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Thread: Texas GIS

  1. #136
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    This was just an experiment using the oven paper on a flat surface. The other sides of the rudder head and centercase will be done using the 3 thin coats method that Mik suggests.

    I have used it some on the foils and it seems to work best when there is some fiberglass involved.

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  3. #137
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    Hello All,

    I am not sure under which thread to post this, but it seems to belong here:

    Duckworks - One True Thing - Preparing For the Texas 200 - A Survival Guide - Part One

    Interesting good article about the Texas 200: handy but sturdy boat with shallow draft and easy reefing with multiple reef ponts are considered key things for the boat and rig.

    Participants seem to agree however that attitude is the determining factor whether one finshes this 200 mile endurance event under the blasting Texas sun, choppy waves and 25 knots winds succesfully.

    The more I read about this event, the more I want to participate one day in it!

    Best regards,

    Joost
    Last edited by Joost; 27th Feb 2010 at 08:51 AM. Reason: spelling errors

  4. #138
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    The marine plywood most of us can get here in Texas is french made. It is interesting that the 2 outside surfaces are not the same. Not that the quality is different, the color of the wood is slightly different. My centerboard kit case was made with the same side of the plywood facing up. That means the same side of the plywood has a surface facing the interior of the case and one facing the exterior of the case. Confused yet?

    There is a very slight difference in the color of the outside veneers on a sheet of plywood. One side is darker than the other. I don't know why, but my kids can pick up on the color difference before and after the epoxy is put on. I can easily see it too, at the age of 50. My kids noticed this first. Even with the same prep work, the wood veneer color ended up slightly different. After the epoxy it is easier to see. Who cares if the port side of the case is slightly darker than the starboard side?

    OK, most folks don't care or can't see the difference, but in my profession it is part of my job, so I am critical of these things. But I have to remember, I am building a boat not a piece of furniture.

    Tonight's job is sanding the tips of the foils to get them ready for glassing the body of the foils. The kids and I will butt joint the sides and bottom next and continue with the foils.

    There is no pressure on me to make these foils perfect. My best friend, best man at my wedding and godfather of my first son designs composite wind turbine blades for a living. I don't think he will notice if the foils are not perfect.

  5. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joost View Post
    Hello All,

    I am not sure under which thread to post this, but it seems to belong here:

    Duckworks - One True Thing - Preparing For the Texas 200 - A Survival Guide - Part One

    Interesting good article about the Texas 200: handy but sturdy boat with shallow draft and easy reefing with multiple reef points are considered key things for the boat and rig.

    Participants seem to agree however that attitude is the determining factor whether one finishes this 200 mile endurance event under the blasting Texas sun, choppy waves and 25 knots winds successfully.

    The more I read about this event, the more I want to participate one day in it! Joost
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I will let you stay at my house if you ever want to come over for this event!

    The Texas 200 is the event that propelled me into action. I have read about the Three Peaks Race and it inspires me too. Three Peaks Race
    The Texas 200 is just a little closer. I am getting a lot of grief from the Texas 200 veterans about dagger-boards vs lee boards. Something about hitting oyster reefs at speed and doing pirouettes as the dagger board grinds to a halt on a reef that has some folks very entertained. They just can't wait for me to entertain them.

    I really believe that attitude is the only reason some folks can do extraordinary things. Read this book: Browsing Store - DEEP SURVIVAL paperback
    It will confirm some of the Duckworks article.

    Of course, I am also the the dad that let's his kid study in the dryer.IMG_2370.jpg

  6. #140
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    OK, most folks don't care or can't see the difference,
    John,

    People may care but no one, not even you, will see the difference on the center case...

    Where the color difference could be noticeable is in the sides and bottom if the panels were not matched side for side. It is possible to get different colors side by side at the butt joins. Paint will eliminate the two-tone effect if it is that bothersome.

    All six sheets of ply I purchased had a light side and a slightly darker side and, yes, the difference is enhanced with the epoxy.
    Building Gardens of Fenwick, a Welsford Parthfinder
    Gardens of Fenwick
    Karen Ann, a Storer GIS
    Goat Island Skiff - Sacramento

  7. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by john goodman View Post
    The marine plywood most of us can get here in Texas is french made. It is interesting that the 2 outside surfaces are not the same. Not that the quality is different, the color of the wood is slightly different. My centerboard kit case was made with the same side of the plywood facing up. That means the same side of the plywood has a surface facing the interior of the case and one facing the exterior of the case. Confused yet?

    There is a very slight difference in the color of the outside veneers on a sheet of plywood. One side is darker than the other. I don't know why, but my kids can pick up on the color difference before and after the epoxy is put on. I can easily see it too, at the age of 50. My kids noticed this first. Even with the same prep work, the wood veneer color ended up slightly different. After the epoxy it is easier to see. Who cares if the port side of the case is slightly darker than the starboard side?

    OK, most folks don't care or can't see the difference, but in my profession it is part of my job, so I am critical of these things. But I have to remember, I am building a boat not a piece of furniture.
    Hi John, If you turn any piece of wood over it's different on the other side That's the beauty of wood, it varies, unlike plastic or metal. As for the oven paper, you need to apply a good degree of pressure to the squeegee, or you could get an uneven surface. I used one with a stiff, hard rubber edge, after a plastic scraper to even out the epoxy layer. However, I've changed my mind about doing the whole hull with this method and will just use the roller. It's OK for smallish flat surfaces like the dagger board case and rudder casings though.

  8. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiddleAgesMan View Post
    MIK's method of giving a dimension to represent a bevel instead of an angle works very well, especially if you're planing or sanding the bevels instead of cutting them on a table saw. I had thought I would have preferred working with angles, say 10 degrees, but, after doing it MIK's I'd say his method is easier unless the part is a square or a rectangle...not many of those in a Goat!

    It's pretty simple, actually: Assume the instructions say to bevel by 3mm. Draw a line on the side where wood is to be removed 3mm in from the square edge. Plane or sand to that line, leaving the opposite edge untouched.
    It's a good point you made there John. For the sides of the frames, the plans look to me to show that we bevel the frame cleats, not the ply, which I presume stays a square 90deg edge? It doesn't quite make sense as that would leave a gap between the bulkhead ply edge and the side. I blew up the plans to see if it became any clearer to me but I still can't be sure.

    Edit: I'm going to take a stab at answering my own question. I've thought about this and convinced myself that Mick would have mentioned if it was just the cleat that was bevelled. So the bevel should be across the ply as well, so making a straight line from outside edge to inside edge so that both ply and cleat are bevelled. Am I right?
    Last edited by woodeneye; 27th Feb 2010 at 05:54 PM. Reason: Penny dropped

  9. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodeneye View Post
    So the bevel should be across the ply as well, so making a straight line from outside edge to inside edge so that both ply and cleat are bevelled. Am I right?
    I have not found a thread that helps with an answer. Is there another thread about this?

    The kids and the kat glassed the foils today. The foil rack made it easy for the kids to work. Great invention! I have included a close up of the top tip of the daggerboard. My kids did a good job.

    We will do a fill coat in a few hours when the epoxy gets tacky.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #144
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    I also noticed that one side of the Okume is consistently darker. It's not a random variation either. One side is more golden and the other is more gray. Wonder why that is.

    Anyway, I picked my ply pieces so that the same color was on the inside of the hull sides. But after I cut the 4 hull sides I noticed the note on the drawing showing that port hull side is laid out "inside face up" and starboard "outside face up" . This means if you cut your hull sides as laid out on the plans you are guaranteed to have one darker than the other.

    I'm almost over it but if the ply store was closer than the 300 miles I had to drive I would have scrapped the two pieces and started over.
    Simon
    My building and messing about blog:
    http://planingaround.blogspot.com/
    The folks I sail with:
    West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron

  11. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodeneye View Post
    Edit: I'm going to take a stab at answering my own question. I've thought about this and convinced myself that Mick would have mentioned if it was just the cleat that was bevelled. So the bevel should be across the ply as well, so making a straight line from outside edge to inside edge so that both ply and cleat are bevelled. Am I right?
    I didn't mention it because nothing needs to be done at this stage. You have saved yourself a bit of planing later on though - so no harm at all.

    MIK

  12. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonLew View Post
    I also noticed that one side of the Okume is consistently darker. It's not a random variation either. One side is more golden and the other is more gray. Wonder why that is.

    Anyway, I picked my ply pieces so that the same color was on the inside of the hull sides. But after I cut the 4 hull sides I noticed the note on the drawing showing that port hull side is laid out "inside face up" and starboard "outside face up" . This means if you cut your hull sides as laid out on the plans you are guaranteed to have one darker than the other.

    I'm almost over it but if the ply store was closer than the 300 miles I had to drive I would have scrapped the two pieces and started over.
    Everyone will say how dever of you to put light coloured ply on the inside compared to the outside. And never notice it is around the other way when they are on the other side.

    Best wishes
    Michael

  13. #147
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    John if you haven't glued chine logs down yet, put a bevel on the top edge so that the c'logs have a flat on the top parallel to top of bulkheads so gunk doesn't accumulate there. It makes cutting notches ever so slightly more difficult. If you didn't don't worry. Just a tip.

    --Clint

  14. #148
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    Clint - that's a great tip. I'm just about to glue the chine logs on.

    MIK - Yeah, I know most people will not notice it. What annoys me is the fact that I spent the effort to pick the ply sheets to match and then did not check, just ASSumed that the hull sides are laid out mirror image of each other.
    Simon
    My building and messing about blog:
    http://planingaround.blogspot.com/
    The folks I sail with:
    West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron

  15. #149
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    Hi Simon,

    We all do it once and then commit it to memory to check every time.

    Several years later we forget and do it again.

    MIK

  16. #150
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    Oh - actually Simon - it's not your fault at all. Because the side panels are not reflections drawn on the ply but drawn rotated it is unavoidable to have them from different sides of the ply when the boat is assembled.

    MIK

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