Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Worm farm

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toowoomba Qld.
    Age
    55
    Posts
    2,796
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    17

    Default Worm farm

    Hi again,
    I mentioned my worm farm a while back, so thought I'd post a couple of pics. Its in an old bathtub, placed on a stand so there is room underneath for a bucket, and there is a slight slope for water to drain away into it.
    The whole thing is well shaded, behind a slat fence on the east and under a locquat tree to the west, with a shed to the south protecting it from wind and full rain. I also have piece of shade cloth draped over it.
    I put a mix of horse manure, clippings and leaves etc along with all the kitchen waste that doesn't go to the chooks...including citrus, coffee grinds, onion skins and oil! They handle it all, but come up asking for more when its manure on offer. They'll move into it within a day!
    The compost is moved progressively towards the left, (drain end), and I seperate garden-ready castings over the drain by a row of bricks...always intended to make a wooden baffle, but this works ok.
    I decant the "worm tea" that comes out the drain into plastic bottles and store in the shed, ready for fertilizing. Dilute it down, even 20-1, with water before applying to pot plants, citrus trees, vegies etc. I place handfuls of castings into every hole/furrow I dig for planting, and that includes vegie seeds, native seedlings etc. Its good stuff, and the worms get transplanted around our property.
    Jeez I sound like Jackie French!
    Cheers,
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Andy Mac
    Change is inevitable, growth is optional.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many
     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    "The Home of the Biting Midge" MountainCreek Qld
    Posts
    8,343
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    12

    Default

    Careful Andy, you'll inspire me to become a hippy farmer again!

    P

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toowoomba Q 4350
    Posts
    9,203
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Worm Tea! I reckon that would beat Charlie carp any day!

    So this is the secret to your thriving gardens

    Hmm, an old day bed frame aye?

    cheers
    Wendy

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Garvoc VIC AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    12,765
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    think I'll stick ter good ole black tea
    Regards, Bob Thomas

    www.wombatsawmill.com

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Pambula
    Age
    49
    Posts
    13,252
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Must get around to setting mine up. I've got the bath.

    My mate puts a bit of carpet over his, in contact with the top of the mulch.
    "I don't practice what I preach because I'm not the kind of person I'm preaching to."

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toowoomba Qld.
    Age
    55
    Posts
    2,796
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silentC View Post
    My mate puts a bit of carpet over his, in contact with the top of the mulch.
    Yep, probably more insulation, but doesn't allow in rain water. Admittedly we don't get much, but its what goes through to make the tea!

    Cheers,
    Andy Mac
    Change is inevitable, growth is optional.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Northern Beaches
    Posts
    1,016
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I had around 4-6 kg of worms in my old compost. We moved about a year back and I did not bring the compost over to the new place as there was not really any room for it. We've gone from 1/2 acre (2100sqm) property down to about 400sqm. After about 6 months I finally bought a commercial farm to suit the new house, 3 round trays with a lid on top and reservoir beneath. I went back to the old farm to gather some pedigree stock to start it off and there was nothing there. Of-course there wasn't, you have to feed the little fellows. Oh NO, all my workers gone!!!

    After some thought I brought a few kilos of compost back with me and placed it in the new farm and put some weetbix and watermelon inside. Within around 10 days I had some little workers. They had hatched from the castings, there's lots of eggs in the old compost. Six months on I have a plethora of willing workers, and the numbers have just about caught up to our vegetable waste disposal rate and the odd pizza box. Soon I hope I will have enough again to be able to start putting paper, milk cartons, etc in as well. They slow down in winter as their ideal temperature is about 21C.

    Andy Mac is there any reason why you don't put oil into your farm? Doesn't seem to bother my team, and they seem to work a bit quicker on coffee grounds.

    prozac
    Last edited by prozac; 27th May 2008 at 02:52 PM. Reason: Spoelling

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toowoomba Qld.
    Age
    55
    Posts
    2,796
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by prozac View Post
    I had around 4-6 kg of worms in my old compost. We moved about a year back and I did not bring the compost over to the new place as there was not really any room for it. We've gone from 1/2 acre (2100sqm) property down to about 400sqm. After about 6 months I finally bought a commercial farm to suit the new house, 3 round trays with a lid on top and reservoir beneath. I went back to the old farm to gather some pedigree stock to start it off and there was nothing there. Of-course there wasn't, you have to feed the little fellows. Oh NO, all my workers gone!!!

    After some thought I brought a few kilos of compost back with me and placed it in the new farm and put some weetbix and watermelon inside. Within around 10 days I had some little workers. They had hatched from the castings, there's lots of eggs in the old compost.
    Excellent news, I wondered how long they would last!
    Six months on I have a plethora of willing workers, and the numbers have just about caught up to our vegetable waste disposal rate and the odd pizza box. Soon I hope I will have enough again to be able to start putting paper, milk cartons, etc in as well. They slow down in winter as their ideal temperature is about 21C.

    Andy Mac is there any reason why you don't put oil into your farm?
    Yeah I do, everything that the chooks don't eat, just some literature gets all fussy about it!
    Doesn't seem to bother my team, and they seem to work a bit quicker on coffee grounds.

    prozac
    I heard somewhere that a group of lab scientists tried to work out the life span of an earthworm. They gave up after one lasted for 15yrs or so!!

    Cheers,
    Andy Mac
    Change is inevitable, growth is optional.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Northern Beaches
    Posts
    1,016
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    A few years back a mob of scientific types were experimenting rehabilitating an old farm that had lots of soil contamination. Heavy metals etc. I think part of the farm may have been a quarry.

    The gist of it was they set up a large scale breeding farm on site. The worms were "let loose" into the soil in a designated area & then "rounded-up" again a few days later. Don't ask me how as I can't remember, something to do with the cover of darkness. When all were accounted for they were incinerated - sounds like your average employer, "thanks for all your hard work" - and the ingested heavy metals etc weighed. They were able to turn the land from being unable to grow anything other than rocks into productive farmland once more.

    prozac

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Northern Beaches
    Posts
    1,016
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    To give some of you an idea about the efficacy of the worm tea, I watered some "kalanchoe" (sp?) with worm tea. These little succulent type plants grow to around 400mm high (15-16"). With worm tea they tower around 1.8m tall (6') !!! The other plants don't react the same way but it does show it is mighty powerful stuff.
    prozac

    ____________________________________________

    Woodworkforums, cheaper than therapy...........

Similar Threads

  1. dog poo worm farm
    By dan76n in forum LANDSCAPING, GARDENING, OUTDOORS
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12th Nov 2007, 06:59 AM
  2. As the worm turns
    By Capt. Zero in forum WOODWORK - GENERAL
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 3rd Sep 2007, 08:17 PM
  3. Blue worm
    By Jude A in forum WOODTURNING - PEN TURNING
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12th Nov 2006, 11:15 PM
  4. Wood worm.
    By Oscar555 in forum WOODWORK - GENERAL
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 22nd Feb 2005, 09:41 PM
  5. THE BUGBEAR WORM !!!!! ARE YOU NEXT???
    By soundman in forum ANNOUNCEMENTS
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 21st Oct 2002, 10:08 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •