Page 10 of 44 FirstFirst ... 5678910111213141520 ... LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 655
  1. #136
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,762
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Joubert Gaboon Marine Ply

    It has been a long wait, but the marine ply finally arrived today from Denman Marine in Tasmania. Andrew Denman is a professional boat builder in a little town called Kettering in the south of Tasmania on the D'Entrecasteux Channel. He became disenchanted with the marine ply offerings generally available in Australia, so decided to import the highly regarded Joubert Gaboon (also known as Okoume) ply from France himself and also supply us amateurs. Check out his website to learn more about Joubert Okoume marine ply: Denman Marine - BS1088 Gaboon Marine Plywood

    I too was not happy with the generally inferior quality of marine ply locally available, so I was prepared to wait for the good stuff, and it IS good stuff.

    This is how it arrived:
    The six sheets of 6mm 5-ply were sandwiched between two sheets of sacrificial ply, and were wrapped in thick white plastic. Packaging was excellent and the edges and corners were well protected with special heavy duty cardboard angle packing. The whole lot was supported by a framework made of 4x2 pine and strapped up with steel strapping. 10/10 Andrew, thanks!

    Click on an image to see a large version.

    This is lovely stuff. I'm very happy with it.

    100_6817.jpg 100_6819.jpg 100_6823.jpg 100_6822.jpg

    100_6826.jpg 100_6829.jpg 100_6832.jpg 100_6833.jpg

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many
     
  3. #137
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,762
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My first mistake...No doubt one of many to come! A few weeks ago, cutting the Hoop Pine top frame for the transom was a disaster. I had left the jigsaw in "pendulum mode" and the blade twisted badly creating a terribly skewed cut. I had just put it away to deal with "later".

    Yesterday I cut it off, planed the edge straight with my #6 and glued on a 20mm piece of Hoop, so all is well!

    Never throw out wedge-shaped bits of offcut wood. Wedges come in handy quite often

    100_6836.jpg

  4. #138
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Savannah GA USA
    Posts
    582
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The Joubert okoume is very nice. The 9mm stuff I'm using in my Sea Skiff is Joubert but the 6mm stuff in the Goat was from some other French company that I don't recall. It,, too, was very nice material.
    The "Cosmos Mariner,"My Goat Island Skiff
    http://s176.photobucket.com/albums/w168/MiddleAgesMan/

    Starting the Simmons Sea Skiff 18
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/37973275@N03/

  5. #139
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,762
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Butt strap question

    I'm about to glue the side panels together. The plans call for the but straps to be 510mm long but they have to be spaced 50mm from the sheer and chine. I presume they have to be cut smaller than 510mm long then?

  6. #140
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    948
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Oh dear...

    You POSTED in this thread!

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f169/g...estion-109367/

    Did you read the first post?


  7. #141
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,762
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by callsign222 View Post
    Oh dear...

    You POSTED in this thread!

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f169/g...estion-109367/

    Did you read the first post?

    Yes, I realised just after posting that the chinelogs 45mm overlap the edge of the ply by 10mm, so the remainder is 35mm and therefore the 510mm strap length is spot on! It just threw me when I read the instructions! No probs, it's all glued up now

  8. #142
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    55
    Posts
    8,071
    Post Thanks / Like

  9. #143
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,762
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    A dead set genius!

    Using a jigsaw I cut out all the parts that were marked out. A jigsaw makes this job a lot easier but it could be done quite easily with a hand panel saw, or my favourite, the Japanese dozuki pull saw. They are simply brilliant to use, very fast, accurate and leave a fine finish. I used this saw later to cut the Paulownia framing.

    dozuki%5B2%5D.gif

    The late 19th century NZ kauri table I saved from going down in my employerís old building that was demolished, and restored has come in handy! I believe it was used as a board room table and later lived in the lunch room. Due to itís dimensions it couldnít be removed down the stairwell so I dismantled it and brought home in the car. Arenít those legs lovely? Ha-ha, the table legs I mean! It can seat 10 comfortably or 12 with much less elbow room. But Iíve digressed, this is about building a GoatÖ.
    100_6848.jpg

    After cutting out, the parts all had to be planed down to the marked lines. A block plane was ideal.
    100_6842.jpg

    The next job was to join the side panels together using a simple butt-strap join. Again, the nice flat, long table came in handy for this job. Care is needed to prevent the epoxy joint from sliding, so small panel pins are used to hold the joint. The pins are later removed when the epoxy has cured. Do you like my hi-tech clamping device while the joint cures!
    100_6843.jpg

    The finished butt-strap join which joins the sides.
    100_6845.jpg

    The flip side of the join. Iím happy with that!
    100_6847.jpg

    Here Iíve started to build the frame around the #4 bulkhead. No screws used. Again, if you donít use screws, you need a method to stop the jointed parts from sliding all over the place. Just tap a small panel pin (depth about 3mm) into the ply or the framing timber. Then snip off the pin so that only 1mm protrudes. Then when the joint is made, it WILL not slip! This works very well on soft Paulownia, but with harder timbers youíll need to tap the joint with a mallet to bed in the pins.
    100_6853.jpg

    Iíve completed the Paulownia framing of three bulkheads. One more, plus the transom to go! Here's bulkhead number two being glued up. I won't die wondering if I used enough clamps
    100_6856.jpg

    The next task after the bulkheads will be to fix the chine logs to the sides in readiness for joining the hull parts together.

    Thatís it, itís beer oí clock, so until next time... If I donít see you through the week, Iíll see you through the winda!

  10. #144
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Portland, ME USA
    Posts
    831
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bruce, FWIW, the butt joint looks a little dry to me....I'd want to see a little more squeeze....it is hard to tell in the picture, but make sure there are not gaps in the join.

    Feels good to start, doesn't it. That is how I felt.

    --Clint

  11. #145
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,762
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Compass Project View Post
    Bruce, FWIW, the butt joint looks a little dry to me....I'd want to see a little more squeeze....it is hard to tell in the picture, but make sure there are not gaps in the join.

    Feels good to start, doesn't it. That is how I felt.

    --Clint
    Yep, trying to do a bit in the evenings as well if I can, just to keep things moving along. With a 9-5 job and the hairdressing salon to run as well, stealing some time here and there is a juggle. But it is very therapeutic and enjoyable!

    There actually was quite a bit of squeeze out from the strap side Clint. What I did was brush unthickened epoxy onto the strap and the thickened epoxy mix onto the bottom, so maybe that resulted in less bleed through at the join? Either that or the tape and plastic kept it clean and the joint was very tight. No gaps though

    What I've noticed is that the squeeze out continues for about 1/2 an hour. It's amazing. I've been cleaning up too soon, and the next time I look, the ooze is back again, so I'm going to try and leave it a while longer.

  12. #146
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Portland, ME USA
    Posts
    831
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Good job...as long as there are no gaps! I have some gaps on my bottom panel I have to fill...the danger is not having them, it is forgetting to fill them later.

    Yes, epoxy takes awhile to move out of a tight join like the butt strap joint.

    Clint

  13. #147
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,762
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Bulkheads complete

    Today I collected my carís fuel supply for the week. A local restaurant in Newcastle, Zinc, supply me with enough used cottonseed oil for about a week. Thanks guys! If youíre a local, check them out in Darby Street, you wonít be disappointed with the great food these guys turn out.

    100_6858.jpg Here is my fuel filtering station. Itís a simple setup (I like simple!) that has worked for me for the past 5 years or so. Basically, the cold, used cottonseed oil is tipped into these plastic drums in which are suspended 5micron food grade filtering bags. I have liners in them which are changed out every few weeks. What you see coming out the taps goes straight into my carís fuel tank. The car is a 1993 Mercedes 300D, a 3 litre naturally aspirated 6cyl diesel, and this particular one has been served this fuel diet for 2.5 years so far.

    This car is perhaps the greenest car in NSW, or maybe Australia?? The other cool feature Iíve installed of the car is its 2micron engine oil filter in addition to the standard oil 45micron oil filter. This 2 micron filter constantly cleans up the oil, removing the need for oil changes, and so further reducing itís impact on our environment.

    Well, thatís a little bit of a diversion to let you know something of my other passion!

    Back to the GoatÖ.

    100_6861.jpg Here I am sanding the cut-out of bulkhead #2 with a handy little drum sander attached to my cordless drill. These are cool little tools and so handy for this type of job!

    100_6882.jpgHere the holes in bulkhead #3 are being cut out. The jigsaw is a Triton, an Australian brand that recently fell on hard times and actually folded. Happily they have now made a comeback, so we can continue to enjoy using the fine tools they make. I was lucky that Santa put this in my sack last Christmas by my loving wife A cool feature of this particular saw is its scrolling control. My right hand is guiding the saw, and my left hand is controlling the scrolling knob which controls blade direction. With this precise control you can cut circles without changing the direction of the saw. The advantage of this is that the foot of the saw can be filly supported on solid material at all times.

    100_6883.jpgAll 4 bulkheads are now complete, together with side arms for #2 and #4 which donít get attached until after the hull has been assembled. This is BH3.

    Iím going to miss the old table when it has to make way for the Goat. It has been really useful as a nice big workstation.

    Iím hoping to go 3D in the next couple of weeks, after I have coated the parts with epoxy, so check back soon.

    Thanks for coming along! See you next time
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #148
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    S„o Paulo, Brazil
    Posts
    47
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    "Here I am sanding the cut-out of bulkhead #2 with a handy little drum sander attached to my cordless drill. These are cool little tools and so handy for this type of job!"

    Funny how tips like this seem to come at just the moment you need them. Drum sander for the cutouts! Of course, why didnīt I think of that?

    Love your cooking-oil driven Mercedes. Brazil is making a big noise about biodiesel at the moment but nothing so practical or sensible as what you do.

    Best

    Steve

  15. #149
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    948
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm glad I'm not the only one wearing a headlamp!

    Drum sander. Great idea. 5 months too late.

  16. #150
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    319
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default great minds

    I just bought a set of the small drum sanders for shaping the ends of the inwale spaces. Now, I can use it for something else! Thanks

Similar Threads

  1. Loking for Plywood Sheets - Hunter Valley
    By Rabbs in forum BOAT RESOURCES / PRODUCT SEARCH
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 14th Oct 2009, 05:07 PM
  2. Hunter Valley to Sydney - NOT via F3?
    By I_wanna_Shed in forum TRAVEL
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 30th Dec 2007, 02:21 PM
  3. Property Search - Hunter Valley
    By Benniee in forum FORESTRY MANAGEMENT
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 5th Aug 2007, 06:06 PM
  4. Boat Building Autumn School - Adelaide, Australia, April
    By Boatmik in forum BOAT BUILDING / REPAIRING
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29th Jan 2007, 07:30 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 28th Jan 2007, 02:11 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •