Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Shooting advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Leopold, Victoria
    Age
    60
    Posts
    3,205

    Default Shooting advice

    Just wanting to know if you are meant to slightly pull a shooting plane away from the timber on the return stroke.
    I had a sharpening session yesterday and was using my freshly sharpened No.5 low angle plane today to clean up the end of some pieces of Blackwood. After shooting the first piece I found that the plane was skipping across the endgrain of the next piece. When I checked the blade I found that the back of the blade seemed to be bubbed over slightly loosing its razor edge. I removed the blade and put it on the strop to redo the edge. After this it cut again okay so I decided to lift it slightly away from the timber on the pull strike. Doing this the blade stayed sharp and I was able to do the rest of the pieces.
    The plane is a Luban and I thought that the steel in the blade may not be as hard as it needs to be for this job or could it be something in the Blackwood abrading the edge?

    Thanks,
    Dallas

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,688

    Default

    Years & years ago when I was taught woodworking, we were told to lift the plane off the work after each stoke to reduce wear on the blade. Along with the other plane commandment (putting the plane on its side when you put it down), I decided to put theory to test & quit doing both. That was a very long time ago, I've honoured both rules in the breach rather than the observance ever since, & I have to say my blades seem to last just as long as anyone else's between sharpenings.

    On the return stroke, particularly when you are shooting with the plane on its side, there is very little pressure on the back of the blade, so I reckon any wear from the back-stroke is liable to be minimal. There are a couple of potential explanations for your experience, but if you get the results you want by lifting the plane away on the return, and it doesn't wreck your rhythm, that's the way to go. It certainly won't do any harm....

    Cheers,
    IW

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Leopold, Victoria
    Age
    60
    Posts
    3,205

    Default

    I did try 2 different approaches. Pulling the plane away seemed like hard work after a while so I kept the plane in a straight line and just released the pressure of the wood against the sole of the plane and that seemed to work okay as well.

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for trouble shooting advice
    By tomartomau in forum TABLE SAWS & COMBINATIONS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2nd Feb 2016, 03:44 PM
  2. Shooting boards
    By chook in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 25th Jun 2012, 07:15 AM
  3. Shooting board plane advice.
    By Too Many Clamps in forum HAND TOOLS - UNPOWERED
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 20th Sep 2010, 06:05 PM
  4. Shooting from the lip
    By wheelinround in forum NOTHING AT ALL TO DO WITH WOODWORK
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12th Aug 2008, 06:23 PM
  5. Shooting boards again
    By jmk89 in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 9th Sep 2006, 02:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •