Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Age
    60
    Posts
    248

    Default GIS Holland - setup and tuning - converting a Finn sailor.

    Last week I have launched my new GIS; the third one in the Nederlands.
    Most building information will be found in my other thread "start building another Dutch GIS"
    This new thread is dedicated to sailing with this GIS, share experiences and discus things about using this great design. Most of this sailing will be single-handed.
    I have build my GIS according this design, but changed a few things
    Most of these changes will hardly have any effect on the overall sailing capacities of this GIS, but few of them could make a little difference.
    To summarize:
    1 Side "decks" are a bit wider, since I have used 28mm wide spacers. I am not shure if it is a noticable difference in comfort with the original design, but sitting on these sides is quite comfortable in my GIS.
    2 I have a "boxed in" central seat, providing extra flotation and a nice dry storage.
    I did not try capsizing yet, but I already love this dry storage nicely positioned in the center of gravity
    3 I have made drain-tubes through the stern, to get rid of water after a capsize. No capsize yet, but no issues having them eather.
    4 I also made a drain channel through the aft compartment for draining water through a plug. Works great! If you put the bow up on a trailer you can rinse the inside with a gardenhose and it all drains out through that plug.
    5 I made a stiff "plank on edge" boom to be used with a loose footed sail. First impression is that it works very well. It's easy to give this sail more depth in light weather and tightening makes it quite flat.
    6 I have made a stiffer yard and accordingly made sail. I need to compare speed with other Goat's, but it seems a quite powerfull combination. I can use lots of tension on the downhaul, without flattening this sail too much. The downside could be that I need to reef earlier (?) and I miss flexibillity in gusts(?) but after the first few tests it feels quite well.
    7 I made an extra bow-stringer and put some extra glass and aluminium strips around the bottum area to have more resistance against wear on concrete ramps. I already love this! It makes single-handed life so much easier if you can just sail your boat quietly on the ramp, step out and get your trailer.
    8 All of this in 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 has a weight penalty! My GIS will certainly NOT be the lightest GIS around. For me that's not a problem, since I will not carry that extra 60kgplus person anyway

    I did lot's of dinghy sailing in the past, and raced a Finn-dinghy for several years at clublevel. The reason I build my GIS is, that I would like to have a " Finn-like" performance ( not only speed, but also a good sailer that goes everywere in experienced hands ) with much better cruising options ( more internal space, comfort, easier rigging and can be rowed or even motored ).
    After a few sailing days it seems GIS has already matched (high) expectations

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Age
    60
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Yesterday I have sailed GIS with Bf3-5 on a bigger stretch of water. Parts were sheltered, but on the main river ( about 1.5 mile wide ) there were bigger waves also due to frequent passing cargo-ships.

    Hoisting my main with the bow fixed with a rope ashore I had my first "almost capsize" experience
    I was stuck behind the mast, between the boom ( that came over in a wind-shift ) and my centerboard ( that was still half up ) ..............after taking 25 liters on board ( and that strong feeling......####, there we go ) the wind shifted back and I was saved .
    Lesson 1 learned; lower your centerboard and be aware that GIS is not very stable if you have your bodyweight forward to the bow.

    Lesson 2: always have that bucket with you!

    The wind was quite gusty, but GIS sails very balanced and most gusts can be handled by letting your main go and/or some luffing. It's nice that GIS can handle greater angles of heel and keeps balance so well. It gives you more time to react on things. But you really need to have the main in your hand to be able to react in time! I bought a ratched block and that works very well.

    Tacking against waves under Bf 4 (11.16 knots) gusts goes really well. It's nice to keep an angle of heel, than she keeps speed very well and hardly stops against any wave. Even when the wind started to increase (5Bf - 17-21 knots) I was able to keep her running under full sail, but you really need to be careful and the top-part of the sail does not really catch wind anymore in a gust. I was surprized that she was still very well balanced under these "survival" circumstances. Especially when I raised my centerboard with 10-15cm it became easier.
    After that I have put a first reef ( probably needed in high 4Bf if you are single handed ? )and it became much easier to keep her running against the wind without loosing any speed. o

    Lessons learned tacking: She survives very well under full ( to much ) sail, but early reefing makes much more sense. Keep and angle of heel against waves. Raise your centerboard a bit under rough conditions.

    Running with the wind is just FUN . Sailing as simple as it should be..........the more wind, the more speed you have. Fully balanced, full control and full speed! No nose-diving ( different from a Finn ) But I really needed to raise my centerboard with around 30-40 cm.
    Lessons learned running: raise your centerboard and just GO! If conditions are rough; use a stopper-knot in your main to prevent your boom to go forward and keep on steering!! If you have the right "dinghy feeling" it seems there is no limit running a GIS !

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,764

    Default

    Damn, you didn't capsize! We are all waiting with baited breath to find out how your drain tubes work!!!

    The drain channels through the plugs in the stern are a great idea and I wish I had put these in. Much easier than removing water with a bucket and sponge.

    The wider spacers will help prevent breaking thumbs, so I have no issue with that either!

    Stiff yard and stiff boom..., YES, good for a nice setting lug rig. The yard will twist off in the gusts anyway, and you can easily add more tension to the sail if you need to flatten the sail some more.

    Your description of the sailing characteristics of the GIS are very accurate. In particular I have also been surprised at how well it handles quite big waves. For a light boat, there is very little resistance when the bow gets buried in a wave. Off the wind she is a delight to sail, and fairly scoots off.

    You are right too about the centreboard. When you have good speed to windward, raising the board a bit helps to keep the boat flatter and it still provides plenty of lift. Mik's foil design is very good and it's well worth the effort to get it right.

    The Goat provides a lot of simple sailing fun with good performance, without the complication that comes with a lot of other boats.

    It's great to hear that you're having so much fun with yours. I don't think it's possible not to have fun in a GIS, but please, we need a capsize report

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    58
    Posts
    8,100

    Default

    The Goat provides a lot of simple sailing fun with good performance, without the complication that comes with a lot of other boats.

    It's great to hear that you're having so much fun with yours. I don't think it's possible not to have fun in a GIS, but please, we need a capsize report
    Before the water gets cold!

    Capsize in a safe place the first time. A bit of wind helps balance the boat while you get aboard again.

    Very interested to hear how the mods work.

    MIK

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    58
    Posts
    8,100

    Default

    I have just relabelled this thread.

    I wish we had all the performance and tuning stuff in one place with all the contributions from Joost, watermaat, Christophe, Clint, Brian Pearson, Bruce, Peter, David, Peter, John, Ian and many more.

    If someone had a large bit of time it might be interesting to compile all we have learned - it would be quite some document in terms of solid information. I could set up a WIKI for people to cut and paste into on my site if anyone, or several, are interested in sorting through all the stuff.

    it could be broken into different subjects. If anyone wants to give it a shot I can put the WIKI up.

    MIK

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Queenstown New Zealand
    Posts
    382

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatmik View Post
    I wish we had all the performance and tuning stuff in one place with all the contributions from Joost, watermaat, Christophe, Clint, Brian Pearson, Bruce, Peter, David, Peter, John, Ian and many more.

    If someone had a large bit of time it might be interesting to compile all we have learned - it would be quite some document in terms of solid information. I could set up a WIKI for people to cut and paste into on my site if anyone, or several, are interested in sorting through all the stuff.

    it could be broken into different subjects. If anyone wants to give it a shot I can put the WIKI up.

    MIK
    Yes, have thought the same - what an extraordinary amount of information there is in this forum, but often all over the place. It would be great if you could set up a wiki with some subject titles to break it into manageable bits and between us we can start pasting it across and tidying it up.

    Ian

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    58
    Posts
    8,100

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    58
    Posts
    8,100

    Default

    I have opened a new thread on making a WIKI - or ersatz WIKI in this case.

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f169/d...oils-c-124158/

    Help please!!!

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Age
    60
    Posts
    248

    Default Rigging details

    I have used a few tricks to make rigging as simple as possible.

    Around the mast on deck I have drilled four 8mm holes, rounded them with a router and epoxied them carefully ( I did it already during building )
    With 4mm dynema loops and stopperknots you have very simple removable fastenings for everything you need. No screws, flat surface after removal.
    Attachment 148308

    I have used the same "trick" to fix mooring-lines on the three corners of the boat. 12mm holes, rounded with a router and you can fix any line using a stopper-knot.
    Attachment 148309
    Attachment 148310
    Attachment 148311

    I have also used holes to fix the traveller. This traveller is fixed through a spacer-block. I have placed it a bit more aft, to be able to sit on the aft-deck in front of this traveller ( tip from Joost ) .
    Attachment 148312
    Attachment 148313

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Age
    60
    Posts
    248

    Default My blog about sailing my GIS

    FYI
    I am making a Blog now about sailing with my new GIS. I will try to regular update with experiences and tips&tricks.

    Sailing a Dutch Goat Island Skiff

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Age
    60
    Posts
    248

    Default Making non-slip on a my GIS

    Last week I made non-slip area's on the bottum. Especially under rough circumstances and when you are roll-tacking GIS can have a great angle of heeling. These non-slip area's make it much more comfortable.

    I have used a very simple and inexpensive way, using fine sand and varnish. I have used so called "birds sand" or "shelf sand" in my area. I have also used a fine sieve to keep small stones out.

    Step 1 Sanding the panels and masking the area's that you do not want to have non-slip on.
    Attachment 148314
    Attachment 148315

    Step 2 Varnishing and let that cure for about 20 minutes to have it smooth.
    Attachment 148316

    Step 3 Poor sand on, use plenty of it. I needed 1.5 kg for both panels.
    Attachment 148317
    Attachment 148318

    Step 4 After about 5-7 hours ( if the varnish is not sticky anymore ) I have turned the hull to get rid of the excess of sand. Don't toutch the surface, just let gravity do the job.
    You can also remove the masking tape at this stage.
    Attachment 148319

    Step 5 after the varnished has fully cured ( 24 hours or more ) you can remove loose sand and small stones with a hard brush and vacuum the inside.

    Step 6 Put another coat of varnish to fix the sand. This sand will soak up plenty of varnish, I used some extra thinner in my varnish to let it flow better.
    Curing could take much longer, due to the thick coat. It took 48 hours before it was hard enough to be used carefully.
    Attachment 148320
    Attachment 148321

    This gives a semi-transparent pretty sharp non-slip surface that is very durable ( sillicon is very hard ) . If it appears to be too sharp ( it's like sanding-paper ) you could put another coat of varnish to smoothen it a bit.

    I have used this technique in the past with wooden dinghy racing and I still think it's one of the better ways of making non-slip surfaces. It's very inexpensive and you can make all kinds of patterns that you like.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    766

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Watermaat View Post
    Around the mast on deck I have drilled four 8mm holes, rounded them with a router and epoxied them carefully ( I did it already during building )
    With 4mm dynema loops and stopperknots you have very simple removable fastenings for everything you need. No screws, flat surface after removal.
    VERY sexy. SO appropriate for the Goat and its simple-is-better ethic.
    Dave
    StorerBoat Builder, Sailor, Enthusiast
    Dave's GIS Chronicles | Dave's Lugs'l Chronicles | Dave's StorerBoat Forum Thread

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Savannah GA USA
    Posts
    583

    Default

    I chose MIK's preferred sugar method. Application was just like yours but the sugar is washed away which follows MIK's #1 rule--add nothing that adds weight!

    You don't get the sharp feel of sand but you do get a nicely textured surface that is almost as clear as gloss varnish.
    The "Cosmos Mariner,"My Goat Island Skiff
    http://s176.photobucket.com/albums/w168/MiddleAgesMan/

    Starting the Simmons Sea Skiff 18
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/37973275@N03/

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Age
    60
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MiddleAgesMan View Post
    I chose MIK's preferred sugar method. Application was just like yours but the sugar is washed away which follows MIK's #1 rule--add nothing that adds weight!

    You don't get the sharp feel of sand but you do get a nicely textured surface that is almost as clear as gloss varnish.
    I never tried that system so I wanted to stick with my own experience using sand.
    regarding weight; I did use 1.5 kg of sand to poor on, but after removing the excess there is just a very fine coat of sand left, weight probably less than 250gr.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    58
    Posts
    8,100

    Default

    The sand can be very abrasive if it is too coarse - the fine sand here is OK.

    The sugar method is really neat - same trick as the sand - but use a larger grained sugar. Next day wash off the sugar.

    It is a pretty nice method.

    But those "built in" rope loops are just brilliant. Put the goat up on its transom and it would feel like you were mountaineering.

    MIK

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Trailer sailor
    By woodeneye in forum Michael Storer Wooden Boat Plans
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 26th Nov 2009, 01:44 AM
  2. Lone Sailor
    By wheelinround in forum NOTHING AT ALL TO DO WITH WOODWORK
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24th Nov 2009, 09:59 PM
  3. Seventeen Pens Going to Holland
    By Barry_White in forum WOODTURNING - PEN TURNING
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 9th Jan 2007, 07:22 AM
  4. Holland Blind kits?
    By craigb in forum PAINTING, PLASTERING, TILING, DECORATING, etc.
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10th Aug 2005, 01:45 PM
  5. Old Sailor
    By Mick4412 in forum WOODIES JOKES
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 27th Dec 2002, 09:13 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •