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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Millmerran,QLD
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    68
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Better still, buy a decent 1/8" chisel if you don't have one
    Ian

    I agree, but suspect the smaller sizes might not be readily available from the likes of Bunnings or M10 type hardware chains. Also being a less common size they may not be cheap either and I was trying not to spend all Lance's money for him at this early stage of development. I thought we might lure him into the addiction with claims of a low cost hobby and then go for the hard aspects once he is well and truly hooked.

    Both you and I also have custom made narrow chisels but as I explained this is not the easiest path to follow. Another clean out tool for corners can be a broken off hacksaw blade, but be careful how you hold it particularly if you don't have a holder for it.

    Lance

    I think you will work something out because as Ian has commented you seem to get things done super quick (and put me especially to shame ) and have a certain resourcefulness that will get you out of trouble.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    264

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    What a journey this has been, and what a transformation.

    Last week my pear wood arrived for the handles, and the bolts arrived in the late mail on Thursday, all ready for my Friday off. Yesterday involved cutting out the handle and shaping the handle. I've been reading about rasps, as my current file collection consists of some old steel files and newer Aldi types. How a nice rasp would have simplified the shaping process. None the less, the router with a round over bit took care of the large radiuses, whilst a huge effort with sand paper took care of the minor curves and smoothing the router marks.

    As my smallest chisel is 6 mm, I fashioned a 3.5 mm chisel from an unused cheep screwdriver as per Paul's suggestion. It worked a treat in cutting out the recess for the spine. A much better result than my test handle. And I now have a small chisel for other projects too!

    20190525_102423.jpg

    I had to trim the saw plate to fit the new handle profile, so again used Ian's method, but this time used a flat guide bar which worked perfectly. I figured that rather than continue the cut all the way at the new angle, why not leave a little tail, following the contour of the handle. I think it worked rather nicely.

    20190525_102510.jpg 20190525_104639.jpg

    Drilling out the bolt holes proved a triumph. Ian had provided me with wonderful detail of how to prepare for and set the bolts. I read it once when he sent it, and again directly before doing anything permanent. I borrowed a 1/2 " spade bit from my dad as I have no imperial bits. It was a little blunt; good thing I've recently acquired my saw sharpening badge, as this allowed me to put a nice edge on the spade bit. the holes were nice and crisp. Following Ian's suggestion, I knocked the bolts in a little way to leave an impression of the square section, and using my new mini chisel, pared and hacked out a rough approximation of a square.

    20190525_102316.jpg 20190525_102250.jpg

    Finally it was time for a test assembly. The only issue was that I didn't have a split washer driver, and looking around the shed, I really wasn't keen on grinding away the thinnest steel stock I had on hand until it was thin enough. Then it dawned on me, why not simply use some of the blade off-cut. And that's what I did. I fashioned a handle out of some spotted gum, as it's very hard, and should resist the twisting of the blade well (and it did). The "blade" is held in with epoxy, so was left overnight to dry.

    20190525_104304.jpg

    Whilst the screwdriver was drying, I put on several coats of shellac. It was a little cool yesterday, so gave it a little more time for the alcohol to evaporate before adding subsequent coats. I wrote my name and date below the cow's tongue then applied about five coats in total.

    8a3961eb89e86580335f87d31acabd87.jpg

    I left it all to set overnight, and bright and early this morning I gave the handle a rub with steel wool, and applied a coat of wax. Good thing my new favourite finishing technique (shellac, steel wool, wax)is so versatile! And because I'm not a complete savage I shaped my new screwdriver so that it was comfortable in the hand.

    Final assembly time.

    20190525_102551.jpg 20190525_104153.jpg

    I think it is simply stunning, and am so pleased with the result. The only problem now is that I can't simply hang it alongside the rest of my saws. This one needs somewhere special. Another reason to forge ahead with my tool cabinet.

    This post is sponsored by Ian and Mike, who very generously donated the saw bolts and pear wood. Thank-you, your gift is truly appreciated.

    And just because it's nice to remember where it all started.

    20190510_123150.jpg

    Lance
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  4. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Brisbane (western suburbs)
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    73
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    Well Lance, you definitely get a high distinction for that assignment. The handle looks great, and it's even got a bit of figure to it, which I've not seen in Pear before, it's usually a rather bland, pale wood.

    What a fun time you've had these last few months, acquiring knowledge & skills at a head-spinning rate!

    Now you're thoroughly hooked on this saw-making business, that saw needs a nice little dovetailer to sit alongside it in the new till you're contemplating.

    Umm, make sure to leave a bit of room for a couple more saws, I think you might end up needing it.....
    IW

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Millmerran,QLD
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    Lance

    I have to echo Ian's comments, but it is better coming from him. Also thank you for using the pear (and to Mike) as I am not familiar with it and have not seen it before. I too have been a recipient of Wilkie saw screws and you have done them proud. Actually that reminds me I have some saw screws supplied by Rob Streeper and I will have to come up with a suitable project for those too. Thinking, thinking.....

    Well done.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,945

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    Lance,
    11/10 that is a fantastic result especially since it was your first saw WOW you should be extremely proud of that effort.
    An to think it starts of as a ugly duckling from a chain store.
    It really does show you should not judge a book by its cover,
    But also re in forces what Ian as been telling us for years to use the saw plate an junk the rest.

    Cheers Matt
    Thereís another one coming isnít there ??

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    699

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    I’ve had fun following the progress, and what an improvement! Well done.

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    264

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    Thanks for the encouragement everyone. Before any more saws though (and yes, a small dovetail saw is on the cards), I want/need to build a new bench, tool cabinet, wall unit for the lounge, bookshelves, and I have three half finished boxes on the bench at the moment that need to be completed sooner rather than later. I'm not complaining though, how wonderful to have a hobby that can be so engaging.

    Lance

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Brisbane (western suburbs)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xfigio View Post
    ....I want/need to build ..... tool cabinet, wall unit for the lounge, bookshelves, and I have three half finished boxes on the bench ......
    Now that list tells me you need a good dovetail saw, like, now!


    You may come to rue the day you logged in to this section.
    Cheers,
    IW

  10. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,945

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xfigio View Post
    Thanks for the encouragement everyone. Before any more saws though (and yes, a small dovetail saw is on the cards), I want/need to build a new bench, tool cabinet, wall unit for the lounge, bookshelves, and I have three half finished boxes on the bench at the moment that need to be completed sooner rather than later. I'm not complaining though, how wonderful to have a hobby that can be so engaging.

    Lance
    So new saw, at your cracking pass one two weeks at the outmost?Reducing the set on my tenon saw (and becoming a butcher)


    Cheers Matt

  11. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    264

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    haha. We'll see.

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