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  1. #1
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    Default TSB-10HB: 10 amp or 15 amp plug?

    From previous posts, it seems clear that the plug supplied can be either 10amp or 15 amp. Mine has a 10amp plug, and seems to run well, though it is connected to a powerpoint that is protected by a 20amp circuit breaker. Obviously other folks have their connected by 15amp plug.
    There is no information re this situation in the awful supplied manual, and even the Grizzly manual is not helpful given that it deals with USA electrical set-up.
    So my question is: Is this an important issue, or does it not matter? Does anyone have genuine authoritative information? If so, I'd love to hear it.

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  3. #2
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    Sorry, I don't have any genuine authorative information for you but there was a good 15amp discussion happening over in 'Welding' recently that might help . . . http://www.woodworkforums.com/f160/15amp-plugs-114547/
    Cheers

  4. #3
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    You say yours has a 10 amp plug. The important question is, did it come supplied with a 10 amp plug when purchased new.

    Lots of people have changed the 15 amp plug on similar machines to a 10 amp plug, and used them that way without drama... for a time. But be aware that if you or someone else changed the plug, or modified the plug to fit a 10 amp socket, you have no warranty. If and when the motor fails, you are on your own.
    Note to self: Mallet wins over wrist every time.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by switt775 View Post
    You say yours has a 10 amp plug. The important question is, did it come supplied with a 10 amp plug when purchased new.
    When I bought mine it came supplied with a 10 amp plug, factory fitted. From memory at start up it draws about 9 amps but then drops down to about 5 amps. A search should show the exact details, search for TSC-10hb posted by Gatiep who did the calcs.

    Peter.

  6. #5
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    Mine also seems to be factory fitted. I tried a search as recommended by Sturdee, but could not locate the post. Anyone got a link to it?

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by adeben View Post
    From previous posts, it seems clear that the plug supplied can be either 10amp or 15 amp. Mine has a 10amp plug, and seems to run well, though it is connected to a powerpoint that is protected by a 20amp circuit breaker. Obviously other folks have their connected by 15amp plug.
    There is no information re this situation in the awful supplied manual, and even the Grizzly manual is not helpful given that it deals with USA electrical set-up.
    So my question is: Is this an important issue, or does it not matter? Does anyone have genuine authoritative information? If so, I'd love to hear it.
    When I had my 10HB, I had an electrician install 15 Amp circuit ( I had a 15 amp plug). After it was done he asked me what I was going to run on it as he wanted to understand the loads I would be placing on the system. He then measured the current draw of the 10HB which was at all times below 9 amps and usually peaked at 8.3. He ended up putting a 10 amp plug on it so I could use it anywhere in the workshop.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by switt775 View Post
    You say yours has a 10 amp plug. The important question is, did it come supplied with a 10 amp plug when purchased new.

    Lots of people have changed the 15 amp plug on similar machines to a 10 amp plug, and used them that way without drama... for a time. But be aware that if you or someone else changed the plug, or modified the plug to fit a 10 amp socket, you have no warranty. If and when the motor fails, you are on your own.
    I'm not sure that a 10 amp plug in itself would disqualify the machine for warranty ( which must also be provided by law). The modification would have to be in some way linked to the failure. I doubt that a 10 amp plug could in any way cause a motor failure for the 10hb.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by adeben View Post
    Mine also seems to be factory fitted. I tried a search as recommended by Sturdee, but could not locate the post. Anyone got a link to it?
    The link to the post is here and this link to Dean's on line tool review may also be helpful to new TSC-10HB owners.


    Peter.

  10. #9
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    If your saw came delivered new with a 10 amp plug, you are in the clear.

    If anyone has
    a) changed the plus to a 10 amp plug
    b) Modified the plug so it will fit in a 10 amp outlet, or
    c) connected the saw and run it on a 10 amp circuit (such as by using a modified lead)

    then the vendor can and probably will declare your warranty to be void. I know, I've been there.

    As to why some saws need a 15 amp circuit and some are fine on 10 amps (even though they have the same HP rating), the most likely reason is the quality of a motor. Not all motors rated at 3 HP draw the same amount of current, nor do they put out the same power. I'll leave it to those more qualfied to explain the reasons why. But as a general rule, Chinese motors sold here tend to be less efficient than the average. I believe that generalisation is still valid, and is largely based on items being "built to a price" rather than the ability of Chinese companies to build quality goods, but will likely change over time.
    Note to self: Mallet wins over wrist every time.

  11. #10
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    Switt,

    I have no doubt the vendors will cry foul and try to stop a warranty claim regardless of the cause of the problem if the plug was changed. But that is not supported by consumer law, particularly if the change was made by a person qualified to make a call on the matter. Some motor manufacturers used to try to void warranties for the same reasons but have since been forced to accept that the modification must contribute to the problem. Changing the shock absorbers for example, will not void the warranty for an engine failure.

    Having said that, some dealers may still look to any excuse not to pay out for a warranty claim and then the consumer has to take some form of action, which can be a hassle.

  12. #11
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    At the time I was given a bunch of what sounded like double-talk from the vendor, being the "expert opinion" of an electrician as to the extra strain which a 3hp motor was subjected to when run on a 10 amp circuit. I didn't believe it, but decided it was not worth the time trying to take legal action against a vendor in another state.

    So for the cost of a 3HP motor a certain WA vendor of woodworking tools has forever lost me as a customer.
    Note to self: Mallet wins over wrist every time.

  13. #12
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    Sorry to hear about your experience. I think I know the retailer to whom you refer and the experience would not have been pleasant.

    Given that the current draw doesn't come close to 10 amps, its very disappointing they took this attitude. Like you, I think their "electrician's" opinion is a bit of a worry. I used an electrician who has an excellent reputation for my electrical fit out out. He changed the plug (his idea) after assuring me that there could be no downside to the motor or the house electrics for doing this.

  14. #13
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    Thanks, Sturdee, for the link. I have just double-checked, and the 10 amp plug on my machine is moulded on, obviously factory-fitted.
    My shed is wired directly to its own circuitbreaker on the main house switchboard via a 30 amp line. At the shed, that line is connected to another switchboard that has four circuitbreakers therein, one 8 amp for lights, and three 20 amp units for power. Thus there are three power circuits in the shed, and one of those is dedicated to the table saw and the dust extractor. The others feed general 10 amp outlets.
    I might just leave things as they are!

  15. #14
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    If the rated current of the saw is less than 10A then there is no reason why it can't be fitted with a 10A plug.
    However, if the plug is changed from 15A to 10A on a machine that does have a rated current of more than 10A the argument could be made that damage may have occcured to the motor due to the voltage drop in the 10A circiut it was connected to, since operating a motor on a lower voltage than it is designed for can cause damage (eg. if the supply voltage gets pulled down to 200V at the input of the saw due to the cable size in the circiut being insufficent).

  16. #15
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    Abeden,
    Try to see what the current rating is given as on your motor nameplate. If it is less than 10 Amps your plug is correct. If the current rating is more than 10 Amps but less than 15 Amps then you need a 15 Amp plug connected. Typically a 3 horsepower motor requires a 15 Amp plug. For your saw I would expect the circuit breaker supplying you socket outlet is there to protect your cabling installation in the wallup to the socket outlet. You should have a stop / start box on your machine that has a contactor with matching thermal overload to protect your motor.

    Could help more if there were good photos of your motor nameplate (fixed to the side of your motor) and the stop / start box.

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