nature and any advice should be taken in this vein. The poster accepts no responsibility if this advice is used. When undertaking any work personal professional advice should be sought from suitably qualified persons in the field of work being undertaken.


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    but if you use the jig all the angles will be pre set.

    i always file free hand anyhow.

    Hardwood Sawmillers - Gatton,qld - 0417982589

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    Hey Star, whats the likelihood of you coming out to Weisy's sawdust BBQ, would be a really good oportunity for you to see some of this stuff first hand?

    I know when I sharpen, I don't get too picky with it, I try and keep things even on both sides, but as for getting all the angles like shown above - I'm not that picky. Also I don't slab like BOB and Carl with a chainsaw, so again it'd be good if you can get to the sawdust BBQ?
    I love my Lucas!!

    ...just ask me!

    Allan.



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    Sigidi, Like you I am always willing to learn.

    Just say when, and I will try to schedule that free week end. I think you were thinking of camping there overnight, if so, I will try to bring my horse float up which has been set up for camping when I used to play Polo Crosse and do Campdrafting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by weisyboy View Post
    but if you use the jig all the angles will be pre set.

    i always file free hand anyhow.
    Carl

    You obviously have never seen an Oregon Chainsaw Sharpening Jig. All angles are adjustable to suit whatever chain you are sharpening.

    Have a look here. The trouble is you have to fork out the readdies to own one.

    Have a look here.

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/showpo...76&postcount=4

    or one of these.

    http://www.right-tool.com/orchainsawsh.html Courtesy of a DavidG post.
    Regards Bazza

    Skype Username: bazzabushy

    "Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards."
    -Vernon Sanders Law

    The views expressed by the poster are general in nature and any advice should be taken in this vein. The poster accepts no responsibility if this advice is used. When undertaking any work personal professional advice should be sought from suitably qualified persons in the field of work being undertaken.


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    iv got one of the latter but onyl use it if the tooth is chiped or badly rounded i find a file leaves a mutch better finish.

    Hardwood Sawmillers - Gatton,qld - 0417982589

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    Bazza,

    I've been sharpening my ripping blade freehand because of the frequency that it has to be done when slabbing. Do you find that jig takes a long time? How fiddly is it to move to the next tooth?

    I've found I get a good result by doing it the way weisyboy suggests. If you hold the file at 90 degrees and push it against the tooth, it lifts up enough to give you about 10 degrees. Then you only have to worry about the top plate angle.

    But if the jig is quick, it would be good because my old man uses the saws too and he uses one of those 12v electric sharpeners. If I could get him onto hand filing the chain might last longer. What do you think?
    "I don't practice what I preach because I'm not the kind of person I'm preaching to."

  16. #15
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    Darren

    It takes me about 10 minutes to sharpen a chain. To move the next tooth up you just loosen a thumb screw that tightens a clamp that holds the chain rigid, slide the next tooth up to the stop and re tighten the thumb screw. Two to three strokes of the file is usually enough to sharpen the tooth.

    I clamp the bar in an engineers vice to sharpen the chain.

    The best part about it is that all the angles are consistent. After about 7 to 10 sharpens on the hand jig I touch the chain up on the electric one. It is better to get all the teeth a constant length.
    Regards Bazza

    Skype Username: bazzabushy

    "Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards."
    -Vernon Sanders Law

    The views expressed by the poster are general in nature and any advice should be taken in this vein. The poster accepts no responsibility if this advice is used. When undertaking any work personal professional advice should be sought from suitably qualified persons in the field of work being undertaken.


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