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  1. #31
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    Those are great, Paul. I love a good hammer. I have an area dedicated for "striking" Tools which has bled over into my metalworking Tools, and two of my most recent acquisitions are a 4oz ball pein and a 12oz "raising" hammer which I think was for autobody work?

    I can only hope mine one day look as nice as yours.

    cheers,
    luke

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Matt

    I was wondering whether those ten minute handles equated to six per hour. Do you think Ian could keep it up all day with a couple of ten or fifteen minute breaks to clear the sawdust from his brow and regenerate for the next session? AND do you think we should encourage him to try that and supply a batch of hammers at no charge for him? Gee, our generosity knows no bounds.

    Aside from that, did I mention that I liked your idea for hammer storage and just to prove that I listen, have a look at this:

    Attachment 455571Attachment 455572

    So here are the ball pein family, new and old school, all neatly nestled

    Attachment 455573

    Then I thought that I preferred them balls out

    Attachment 455574

    There was plenty of space for a few more hammers (note that the ball pein family has grown another member, which I found while collecting their relatives)

    Attachment 455575

    I replaced the rasp rack on the wall ( it is removable so that when I am working on saw handles it becomes a free standing unit as I became tired of searching for the rasp among the pile.)

    Attachment 455579

    But, not everything is a good as it might be

    Attachment 455576

    The DC bags had to be hooked back up and the hammers are difficult to see paling into obscurity

    Attachment 455577

    Before becoming an extinct race once the DC bags are inflated! I will have to remember they are there.

    Attachment 455578

    Not all hammers would fit in the "Simplicity" rack. The mallets still have their own places as do Rob Streepers superb dog hammers.

    Attachment 455580

    Regards
    Paul
    Paul,
    I reckon if we can keep Ian lubricated with enough good red stuff.
    So six an hour 48, letís just call that 50 a day thatís not to bad,
    Of course we are talking Ian hear so the quality will be A1 of course.

    Iím impressed I was able to inspire you with your hammer storage that looks very good um till you canít see itBall Pein Ecstasy because of the dusty.

    Have you heard that you can convert ex shipping containers in to workshops, tool storage sheds, even homes I hear.
    That would free up a lot of storage space for you
    Just think of all the saws and hammers you could keep in there.

    Cheers Matt

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke Maddux View Post
    Those are great, Paul. I love a good hammer. I have an area dedicated for "striking" Tools which has bled over into my metalworking Tools, and two of my most recent acquisitions are a 4oz ball pein and a 12oz "raising" hammer which I think was for autobody work?

    I can only hope mine one day look as nice as yours.

    cheers,
    luke
    Luke
    Do you mean ďraising hammer or bumbing hammer.
    A raising hammer is generally used by smiths to raise a vessel on a stake.
    But nothing to do with vampires Ball Pein Ecstasy.
    What you would call in America Body man would have used a bumbling hammer to start to ruff in a panel on a sand bag or timber stump in building an auto body.
    Either one is still a handy hammer to have if you have oneBall Pein Ecstasy.

    Cheers Matt,

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post

    Have you heard that you can convert ex shipping containers in to workshops, tool storage sheds, even homes I hear.
    That would free up a lot of storage space for you
    Just think of all the saws and hammers you could keep in there.

    Cheers Matt


    Matt

    The irony is that until recently all those hammers were stored in a shipping container.

    )

    As for saws.

    )

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  6. #35
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    Spotted gum's properties and availability make it a go to timber for handles. Here's wishing you satisfying poundings in the future...
    Cheers,
    Clinton

    "Use your third eye" - Watson

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/clinton_findlay/

  7. #36
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    Paul i like that 4oz often passed on buying one never been lucky ehough yet to score one in a box of bits.
    I admire Seths hammers some very nice Damascus steel he's made.
    https://m.facebook.com/seth.wood.5811

    Handels look great love the Spotted Gum grain.

    Something I was taught in making an engineers ball pein handle was to leave a radius/round butt so when you hand slides back along the shaft it has something to prevent it from coming out of your hand.

    Sent from my SM-T580 using Tapatalk

    EDITED TO ADD PHOTO.

    These are not ball pein, but after trying mine out the fellow asked could I do his blacksmith hammers the same. Note knob at end of shaft this is turned on centre but shaped down to off centre shape.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #37
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    Digressing slightly from the top quality wood handles, I was lucky enough to pick up a 32oz Estwing ball-pein hammer in a job lot of a few tools at a good price - seller didnít know what it was or what it was worth. It wasnít mentioned in the description and featured in one of the last pictures, blurred, poor light and easy to miss.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #38
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    Well, that’s frustrating, I lost about two thirds of the post, not to mention that the after pic is before the before pic. I promise it looks better after my fiddling.

    This hammer has clearly been well used, and was not a shelf ornament, which is quite probably why the leather rings hadn’t dried out and become loose or broken and fallen out. I’ll never know whose it was but it’s nice having a link to someone who clearly knew what hard work is and liked good tools.

    I cleaned the rust using wet and dry with Q20 (a generic version), until the metal started shining through, then attacked the handle with some sandpaper until the handle was fairly smooth with clean leather showing. Then over the next few days I gave it between eight and ten coats of clear lacquer from a spray can. I’d read up quite a bit before I did the first Estwing handle I restored and found many posts on forums asking for advice and very few (actually just the one) post from someone who’d actually done it. Most replies advocates some form of oil for the leather, with one saying the last he had done quite a few and usd clear lacquer, so I decided to get it as close to original as possible and followed his advice.

    The lacquer stayed tacky after about the third coat, but I kept on going (roughened with 800grit and later 0000 steel wool between coats) until it built up some depth, and then let it cure until it was no longer tacky and was nice and hard. This actually took a while - a couple of weeks, during which time it’s best to keep it suspended so that the handle doesn’t rest on the workbench. The first one I did (on my 40 year old hatchet) it has a flaw where I left it on the workbench a week after the last coat went on. I just left his one in the vice between coats and while curing.

    All in all I’m happy with my efforts, and given that they don’t seem to make the ball-pein hammers with the leather handles anymore am very happy with the purchase. I’ve got my eye one a pair of claw hammers, one of which will need the leather replaced, which I’m not sure if I’m up to or not. If the price doesn’t get much higher, I suppose I’ll find out.

  10. #39
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    Colin, I always wondered how one would replace the leather on those handles if it became damaged or dried out & cracked off. It was put on in the first place, so obviously it must be possible to replace it. Would you need some kind of press to compress rings so they end up nice & tight? And did they use any glue between the rings, or are they simply squashed together?

    I wouldn't have thought of using lacquer on the handle; coming from a farming background, I would've automatically looked for some neatsfoot oil, which was the standard treatment for any 'working' leather item. Isn't there a risk of the lacquer cracking & crazing over time?

    Cheers,
    IW

  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin62 View Post
    Digressing slightly from the top quality wood handles, I was lucky enough to pick up a 32oz Estwing ball-pein hammer in a job lot of a few tools at a good price - seller didn’t know what it was or what it was worth. It wasn’t mentioned in the description and featured in one of the last pictures, blurred, poor light and easy to miss.
    Thanks for posting that Colin.

    I wasn't even aware Eastwing did a ball pein version. You have done a very good restoration on that one. It is nice to think of these tools being resuscitated.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  12. #41
    Boringgeoff is offline Try not to be late, but never be early.
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    Digressing even further, apologies in advance. I've had this Geologists Hammer for over 40 years and have always thought it was by Estwing but there is no branding visible. When I got it the leather handle was crumbling and some of the discs had fallen off. I replaced the leather with sash cord and it's lasted well. The method of wrapping the cord has a name which I've forgotten, you make a loop and run it along the length of the handle with a tail hanging down then start wrapping the cord tightly. when you reach the end with the loop you feed the cord through it then drag down on the "tail" which pulls the loop under the wraps. Clear as mud? The end has a door hook retainer riveted on but I can't remember whether they are the original rivets or if I welded two extensions to the end of the handle.
    Right, back to ballpein hammers.
    Cheers,
    Geoff.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boringgeoff View Post
    The method of wrapping the cord has a name which I've forgotten, you make a loop and run it along the length of the handle with a tail hanging down then start wrapping the cord tightly. when you reach the end with the loop you feed the cord through it then drag down on the "tail" which pulls the loop under the wraps. Clear as mud? .
    Also known as a hangman's knot.

  14. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturdee View Post
    Also known as a hangman's knot.
    That's what I thought too .

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  15. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturdee View Post
    Also known as a hangman's knot.
    Close... but knot quite.

    That description matches a heaving line, if you tie it without the benefit of a hammer handle through the middle it allows a rope end to be weighted for throwing. A hammer handle improves the castability of the line, but degrades itís catch ability at the other end.
    [IMG]blob:http://www.woodworkforums.com/69b51529-7c62-402c-93d0-24221a2486ee[/IMG]

    Geoffís wrapping of the handle with cord would be better described as plain whipping (or serving with a bit of a push).
    A thief stole my anti-depressants. I hope heís happy now.

  16. #45
    Boringgeoff is offline Try not to be late, but never be early.
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    The hammer has been used for a throwing weight to get a rope over a branch to hang the camping shower off.

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