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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by FenceFurniture View Post
    .....How does the brass attach to the handle? Where I'm going here is could you screw the brass onto the spoke shave and then fit the handle to the brass to save the fiddling around part?
    Brett, the brass is just a trim washer. The handle is attached by a 'hanger bolt'. I'm having a brain fade here (LOML & I have just sat & chatted for an hour plus over a bottle of red), & can't remember if that's the North American name for it. Anyway, it's a 1/4" NC bolt at one end, which screws into the body of the shave, & the other is a blunt wood-screw that screws into the wood. So you see, it's a matter of just screwing the wood back & forth a bit to get it to tighten where you want it to.

    I can think of a way to make it easier, make a stud that goes right through the handle. Put a countersink in the outer end of the handle, and attach it with a cup-nut like on the totes of your typical Stanley plane. Then you would simply slide the handle over the stud & tighten it down at whatever angle you please.

    I probably talked up the difficulty too much, it's really just a matter of patience and fiddling til you get it right. Now it's in the right spot, I'm hoping I will never have to think about it again, unless I decide I want them at a slightly different angle.....

    Cheers,
    IW

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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Brett, the brass is just a trim washer. The handle is attached by a 'hanger bolt'. I'm having a brain fade here (LOML & I have just sat & chatted for an hour plus over a bottle of red), & can't remember if that's the North American name for it. Anyway, it's a 1/4" NC bolt at one end, which screws into the body of the shave, & the other is a blunt wood-screw that screws into the wood. So you see, it's a matter of just screwing the wood back & forth a bit to get it to tighten where you want it to.

    I can think of a way to make it easier, make a stud that goes right through the handle. Put a countersink in the outer end of the handle, and attach it with a cup-nut like on the totes of your typical Stanley plane. Then you would simply slide the handle over the stud & tighten it down at whatever angle you please.
    could you use an insert nut

    and adjust the depth of the nut to get the alignment "just right"?
    regards from Canada

    ian

  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    ...could you use an insert nut and adjust the depth of the nut to get the alignment "just right"?...
    Ian, I guess I haven't explained myself very clearly. Putting an insert in the wood would not help at all, in fact it would make things worse. Take a look at LVs handle replacement kit and I think you will immediately grasp the situation.

    The coarse-thread end of the 'connector' is screwed into the wood, which I pre-drilled on the lathe to keep it straight & centred. That was dead easy, once I figured out the right-sized hole for end-grain in she-oak (7/32 was as close to the Goldilocks point as I could get). The trim washer is tapped for the metal-thread end , i.e., the part that goes into the shave body (1/4" NC),. That's handy because it can be screwed onto the stud as a reference point.

    So now you just screw the handle into the body til it snugs up to the washer. With a round handle, it matters little at which point it snugs up, but with shaped handles, you obviously want them to tighten at a precise point so the the 'flats' on the handles are oriented just so. The way to achieve that is simple, you just remove the handle, and screw it a bit more, or back it off a bit, then try again (& again & again!).

    I've used those brass inserts you show quite a bit, & one thing I can tell you is that they are a bear to fit in end-grain of very hard woods. The hole has to be just right - they won't go into a hole drilled to the minor diameter like they'll do for softer woods. Too tight & they either seize halfway in, or you split the wood, Too loose, they won't hold properly. But apart from that, it would only make matters worse when trying to position the handles because you would have to screw the insert back & forth to alter the tighten point. Once they're properly in, those things are very difficult to move!

    As I said, I whinged too much about it, it isn't rocket science, just needs patience, something I need to cultivate more...

    Cheers,
    IW

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