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  1. #1
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    Default Hingejoint Fencing

    What is the correct way to run out hinge joint fencing. Can it be done without the multiple wire strainers. Or where can I get the information.

    I have put a round pipe through all the different strands and used a single strand wire strainer. I have also used the pipe and with a snatch strap at each end attached it to my Patrol.

    Neither really gives a real tight fence but is much better then just tacking it to a top and bottom strained wire. I am getting a reasonable job, but still seem to get that flop in a few sections.

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  3. #2
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    Hinge joint is usually run with three wires. Top, middle and bottom.

    The wires are strained up first then the hinge joint run.
    Connect the hinge joint at one end then strain from the other.

    Use clips to fasten the hinge joint to the strained wires.
    You will notice crimps in the hinge joint horizontal wires. These are to provide flexibility in the wire so it doesn't break when hit by an animal.

    Do a google on Waratah hinge joint.
    For the best results I use -

  4. #3
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    ... but it depends on who manufactured the wire. Some prefab fencing (like Waratah's Stocktite) includes integral HT top and bottom wires and don't need additional support wires.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  5. #4
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    Default Use selvedge wires!

    My 2c worth on this one - is to recommend you use selvedge wires, as suggested by David. I usually use 2.5 or 2.85 HT fencing wire. And then staple the hinge/ring lock to the selvedge wires.

    There's a few reasons for this. First, it's what all the books and professionals tell you to do. Second, it makes it infinitely easier to re-use the hingelock (which is stupidly expensive stuff, compare and contrast fencing wire) elsewhere later on. Third, it means you don't have to strain the crikey out of the hinge/ring-lock (as pointed out by David also, this stuff comes with small bends, every 10cm or so) and damage it in the process. Fourth it's much easier (well, I find it much easier).

    To strain the hingelock, I made up a strainer of my own - ripped a short length of timber after drilling some very small holes in the right places (say 1.5mm dia). I then put some wing-nut bolts through same. It's a pain to lock into place compared to the brand-name strainers, but it's about $150 cheaper so I manage to live with it. A smarter person than me could easily come up with a better rig, I'm sure.

  6. #5
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    all i do to strain that stuff is . i have 2 bits of 1x1 shs with 3 bolts through and i clamp the ring lock or hinge joint between them and strain with my normal fence strainers works for me

  7. #6
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    Calm is offline Stubby Owner and proud of it. Now coming back to Earth.:D
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    Quote Originally Posted by texx View Post
    all i do to strain that stuff is . i have 2 bits of 1x1 shs with 3 bolts through and i clamp the ring lock or hinge joint between them and strain with my normal fence strainers works for me
    It is better with a top & bottom wire , to strain i use this method or you could get away with a board each side nailed together. Attach a chain to the ute pull the wire against the strainer post (not all the way round) staple each wire to the strainer to hold until tied, then unhook the boards and tie off around the strainer.

    Hope that helps.

    Cheers
    regards

    David


    "Tell him he's dreamin."
    "How's the serenity" (from "The Castle")

  8. #7
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    Hi Guys

    One method I use is, On a roll of ringlock or hingejoint fencing, there can be a GRIPPLE on the wires at one end of the roll, these are for joining the next roll on...
    Cut the first row of wires off the end and remove the Gripples.

    Join the ringlock on one end of your run, then the other end of the run 'loose'. You now have a loose fence.

    Go to about the half point, cut through the fence one wire at a time, each time rejoining with the Gripple. Now you can tension up the fence (your ag shop may have a GRIPPLER you can borrow for a day. If not just use your wire strainers, cut out and remove the vertical wires and rings as they approach the wire strainers.

    Oh and one more thing, when you take out the vertical wires when straining, straighten out the little kinks left where the hinge joins the wires, it'll make going through the Gripple easier. Gripples are worth $2-$3 each, you can buy the Gripplers but probably not worth it unless you've got heaps to do. (I borrow my Dads).
    It sound complicated when typing it out, but its easier as pie. Join both ends, Cut, Rejoin and Tension Up.

    A GRIPPLER makes this job easier, but I've done it many times without one.

    And if after a while the fence loses a bit tension just put the strainers on a nip up the fence through the Gripples. One word of advice, AFTER you've tensioned the fence up and are happy with it, just give the Gripple and little squirt with CRC, and if your ever 'walking the boundary' take the CRC and give just a little squirt, ever year or so. This will make it easier to tension up the fence if you need to if the fence stretches out a bit or gets stretched from people climbing the fence for example or a mad bull, or stupid sheep.

    Regards Matt

    P.S Gripples are worth about $2-$3 each depending on Wire size. You can buy Gripplers but probably not worth it unless your doing heaps. And straighten the little kinks left behind when cutting out the vertical wires while straining, it allows the wire to go through the Gripple smoothly.

  9. #8
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    catbuilder, this will not help you with straining, and I hope you will forgive unrequested opinion, but we found years ago that hinge-joint was not suitable for horses as some paw the fence and trap the hoof, resulting in nasty greasy heel, at least.

    You may not be running horses in those paddocks.

  10. #9
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    [QUOTE=jedd;844201 it makes it infinitely easier to re-use the hingelock (which is stupidly expensive stuff, compare and contrast fencing wire) elsewhere later on. [/QUOTE]

    Hingelock is expensive and do you notice it is very often the first component in a fence to rust out, especially the bottom strand where it comes in contact with the ground. I have lately been using a run of double coated barbed wire through the bottom hole in the pickets and then the first selvedge plain wire in the next hole up. This is actually a better fence for keeping goats as the goats have an aversion to going over the run of barbed, even though there is an inviting gap between the barb and the bottom selvedge and ringlock. I suppose the bottom barbed will eventually be the first thing to rust, but when it does, replacing a single run of barbed will be easier and cheaper than doing the ringlock again. You don't need a lot of tension on the ringlock either, put your tension on the 2 or 3 selvedge wires and you can string the ringlock fairly loose.

  11. #10
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    Sorry, You've lost me there Old Farmer, I have done many fences with ringlock using this method and its still working years on.

    I didn't read anything about horses, so if I missed that I apologise.

    I wouldn't hestitate using this method, because it works. I can get a fence tighter than a clamp and a ute, not that I think theres anything wrong with the method either.

    Regards Matt

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