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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    Malvern east
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    Default Timber Slab moisture question

    Hi all,

    I'm Kev from Melb, new to the Forum.

    I have a question about the acceptable moisture in my Messmate slab before I start levelling and sanding it. At the moment it is averaging around 10% with some areas as low as 7% and some closer to 12%. The piece is 1200 x 3500 and has been drying and sitting for sometime now.
    I don't want it to curl once finished and inside but wanted to ask the brains trust for best advice.

    What is an acceptable level for it to be before I start? And if still too wet is there a way to help the drying process out?

    Thanks.

    Kev

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
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    How thick is it?
    Were are you currently storing it?
    Where are you going to work on it?
    Where is it going to reside when finished?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Malvern east
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    Default

    Thanks BobL,

    Sorry I missed the thickness part.

    The Slab is 45mm thick currently, it's being stored in my garage in blocks currently. The garage is dry and water tight. I will do all the work there then it will live in my dining room which will have air/heating, some direct sun.

    thx Kev.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    bilpin
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    2,566

    Default

    Moisture content in a slab is tolerable at about 10%. The variance between 7-12% is quite normal for freshly air dried slabs. This variance will balance out with time. It's ready to work.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
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    Default

    10% air dry is ok to start working on it, it depends where you are in terms of whether its going to get much dryer.

    I know it's pretty heavy but can you store it on the long edge up against a wall in the dining room for say a month or two?
    That will give you an idea of how much it will move and then work it in the garage and it should be OK.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Malvern east
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rustynail View Post
    Moisture content in a slab is tolerable at about 10%. The variance between 7-12% is quite normal for freshly air dried slabs. This variance will balance out with time. It's ready to work.
    Thanks Rusty, itís a big slab and I needed to be sure so it doesnít go to waste once I start work. Appreciate the advice. Timber Slab moisture question


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  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Malvern east
    Posts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    10% air dry is ok to start working on it, it depends where you are in terms of whether its going to get much dryer.

    I know it's pretty heavy but can you store it on the long edge up against a wall in the dining room for say a month or two?
    That will give you an idea of how much it will move and then work it in the garage and it should be OK.
    Thanks Bob, I think it was prob kiln dried at some stage but has certainly been sitting for a while. I might try and move it into the house for a bit and see if the boss is happy with it.


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