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  1. #61
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    You can view one pic at a time by clicking on the next pic (on the right side of the screen) but I think using the pause button on the slide show so you can read the comments works better (my opinion - your mileage may vary).

    Either way, Mik does offer great pics of wherever he is...

    Bob

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  3. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddles View Post
    Keep them coming please Mik. You have a gift for chosing photos that create a real sense of the place that I'm finding beguiling.

    Richard
    Quite agree they are fantastic photos, the artists touch I think.

  4. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddles View Post
    d
    why can't everywhere be exactly the same on this darned internet thingamajig

    As explained to me by one of the original rocket scientists at Internode:
    "The wonderful thing about standards is that there are sooo many to choose from."

    Have a nice day !!
    AJ

  5. #64
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    USA Day 3 - Missed Appointment, Walk, Asian Museum (and a couple of little boats) and meeting some fans

    Full set here http://www.flickr.com/photos/boatmik...7622239306425/

    I was supposed to meet David Luckhardt to go to the River Heritage Fair. I blew it - I woke up when I was supposed to be at the station. Not just my station, but the one over the other side of the river - eeeeeeek!

    So a phonecall including abject apologies and then I had to plan the day.

    Breakfast at hotel ... then I decided to go to the San Francisco Asian Art Museum. So walking walking again. Got a Lemon Green Tea with Tapioca Pearls so had to walk through chinatown to get it ... of course



    Even the cardboard recycling trucks are cute.



    I had chosen a route that went over the tallest part of the city ... sigh (puff puff). But still good things to see. A trolley car is pulled by a cable under the road. I don't understand why it doesn't have a problem with friction.



    There are some strange entries to houses. What do they do if it rains?



    What do you think this church is made of (it is the first Baptist Church built in S.F.) Talked to a nice woman on the corner.



    It is wood .. being repaired.



    This one is just down the road from Little Saigon where I had lunch and met my fans.



    In the museum, Buddhas hands.



    "come on sweetie, Look at me ... I didn't mean it"



    Need some boats, yes? Small details from some Japanese woodblock prints



    And finally a clip .. I don't know if it will embed.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/boatmik...7622239306425/

    Oh and the fans???? They were in the Vietnamese Restaurant I had lunch at - the Tamerind.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/boatmik...7622239306425/

  6. #65
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    Fantastic Mik now I can say I know a pox star.

  7. #66
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  8. #67
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    Howdy, All travelling pics really from yesterday and just a few from making some samples for the talk I give on Wednesday. Most of the day around the house.

    Pics are here - http://www.flickr.com/photos/boatmik...7622374607302/

    But the travel pics look a bit boring in retrospect, but that doesn't mean the view was at all boring.

    The big thing was waking up while it was still dark to see the silhouettes of big conifers - maybe douglas fir and also the quite sudden variation in trees from one area to another. I don't think it is all because they were chopped down!



    I am really glad I travelled by train rather than flying - even though I am pretty tired again. Gave me a strong feeling for how small and how far flung some of the towns are.

    There were plenty of farms with a paddock full of defunct cars from the Model T right through to Studebakers from the 70s. What do you do with an old car in a country town?

    Also the size and speed of the rivers is boggling - considering we were well inland. These huge rivers were not messing around but flowing fast.



    The AMTRAK system still has dining cars, but not quite the high class dining experience I was imagining, though the lunch was both acceptably cheap and tasty enough (And there was a vego option). But was fun sitting with two other people I have never met and having a bit of conversation.



    One was coming back from dropping her husband and son on a week long cycling expedition. She followed them last year, but this year she decided to catch the train home and she will catch it back down to pick them up again. I think she was having quite a nice time doing what she wanted.

    The elderly man at the table wanted to cut straight to the dessert menu, but the waiter told him firmly that he had to order a main first. He grumbled cheerfully about it for the next 10 mins. He was great as he had lived in the area we were passing through and he knew the names of the towns etc.

    As we sat there we listened to the other conversations and found that the train was getting bigger by the moment.

    I knew it had a cafe car and a dining car, but soon we added a cinema car, a parlour and an observation car. I wondered aloud if they had an aquarium too.

    My lunch companions smiled politely. My instinct for the right tip is starting to match up with other people which is good. I was working out how much those waiters made it tips .... the jobs on the railway must be quite sought after. Lets see ... chairs for 40 (but only half full) but about 5 seatings and average tip of around $2 to $3. The bottom end of this would work out about $200 per meal. Not bad at all.

    The staff are quite firm in dealing with the customers too - it would be considered quite rude by OZ standards, but here it has the right context and balance. I have found myself ignored a number of times because I have not been noisy or quick enough to catch a waiter ... they are not really ignoring me ... more that they really don't see my mouselike behaviour.

    Anyway ... I won't put many pics up on this forum today as I think they are a bit duller in some ways ... but I like them - photography was really difficult, but there was a strong feeling the way to represent the landscape in art was to knit it in wool.

    I often have the same feeling travelling around OZ, so might be fetishistic thinking .. or maybe it is true too.

    Finally got to the very elegant Portland Railway station that my friend David says is one of his favourite buildings in Portland.



    This is David at home with the First Storer Boat built in the USA about 7 years ago (he can't decide just how long!)



    We also went to his workshop. Couple of lath and lashed kayak frames.



    And today we started making some samples for people in the classes to break. Possibly some of the worst filleting I have done in my life.



    MIK

  9. #68
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    Let me guess, all silica mixed in humid conditions . . . were there any little puff balls inside the fillets?

  10. #69
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    Silica and humid conditions, no puff balls I have noticed - it was small batches mixed throughly. I haven't used pure silica since about 1982.

    Is there a workaround?

  11. #70
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    Yep, don't use straight silica. The most I'll ever use is 50% by volume with something else.

  12. #71
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    I always go 50/50 with something too. HEY, we do these exercises with kids. They love breaking them. Makes a great discussion about glueing technique and the detaield nature of it. I also have them leave squeeze out uncleaned up and ask them to remove the mess...they realize quickly that it is easier done when the glue is wet. Another thing, is to do some "t-squares" as we call them without wetting out end grain and see what result that gives. I've had a kid do it with 5200 when there was a few days to cure and they see how bulletproof that stuff is for construction as well as sealing components...forever. Sometimes I have mixed the types of timber pieces we've used so they see how the doug fir breaks in comparison to the mahogany, etc.

    Lets do this when you are here. Have fun.

    Clint

  13. #72
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    I see Mik chose to showcase the view of Sisu that put front-and-center the marvelous, unique, mahogany combination Breasthook, Bowsprit, and Flagstaff Socket. That's his favorite bit. I think he may be planning to revise the plans in order to incorporate it. Right Mik?
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/

  14. #73
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    Howdy,



    The full set is here http://www.flickr.com/photos/boatmik...7622383846430/

    Well more interesting things to report. Actually so interesting I have gone out to buy an MP3 voice recorder so I won't miss these conversations.

    This was the view out of the window on waking. I couldn't get the colours right even with fiddling - much lighter and clearer than here.

    j

    Continued next post.

  15. #74
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    On the way out I saw how they tie the ships up to the edge of the river



    Met a number of interesting people today. Went to meet David's friend Lon Wells. He is one of the sailing brotherhood that call themselves "the old coots". They are the ones organising the Timothy Lake sailing on the weekend up in the mountains.



    One of his tenants who lives in a little house on the land though that my accent would catch all the girls easily ... I said I had not tried so far.

    Another of the tenants lived in this



    Anyway .. Lon is also a history buff. He owns a plot of historical backwater where he has a long wharf cluttered with historical boats or just interesting boats.



    He worked on the FFG frigate project when it built some warships for Australia. He provided the trivia that the beer lockers on the Australian ships were 3 times bigger than on the same ships being built for America.

    But Lon has a vision for this area - it used to be a backwater where salmon fishing boats were moored - mostly Gillnetters. In the early days gillnetters were VERY elegant


    this is not my photo.

    Lon is collecting a bunch of interesting boats to use as a livery (hire) fleet. Mostly canoes and small dinghies.

    A big sailed sailing dinghy



    This amazing old aluminium dinghy - rivetted construction, ply deck and seats and some sense of elegance



    Including a canvas canoe (first one I have ever seen in the flesh). It was in Lon's shed





    I would estimate the weight as about 70 to 80lbs.

    A dinghy with a heart shaped transom



    Lon knows lots of interesting people. Also dropping in on this day were Irene Martin and her husband. They work fishing for salmon in this river (the Columbia River). Irene is also a writer (Lon got his copy signed)



    We talked for some time. I have just bought a cheap mp3 recorder so I can catch these conversations a bit better.



    She said there was a significant struggle between the Chinook Indians and the fishermen working together against the electric companies who don't want to make any allowance for Salmon fishing. The river has a number of dams like the one I took pics of a couple of days ago - short drop dams for generating power. The salmon need access to the upper river to spawn and the electricity companies don't really care.

    Also Irene told us that the fisheries were mostly small two person boats. One boat can make enough for a family to survive. Bigger boats dont work because by the time the profit is split between 6 people it is not enough for anyone.

    The fishery is doing a lot of experimentation to find out ways of making sure immature fish can escape the nets without damage and are doing a lot of research in this area.

    Lon and Irene suggested that I have a look at the Maritime Museum in Astoria (named after the Astor family who made their money out of the fur trade). So we have organised to go on Tuesday next week. Lon said he had to do a trip specially anyhow and would do some phonecalls to see if we could get access to the storage warehouses where the bulk of the boats and other bits are stored.

    So next Tuesday's pics will be pretty exciting.

    In the afternoon David and I grabbed some pizza and a drink ($3.50 deal) and then went to get bits ready for my talk.

    Good thing is my hay fever is getting better - I might have a voice tomorrow night!!!

    MIK

  16. #75
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    Fascinating stuff, Mik. Great pictures and excellent commentary.

    Wish I was heading up there tomorrow instead of Thursday!

    Bob

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