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    Default Husky 3120 and Stihl 880 ,positives & negatives.

    hey boys, looking at buying a Husky 3120 or Stihl 880 in December (purchasing in OZ) which i'll be using for CS milling ... If anyone owning or using/used either of these saws can give there opinions / professional feedback, that would be very much appreciated and noted ..."The positives & negatives of both saws" cheers

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  3. #2
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    Both are good saws. Have used stihls for the majority of my 40+ years in the game with no regrets. From time to time I have used huskys without problems.Personally I prefer the stihl but I think this is only because I have become so used to it. I have never used a CS as a mill saw so my comments are limited to felling etc. To help overcome the blocking of the air cleaner we use a piece of stocking,

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    I have a 3120 used for slabbing, havent used a 880 so can't really compare, the Husky does everything I want it to, bout the only hassle I've had with it is that when hot and go to restart can be reluctant to start, some sort of fuel vapour lock thing going on, doesn't happen all the time just sometimes

    Pete

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    Quote Originally Posted by widowmaker View Post
    hey boys, looking at buying a Husky 3120 or Stihl 880 in December (purchasing in OZ) which i'll be using for CS milling ... If anyone owning or using/used either of these saws can give there opinions / professional feedback, that would be very much appreciated and noted ..."The positives & negatives of both saws" cheers
    I have used both saws.

    3120
    - is rev limited to about 10k and has a fixed H jet. This means the H Jet cannot be adjusted without replacing the jet so if you want to do any muffler mods it has a limited tuning span and teh ject would need to be replaced if you move outside it's range.
    - it has an outboard clutch which means changing sprockets is a bit of a PITA.
    - It has front end chain tensioning which means the saw has to be removed from the mill to tension the chain unless a mod is made to the mill.
    - it has up to 54 ml/min bar oil delivering although most of the excess oil is flung off the nose

    880
    - is rev limited to 12K and has a variable H jet.
    - has an inboard clutch
    - has side on chain tensioning
    - only has 36 ml/min bar oil delivery.

    The 3120 is supposed to have better filtration but I didn't experience that when I used it even though I was cutting dry logs.
    Both are strong saws but don't cut much faster in small wood unless the rakers are seriously dropped. They really shine in wide cuts where other saws just stop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustynail View Post
    Both are good saws. Have used stihls for the majority of my 40+ years in the game with no regrets. From time to time I have used huskys without problems.Personally I prefer the stihl but I think this is only because I have become so used to it. I have never used a CS as a mill saw so my comments are limited to felling etc. To help overcome the blocking of the air cleaner we use a piece of stocking,
    hey mate . the stocking sounds good enough in a non milling situation, being a much finer woven material should help stop the finer dust/chips getting threw to main/pre filter ..think a slightly oily sock between the main filter and stocking might be the go when milling dry hardwood? the stocking should keep most of the fines from getting threw and clogging the oily sock, the bigger chips should fall away ...the oily sock will catch any finer dust getting threw before it reaches the main filters

    Quote Originally Posted by pjt View Post
    I have a 3120 used for slabbing, havent used a 880 so can't really compare, the Husky does everything I want it to, bout the only hassle I've had with it is that when hot and go to restart can be reluctant to start, some sort of fuel vapour lock thing going on, doesn't happen all the time just sometimes

    Pete
    hey .Ive herd of this ,my guess its just an aussie summer problem ive had it happen to a stihl 076 ,It seems to be a heat transfer thing, from the cylinder threw the inlet into the carby ,which makes the fuel evaporate ...Richening the H /opening up the muffler can help dissipate heat

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I have used both saws.

    3120
    - is rev limited to about 10k and has a fixed H jet. This means the H Jet cannot be adjusted without replacing the jet so if you want to do any muffler mods it has a limited tuning span and teh ject would need to be replaced if you move outside it's range.
    - it has an outboard clutch which means changing sprockets is a bit of a PITA.
    - It has front end chain tensioning which means the saw has to be removed from the mill to tension the chain unless a mod is made to the mill.
    - it has up to 54 ml/min bar oil delivering although most of the excess oil is flung off the nose

    880
    - is rev limited to 12K and has a variable H jet.
    - has an inboard clutch
    - has side on chain tensioning
    - only has 36 ml/min bar oil delivery.

    The 3120 is supposed to have better filtration but I didn't experience that when I used it even though I was cutting dry logs.
    Both are strong saws but don't cut much faster in small wood unless the rakers are seriously dropped. They really shine in wide cuts where other saws just stop.
    hey bob outboard clutches can be a little more time consuming for sprocket changes but they do seem to run a lot cooler, especially if you run the saw without the clutch cover for milling to stop the noddles/chips from building up, gets a lot more air flow with the outboard and less crank heat transfer ! but all and all ..all good points you've hit on there bud ...positives & negatives for both!! thanks !! Im guessing the Oil flow on the husky could be a better choice (got a manual oiler too i believe) your saying the excess only gets flung of the tip on the 3120? Im guessing the 880 would be flinging oil too... which would mean the 880 gets even less oil on the underside of the bar ? I do like the 880 for the tuning of the H !! running rich in a milling situation is a must ,also meaning there can be a muffler mod to dissipate more internal heat .and the rev limits don't really come into play in a milling situation.. under load they shouldnt be hitting there limits .if its gonna be a race saw there is always mods available for both saws ..cheers mate

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    Quote Originally Posted by widowmaker View Post
    hey bob outboard clutches can be a little more time consuming for sprocket changes but they do seem to run a lot cooler, especially if you run the saw without the clutch cover for milling to stop the noddles/chips from building up, gets a lot more air flow with the outboard and less crank heat transfer !
    That may be correct for chain saws in conventional use but you have to remember that on a milling saw, the clutch once engaged it rarely is disengaged until the cut is finished. This means the clutch does bugger all work and then doesn't heat up.

    Im guessing the Oil flow on the husky could be a better choice (got a manual oiler too i believe) your saying the excess only gets flung of the tip on the 3120? Im guessing the 880 would be flinging oil too... which would mean the 880 gets even less oil on the underside of the bar ?
    The manual oiler on the husky is a PITA to use. If the oil on the husky is maxed out (54 ml/min) I see great gobbys of oil dripping off at the nose. On the 880 at 36 ml/min I only see a smaller amount of excess at the nose. My preference is to take that extra 18 ml/min and deliver it after the nose via an aux oiler so that I know it is actually getting onto the section of the bar that is doing the cutting. I can also use much less expensive canola oil in the aux oiler.

    I do like the 880 for the tuning of the H !! running rich in a milling situation is a must ,also meaning there can be a muffler mod to dissipate more internal heat .and the rev limits don't really come into play in a milling situation.. under load they shouldnt be hitting there limits .if its gonna be a race saw there is always mods available for both saws ..cheers mate
    Correct, rev limits shouldn't be a worry during normal milling. Both saws sit around 8000 rpm when cutting bigger stuff, but if you happen upon a smaller log it could be as high at 10,000. It was OK on the 880 but it irritated me on the 3120. If one was cutting a lot of small stuff then one could drop the rakers so it loaded up the saw more to drop the cutting revs but then that means running chains with different rakers settings for different sized logs.

    Both saws are great fun to use and very reliable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    That may be correct for chain saws in conventional use but you have to remember that on a milling saw, the clutch once engaged it rarely is disengaged until the cut is finished. This means the clutch does bugger all work and then doesn't heat up.


    The manual oiler on the husky is a PITA to use. If the oil on the husky is maxed out (54 ml/min) I see great gobbys of oil dripping off at the nose. On the 880 at 36 ml/min I only see a smaller amount of excess at the nose. My preference is to take that extra 18 ml/min and deliver it after the nose via an aux oiler so that I know it is actually getting onto the section of the bar that is doing the cutting. I can also use much less expensive canola oil in the aux oiler.



    Correct, rev limits shouldn't be a worry during normal milling. Both saws sit around 8000 rpm when cutting bigger stuff, but if you happen upon a smaller log it could be as high at 10,000. It was OK on the 880 but it irritated me on the 3120. If one was cutting a lot of small stuff then one could drop the rakers so it loaded up the saw more to drop the cutting revs but then that means running chains with different rakers settings for different sized logs.

    Both saws are great fun to use and very reliable.
    hey bob seems your right in most sense ,with the outboard clutch. but i would say the outboard clutch runs cooler in general in all situations being it sits well away from the crankcase out in open air! less heat transfer regardless of engaging once or multiply ... seems to me the more oil the better in all conditions, if big blobs are dripping of the tip, then there seems to me more oil for the chain to ride threw, proving more oil all around .. there can never be enough oil in my opinion ...the manual oiler might be PITA but it gets more oil to the bar (the manual oiler I miss on newer saws !!) the 090 ,076 etc flings a heap of oil from the tip ...making the chain always well lubed ! I think I want both saws now bob haha ...and picking up a 090av in Dec

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    Your suggestion about the oily sock could be ok. The good thing with the stocking is that its slippery and dry. Therefore it sheds dust well. I think the oily sock would tend to foul the stocking with oil and defeat its purpose. I find one layer of good quality fine mesh stocking makes a hell of a difference. I cut a lot of dry ironbark, greygum, greybox and turpentine. The ironbark puts up a fine dust, particularly with a dulling blade. I can understand that prolonged milling could create a lot of fine dust, but I'd be surprised if fine stocking didn't help and you could always fold it back to form two layers/

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustynail View Post
    Your suggestion about the oily sock could be ok. The good thing with the stocking is that its slippery and dry. Therefore it sheds dust well. I think the oily sock would tend to foul the stocking with oil and defeat its purpose. I find one layer of good quality fine mesh stocking makes a hell of a difference. I cut a lot of dry ironbark, greygum, greybox and turpentine. The ironbark puts up a fine dust, particularly with a dulling blade. I can understand that prolonged milling could create a lot of fine dust, but I'd be surprised if fine stocking didn't help and you could always fold it back to form two layers/
    yeah your right ,if the outer layer stocking didn't soak up the oil from the sock and it "stayed dry" the oily sock second defense layer could work out okay ...but the outside layer, being the stocking it has to stay oil free (dry) to work, so it doesn't act like a dust absorbing magnet .... at the moment Im just using a sock over the filter and a stocking over that, was just looking into being able to oil the second outer layer (the sock) so nothing gets threw to the actual filter itself ...cheers rusty

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    Quote Originally Posted by widowmaker View Post
    hey bob seems your right in most sense ,with the outboard clutch. but i would say the outboard clutch runs cooler in general in all situations being it sits well away from the crankcase out in open air! less heat transfer regardless of engaging once or multiply
    There is no comparison between the two situations. The temp getting from a crankcase to the clutch will be in the region of 200 whereas that generated at the clutch surface by an active clutch will be in the high hundreds maybe a thousand. The alloy steel components in a clutch can sit at 200 for months on end and it won't alter their performance or wear. I have use both inboard and outboard cltches and have not noticed any difference in wear and tear between them.

    ... seems to me the more oil the better in all conditions, if big blobs are dripping of the tip, then there seems to me more oil for the chain to ride threw, proving more oil all around .. there can never be enough oil in my opinion ..
    If can afford your hard earned $$ dripping off the end of the bar then go for it. I prefer the oil actually getting to the business side of the operation. With an aux oiler one can also easily control the flow of oil during the cut without messing about with screwdrivers under a saw. Have a look in this thread as to how I did this.

    .the manual oiler might be PITA but it gets more oil to the bar (the manual oiler I miss on newer saws !!) the 090 ,076 etc flings a heap of oil from the tip ...making the chain always well lubed
    Oil to the bar means very little if it comes off at the nose before it gets to the cutting side of the bar.
    The reason why older saws (like the 076) needed a manual oiler is because of the miserable (19 ml/min for the 076) delivery rate that these saw output, but actually using a manual oiler for 20 minutes while cutting a big slab has knobs on it. The other thing about using the manual oiler is it requires the operators hand to be in a very awkward spot on the wrap handle while milling. This is why I gave up using it on my 076. A remote throttle to get the CS miller standing upright while milling is miles more comfortable. It is much easier to forget the manual oiler and saws with too lo-hi oil delivery rates and run an aux oiler so the oil gets to where its needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    There is no comparison between the two situations. The temp getting from a crankcase to the clutch will be in the region of 200 whereas that generated at the clutch surface by an active clutch will be in the high hundreds maybe a thousand. The alloy steel components in a clutch can sit at 200 for months on end and it won't alter their performance or wear. I have use both inboard and outboard cltches and have not noticed any difference in wear and tear between them.


    If can afford your hard earned $$ dripping off the end of the bar then go for it. I prefer the oil actually getting to the business side of the operation. With an aux oiler one can also easily control the flow of oil during the cut without messing about with screwdrivers under a saw. Have a look in this thread as to how I did this.


    Oil to the bar means very little if it comes off at the nose before it gets to the cutting side of the bar.
    The reason why older saws (like the 076) needed a manual oiler is because of the miserable (19 ml/min for the 076) delivery rate that these saw output, but actually using a manual oiler for 20 minutes while cutting a big slab has knobs on it. The other thing about using the manual oiler is it requires the operators hand to be in a very awkward spot on the wrap handle while milling. This is why I gave up using it on my 076. A remote throttle to get the CS miller standing upright while milling is miles more comfortable. It is much easier to forget the manual oiler and saws with too lo-hi oil delivery rates and run an aux oiler so the oil gets to where its needed.

    inboard and outboard clutches they both have positives and negatives bob, I wasn't saying there is something wrong with inboard ,just the same as there is nothing wrong with outboard ( I have used used them both ) ... wasting a little flung oil that's not a concern to me ,the more oil coming out the oiler the better in my opinion! means there's more getting carried around logically. I like your set up bob!!! I would be using a Aux oiler just after the tip anyway, but I still believe the more oil the saw is pumping out, that has to be a positive. ...cheers mate! ...just got a price for a new 880 from the local stihl dealer $2500. he was also saying there is a New 881 just around the corner, probably got a lot of emission crap on it

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    Quote Originally Posted by widowmaker View Post
    ... wasting a little flung oil that's not a concern to me ,the more oil coming out the oiler the better in my opinion! means there's more getting carried around logically.
    Unfortunately it doesn't work like that - the gap between the bar and chain and the chain itself can only hold so much oil. After that the excess gets flung off at the bar nose. I have done several experiments that demonstrate this by weighing a bucket and then running a saw in a mill and covering the bar nose with the bucket. After running the saw for two minutes I weigh the bucket to measure how much oil it has captured. It turns out that increasing the oil flow output at the saw just puts up with all the extra oil into the bucket, which in turn means nothing extra is staying on the chain.


    I like your set up bob!!!
    I have several other setups you may wish to check out.

    This was my first mill:

    I still have this and now use it with a 441 and a 25" bar on small logs.
    For more details check out POst#66 in this thread
    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f132/m...25/index5.html

    Here is a milling setup for tackling short logs that uses the small CSM above;

    details see: http://www.woodworkforums.com/f44/ch...rt-logs-46980/

    This is my mini/beam-mill:

    I use this with a 441 to break up big slabs.
    Details sareee; http://www.woodworkforums.com/f132/f...ni-mill-93821/

    This is my latest:

    Details are at http://www.woodworkforums.com/f132/b...s-mill-126320/
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I have several other setups you may wish to check out.

    This was my first mill:

    I still have this and now use it with a 441 and a 25" bar on small logs.
    For more details check out POst#66 in this thread
    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f132/m...25/index5.html

    Here is a milling setup for tackling short logs that uses the small CSM above;

    details see: http://www.woodworkforums.com/f44/ch...rt-logs-46980/

    This is my mini/beam-mill:

    I use this with a 441 to break up big slabs.
    Details sareee; http://www.woodworkforums.com/f132/f...ni-mill-93821/

    This is my latest:

    Details are at http://www.woodworkforums.com/f132/b...s-mill-126320/
    they look good bud ,love the custom pipe work on de 880 !! howz the 880 comparing to the ballsy 076, power/torque wise ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by widowmaker View Post
    they look good bud ,love the custom pipe work on de 880 !! howz the 880 comparing to the ballsy 076, power/torque wise ??
    That pipe not only looks good it works really well in practice because it blasts the sawdust away from the operator. When I use the 880 I never have to wade through ankle deep sawdust near the end of milling a log.

    Under normal operating conditions the 880 is a higher revving saw so when correctly handled and set up it out-cuts the 076 all the way through the log size range. I can make the 076 cut as fast as the 880 on smaller logs by dropping the rakers but then it would struggle on bigger wood with the same chain. The 076 is very reliable though and has not missed a beat. When the 880 is flooded it is a pig to clear where as the 076 is up and running in no time.

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    gday

    i have cooked (melted) the cylinder on my 3120 and 2 x 575XP husky saws splitting posts, never cooked a stihl.

    i feel they just rev to high to the extended constant use.

    i will never buy a husky again.

    Hardwood Sawmillers - Gatton,qld - 0417982589

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