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  1. #1
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    Default H.Boker Fret saw,

    A little hoilday project was this H.Boker fret saw that had been hanging on my workshop door crying to have some attention.

    So ,we gave it some, sorry no process pics, but Iím sure you all know the story, pull it apart remove rust.
    I then turned up a new handle in Olive Wood , such a beautiful gorgeous timber to work and turn.

    Put it all back together,and now to find something else to do H.Boker Fret saw,.

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  3. #2
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    Feb 2019
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    Adelaide, Australia
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    Default

    That olive wood looks great. I love a good "Before and After", especially when a tool goes from sitting in the corner to becoming a real user.

  4. #3
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    Default

    Thanks CB

    There is something special about using a tool you either make or restore yourself.

    Cheers Matt.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Millmerran,QLD
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    Default

    Yes Matt

    A very nice job indeed. The hacksaw/fret saw/coping saw brigade are all very useable old tools as well. Also some interesting items in the backdrop. Looks like three old Stanley No.42 saw sets. This is very topical for me as I have just deliberately purchased a saw set (different brand) as opposed to coming in a bundle of goods which is how I acquired most saw sets, and a small 8" hacksaw. Is that an early D8 behind? Can't quite see the number.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  6. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Yes Matt

    A very nice job indeed. The hacksaw/fret saw/coping saw brigade are all very useable old tools as well. Also some interesting items in the backdrop. Looks like three old Stanley No.42 saw sets. This is very topical for me as I have just deliberately purchased a saw set (different brand) as opposed to coming in a bundle of goods which is how I acquired most saw sets, and a small 8" hacksaw. Is that an early D8 behind? Can't quite see the number.

    Regards
    Paul
    Paul,
    Will you stop just helping your self to a perv around my shop every time I post picsH.Boker Fret saw,H.Boker Fret saw,.
    Please some dignity.

    Are we now branching out in too saw sets too.
    Yes they are Stanley no 42 funny you should perv on them I was thinking the black one could do with a fresh paint jobH.Boker Fret saw,.


    Donít think there D8 handle saws the three to the left are all small back saws.(unfortunately Iím back in Melbourne H.Boker Fret saw,)

    Cheers Matt.

  7. #6
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    Default

    Excalty the same saw is on eBay
    Ahrems Goodline Germany.

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F323704639461

    Different brand tho,thatís interesting anyone any ideas.

    Cheers Matt.

  8. #7
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    Default

    We were looking at different pix!

    This is the one I was talking about:

    Matt's Disston.jpg

    I have very little idea about the back saws as they are rather secretively hidden away. However, now you mention it, I can see a No.9 backsaw with the Reagan handle. The one above it with the open handle and split nuts could be a British saw with the prominent fleck in the Beech handle.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  9. #8
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    Default

    Your spot on Paul,
    Yes that is a D8
    I take back all my rude remarks about being a perv.
    An also spot on about the other three back saws.

    I hand out out extra points if you can date them H.Boker Fret saw,.

    Cheers Matt,

  10. #9
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    Default

    Does that mean I am just a plain old perv, but not with the associated rudeness?

    As far as dating the saws, you have hidden some of the clues. The No.9 I think could range between 1910 and 1920 and the split nut will be prior to 1890 probably.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
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    Default

    This was one of the first tools I made all pretty and brought back into working order. It was a few years ago.
    I picked a good first target, as the rust looked bad but was very light and easily sanded off. I sanded the handle by chucking it in drill and then put on a few coats of shellac.

    IMG_0239.jpg IMG_0343.jpg



    I also got this old saw the other day, which I plan to turn into my dovetail waste removal device. You can see in the pick it looks quite dirty. This was taken after I took off a substantial amount of rust and grime.
    It also took me about an hour to get the thumb screws loose. A little project for the coming months.

    IMG_0738.jpg

  12. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post
    Excalty the same saw is on eBay
    Ahrems Goodline Germany.

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F323704639461

    Different brand tho,that’s interesting anyone any ideas.

    Cheers Matt.
    Matt

    It is similar but not quite the same. Check the curve of the frame on the non handle side.

    I found myself wondering exactly what the difference is between the coping, fret and jeweller's saws. The coping saw seems to have a blade capable of rotation while the fret saw is fixed but has a much deeper frame. The jeweller's saw seems to have that sliding adjustment to the frame. However more research seems to indicate a degree of overlap and it may be more to do with the fineness of the blade which allows for tighter radii.

    Thoughts?

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  13. #12
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    Default

    Paul,

    You are spot on AGAIN after considering the points you pointed out and an in depth study of the pics (about 4 seconds)
    Well spotted,

    Cheers Matt.

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