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  1. #16
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    Here are some pictures of my Stanley No. 60. My jig doesn't have a patent date on it which I think would indicate that it is a later model than John's. Mine was probably produced after the patent protection afforded by the 1909 patent had lapsed.



    It has an inch scale underneath instead of on top like the later models.



    As Bob has already pointed out the No. 60 came with 9 guides, 1/4 inch to 3/4 inch in 1/16 inch steps.



    The even 1/16 guides (i.e. 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 5/8 & 3/4) all fit inside one another as do the odd 1/16 guides (i.e. 5/16, 7/16, 9/16 & 11/16).



    I also have an F.H. Prager dowel jig that is similar to and probably based on a Stanley jig.



    I find that the F.H. Prager jig is not as rigid as the Stanley. When you clamp the jigs onto a piece of wood, the F.H. Prager flexes a little whereas the Stanley doesn't flex noticeably. The drill guides from the F.H. Prager are however more robust than those that came with the Stanley and are therefore more suited to use with a power drill. Remember that the Stanley ones were designed for use with a brace and bit. I therefore tend to use the Stanley jig with the F.H. Prager drill guides if I'm doing any dowelling.
    Regards,
    Ian.

    A larger version of my avatar picture can be found here. It is a scan of the front cover of the May 1960 issue of Woodworker magazine.

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  3. #17
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    Apr 2007
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    Ian
    Thanks for the info. I knew from Derekís post that I didnít have any guides but then I learned I also didnít have the stop that you identified for Bob. My grandfather used discarded tobacco tins to store random parts. I have looked through them without success as yet but will keep looking.

    At first I had trouble viewing the patent information but eventually was able to get it. It is interesting to note that the drawings indicate a knurled knob for clamping the jig to the work.
    <O
    Thanks again and if anyone has an idea about the anonymous No. 80 scraper plane Iíd love to hear from you.
    John

  4. #18
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    I don't have the Stanley model, but have used a Silex version for many years, in fact this one pictured was used by my dad, then me, pretty constantly since the early 60's. Many, many pieces of furniture and toys constructed using it. Registration of the holes has never seemed a real issue. I guess I was brought up using dowel joints, and don't own a biscuit joiner, and will continue to use dowels despite there perceived weakness.
    Also pictured is a more elaborate dowel jig which I've never seen before, bought as part of a very extensive tool collection. Its a Record #148 and has at least 2 drill guides fitted, but I think its incomplete as pictured. I think it needs 3 of the bars holding the guides to really clamp securely. I've only used it a couple of times, and have a feeling there is another guide stashed somewhere in my shed?? Anyone else seen or used this contraption?

    Cheers,
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Andy Mac
    Change is inevitable, growth is optional.

  5. #19
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    Bunnings no longer sell this style of jig, but do sell the HARON jigs.

  6. #20
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    Oh, and BTW you can still buy sleeves for the Stanley #59 doweling jig
    http://www.stanleytoolparts.com/misc...welingjig.html

  7. #21
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    I have the Silex No. 30 Dowelling jig, which is identical to Andy Mac's picture.

    My grandfather bought it in the fifties as far as I can ascertain. I inherited it when he passed away in 1965 and at some stages I've used it heavily.

    It is extremely accurate and the joining of two pieces of of timber can be beautiful, even with softwood.

    Mine still has it's original box complete with the instruction sheet.

    Mick.

  8. #22
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    Oct 2001
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    While I have used a Silex No 30 dowling jig, i find even easier and if not more accurate the Aussie multi jig particularly for edge joining boards. Yes its expensive enough but its paid for itself through the absolute simplicity of its use and perfection of result making it my preference for dowling where the job suits.

    The Aussie multi jig made setup for drilling ~400 odd holes in making a cot very simple, imaging sqinting and aligning the v groove with you pencil mark for that many holes in an afternoon.

    Rocker has a valid point despite other opinion, as its very easy to be innaccurate inusing the silex type or stanley type dowling jig. Very easy to be out by up to half a milimetre when your markout line gets thick, get too far out and it requires greater force to push the boards together. still workable though if you are lucky, soft wood like derek is using is very forgiving. Just needs care in individually drilling every hole independantly.

    Steve

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by US-Oz View Post
    Oh, and BTW you can still buy sleeves for the Stanley #59 doweling jig
    http://www.stanleytoolparts.com/misc...welingjig.html
    They might as well sell the whole thing, there isnt much missing from those spare parts is there? only the V holding the tube as far as I can see.
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    you get a warm feeling for a while but nobody notices.

  10. #24
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    Don't know if anybody will see this after all this time but those pictures of the Record 148 show it set up incorrectly.
    The fences on the drill guides should BOTH be on the one side and placed against the face side of the work piece .
    All the pieces do appear to be there.
    Cheers
    Geoff
    GeoffS
    my web page - http://users.ncable.com.au/gsyme/woodwork/

  11. #25
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    Default Stanley No. 59 Doweling Jig

    Derek,

    I agree with your comments about this doweling jig. Mine must be about 60 years old and still works perfectly. I use it often.

    Ken

  12. #26
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    Hi Kenneth

    Welcome to the forums.

    And you made the perfect entrance - agreeing with me! (I am just kidding ))

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, many handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  13. #27
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    I suppose one could use dowels when edge jointing boards, if one wanted to add the extra time and work and risk the chance of misalignment. When glue alone is strong enough and a simple hammer tap will bring well jointed, clamped boards into alignment, I, and a majority of professional wood workers prefer to use this more elegant method.

    Cheers
    Michael

  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mic-d View Post
    ... and risk the chance of misalignment.
    Don't make me laugh, it will wake the family.

    Perfect alignment is the major strength of a quality dowelling jig, like Ozzie or Dowelmax. Not only perfectly aligned, but without the hassles of loosen clamp, bash board, tighten clamp, move to next clamp.

    I'll even cede the same advantage to the Domino over your method.

    Faster AND better.
    ... as long as the government is perceived as working for the benefit of children, the people will happily endure almost any curtailment of liberty and almost any deprivation. (A.Hitler)

  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mic-d View Post
    ... and risk the chance of misalignment.
    Don't make me laugh, it will wake the family.

    Perfect alignment is the major strength of a quality dowelling jig, like Ozzie or Dowelmax. Not only perfectly aligned, but without the hassles of loosen clamp, bash board, tighten clamp, move to next clamp, start all over again.

    I'll even cede the same advantage to the Domino over your method.

    Faster AND better.
    ... as long as the government is perceived as working for the benefit of children, the people will happily endure almost any curtailment of liberty and almost any deprivation. (A.Hitler)

  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Dunn View Post
    Don't make me laugh, it will wake the family.

    Perfect alignment is the major strength of a quality dowelling jig, like Ozzie or Dowelmax. Not only perfectly aligned, but without the hassles of loosen clamp, bash board, tighten clamp, move to next clamp, start all over again.

    I'll even cede the same advantage to the Domino over your method.

    Faster AND better.
    No need to loosen clamps. Presumably one is gluing perfectly flat boards resting on good quality sash clamps resting on a flat assembly table. The boards, if needing a tap at all, need only a small one. Of course if one lacks the skill to flatten a board and properly joint edges then dowelling is a good refuge.
    And it ain't my method, I learnt it from a professional woodworker and woodwork teacher, would you like to take it up with him?

    Cheers
    Michael

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