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  1. #16
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    Sep 2008
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    Pontus, I got my wood ("furu", not plywood) from the local building supply store, Beijer. Bauhaus has similar wood but in shorter lengths. Beijer has it up to 5M long and with very few and small knots. Really nice. You can choose whether to buy it cut and planed to approximate sizes or buy a say 18mm plank and rip it to size with a table saw (Chinese at Bauhaus for about 1600 SEK) or circular saw with guide. I use "trallskruvar" to hold pieces together while the epoxy hardens. To save weight you can remove them and fill the holes. I kept them only on the gunwale as I used 20x20mm oak for that and I wasn't sure how well the epoxy would stick to that. But so far no detachments.
    Peter

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  3. #17
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    Sep 2011
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    Bought fir and a table saw today. Will buy some WRC during the week. It took me some time to get that 18mm thick WRC is "19mm to within a milimeter", that will save me some time and money. Me and my son spent a couple of hours in the garage, mostly assembling the table saw, but we also used the saw so make a fairing batten, put nails where we had previously marked the plywood, attached the fairing batten, moved one misplaced nail and draw some lines. So now the first panel is marked. My wife is working tomorrow, so we might find some time tomorrow to make the first cuts of the plywood.
    Last edited by scooterpontus; 5th Dec 2011 at 04:20 AM. Reason: New link to the picture

  4. #18
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    Sep 2011
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    Gothenburg, Sweden
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    Today, I bought the epoxy and related stuff. Fantastic customer service, a producer selling to private customers and additionally stocking stuff like scales and other useful stuff just to make my life easier is not common. If you live in my part of the world I would strongly recommend NM epoxy.

  5. #19
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    Jun 2009
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    Sydney, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooterpontus View Post
    The boat will fit in the garage, but it won't be much space left. (Are you supposed to check things like that before you decide on building a boat in your garage?)

    Pontus
    I did the EXACT same thing with my Eureka canoe, I'm talking my dad around letting me use up MORE garage space to build another boat... lets just say he isnt happy...
    Once you build one, you will want to build more... just like tattoos...
    Welcome to an obsession!

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    "Old" Hampshire, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooterpontus View Post
    St
    The boat will fit in the garage, but it won't be much space left. (Are you supposed to check things like that before you decide on building a boat in your garage?)
    Yes, that sounds familiar to me also, looks like I'm going to have to buy an all-over outside cover or persuade my employer to let me use a bit of spare warehouse space )

  7. #21
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    Sep 2011
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    Gothenburg, Sweden
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    The plans call for 19x45 wrc for stuff like chinelogs and frames. I can get 18x89mm and if I rip it in two I will get 18x43. It should be alright don't you think?
    For those interested I, as everyone else building just about anything, have a blog. You'll find it at goatislandskiffingothenburg.blogspot.com

    Pontus

  8. #22
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    Apr 2008
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    You should be fine.

    Somewhere in the plans, MIK says the dimensions should be accurate to within 1mm or so. I certainly relied on having that leeway during my build. I was frequently re-cutting lumber originally measured in inches, no mm, so I just did my best.

    WRC (or equivalent) pieces are mostly there to provide a wider surface to hold glue, not to provide a lot of strength. Even where it matters (such as side pieces on frames which extend up to the sheer) you should have more than enough strength.

    Just be careful to take the smaller size into account when cutting notches in the bulkheads. That is to say, since the chine log must still extend 10mm below the bottom of the side panel, it will only extend 33mm, not 35mm up the side. The matching notch in the bulkheads will need to be a little shorter and narrower than in the drawing.

  9. #23
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    Apr 2008
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    Now that I think about it, you should also cut those side pieces going up to the sheer a few mm long as well, since they'll start a little lower.

  10. #24
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    Sep 2011
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    Thanks Paulie, a good catch on the lengths of the side pieces, I'll make a note on that so that I (with luck) remember it when the time comes to cut them.
    Pontus

  11. #25
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    Jul 2005
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    Howdy,

    The thicknesses only need to be within a millimetre ... for the sides that glue to the plywood there is no requirement except a visual one .. so variation is not a problem.

    For a structural join the gluing surface needs to be three times the plywood thickness. So for a Goat the framing needs to have a glue surface that is around 18mm for the 6mm plywood.

    So you could almost build a goat out of 19 square. However, once you need to do bevels then you need something deeper. So 45 is simply the most economic next size.

    You could use 19 x 28 for example, but it might not look right and also is an extra saw cut .. so it would make buying the timber more expensive.

    I think there is something a little bit ecological going on in my head too .. to use as much of the raw timber as possible. Worldwide most timber that is kiln dried is 50mm thick rough sawn .. so you can see that around 19 square and around 19 x 45 are the most economical sizes.

    Best wishes
    Michael

  12. #26
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    Sep 2011
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    Thanks Mik!
    I'll be buying the WRC tomorrow then. Did the first gluing yesterday, and I think I did OK. The epoxy was a bit slow to set due (I think) to the garage being a bit cold, but I found a thermostat on the radiator that was set on "1" and changed it to the "5" setting so the garage should be warmer and the epoxy set by now. I'm having a great time boat building so far, tools, wood, and in the end there will be a boat!

    Pontus

  13. #27
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    Hi Pontus,

    Sounds great

    As you know ... epoxy is an allergen. It is not particularly toxic unless you drink it.

    Allergen means some people will be affected - in the same way I am affected by horse hair ... my eyes go red, I have trouble breathing etc.

    It is rare for people to get epoxy allergy ... just like people who are allergic to horses or peanuts.

    However I have noticed that people working in closed spaces tend to become allergic a little bit more frequently.

    I have been thinking about this. I would probably suggest ...

    1/ Use the dry test assembly idea to get as many parts assembled with screws and clamps as possible.

    2/ Do all the gluing in the last part of your work period.

    3/ Keep the area not to hot and not too cold and as well ventilated while you are working in there. When you start epoxying put the temperature up to 5 and then walk out of the room when the epoxying is done.

    I think it is only a very slight extra risk, but it can be quite serious and scary if it happens. And inconvenient.

    For those not building in cold winter environments, the same ideas can be useful, but the very best thing is ventilation of the workplace. A gentle breeze is enough.

    Best wishes for your build. Very exciting to have a second goat in Sweden.

    Michael

  14. #28
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    Hi Pontus,

    Sounds great

    As you know ... epoxy is an allergen. It is not particularly toxic unless you drink it.

    Allergen means some people will be affected - in the same way I am affected by horse hair ... my eyes go red, I have trouble breathing etc.

    It is rare for people to get epoxy allergy ... just like people who are allergic to horses or peanuts.

    However I have noticed that people working in closed spaces tend to become allergic a little bit more frequently.

    I have been thinking about this. I would probably suggest ...

    1/ Use the dry test assembly idea to get as many parts assembled with screws and clamps as possible.

    2/ Do all the gluing in the last part of your work period.

    3/ Keep the area not to hot and not too cold and as well ventilated while you are working in there. When you start epoxying put the temperature up to 5 and then walk out of the room when the epoxying is done.

    CORRECTION AND ELABORATION FOR COATING AND GLASSING.

    The temperature needs to be stable or falling for these processes ... if the temperature is rising the air in the timber will expand and create hundreds of little bubbles on the surface. This is not a problem with gluing. But for coating and glassing which seal off lots of surface .... the bubbles are a risk.

    I think it is only a very slight extra risk, but it can be quite serious and scary if it happens. And inconvenient.

    For those not building in cold winter environments, the same ideas can be useful, but the very best thing is ventilation of the workplace. A gentle breeze is enough.

    Best wishes for your build. Very exciting to have a second goat in Sweden.

    Michael

  15. #29
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    Sep 2011
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    Gothenburg, Sweden
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    Good advice as always. Building in Sweden and waiting for outside temperature to be above 20 degrees so you can keep the door open, while working evenings and weekends would make the building go on for a lifetime.. I'll be careful.

    Pontus

  16. #30
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    Apr 2008
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    That is a big part of why my build took so long. I have no heat in the building I used as my shop, so I was shut down from November through April every year.

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