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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Melbourne
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    Default Protecting timber floors from chair scratches

    So I have beautiful grey ironbark polished floors and have been looking for some way of protecting it from scratches from chairs. I tried the felt stick-ons and they were okay for a while but then picked up grit, and other rubbish and started to scratch the floor. Then I spent more money on the nylon protectors but they left marks on the floor as the nylon was dragged across. Teflon was worse. Rubber cups were okay but they look ugly and break down easily.

    Then the other day in Bunnies I saw a new 3M product -- circles of cork with sticky backs. Cork! Perfect, it's durable but soft enough not to mark or scratch timber. Only trouble is the packs were about $10 for half a dozen circles, and they looked pretty thin. Then a great idea hit me - I bought a pack of cork tiles for $10 and just cut my own (the cork tiles are 5 mm thick). A bit of liquid nails to fix them on the bottom of my chairs and the scratching problem is gone. With the leftover cork tiles I made my daughter a corkboard to pin her drawings on. Everybody wins....

    Just thought I'd share

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  3. #2
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    Default

    Another trick is a modification of a Quaker method. They used to drill the bottoms of their chair-legs to insert dowels/wooden plugs, which were easily replaced and reduced wear on the chair-legs.

    Instead of using wooden dowels, you can use soft plastic or rubber. They can be just a press-fit, no need to glue...
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc (AKA "Ghost who posts." )

  4. #3
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    Oct 2003
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    Perth
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    Default

    Cork is definately the way to go. My method is to buy a dozen bottles of Penfolds Bin 389 because they have really good corks in them. As an incidental matter, you have to drink the wine, but frankly, that is a minor inconvenience.

    And of course the great advantage of buying your cork this way is that they are already round.

    Alternatively I can supply you with corks at the ridiculously low price of $40 each.

    Let me know if this arrangement will suit you.

    Regards
    Pete J

  5. #4
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    Default

    OK I will give you greenie.

  6. #5
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    I have the solution to your problem in one word.....................................

































    BEANBAGS!!!!!

  7. #6
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    Jun 1999
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christopha
    I have the solution to your problem in one word.....................................

































    BEANBAGS!!!!!
    But wooden beanbags aren't as comfortable.
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  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Eden Hills, South Australia
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    Default

    If your chair legs are big enough you could combine the Quaker method with Pete's idea and drill a hole in the bottom just big enough to accept a bottle cork.

    Or make smaller corks on the lathe.

    Or use a pug-cutter.

    I wonder if a synthetic closure ("artificial cork") would work?
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them . . . well, I have others.

  9. #8
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    Default

    Well, they're no good for corking wine bottles, so they'd better be good for something

    When we got our floors done up in Sydney, the guy gave us a sheet of black felt stuff to cut out and glue on the chair and table legs. Trouble is all the dog hair and everything else sticks to it, so I like the cork idea.
    "I don't practice what I preach because I'm not the kind of person I'm preaching to."

  10. #9
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    Default

    Or a piece of soft wood instead of cork? Radiata, balsa?
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them . . . well, I have others.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Newcastle
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    Talking

    custos I have sympathy, I pollished the floors about 8 years ago and worried about each scratch .......for the first 3...4....years
    Then I realized with two grand kids and another on the way its just a floor

    If it realy gets to you though I have seen plastic casters with carpet in the base

    I used the stick on felt but they do need cleaning regularly

    The cork sounds ok but being soft will also allow stuff to get imbedded into it

    Bottom line it's still a floor and the chairs are only one part , theres high heals, stones caught in the tread of a shoe, Grandkids ( the worst ) etc etc

    Oh almost forgot must put in a



    Rgds


    Ashore

  12. #11
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    Default

    We used the screw on plastic bases that have the stick in felt insert.

    Only on for 6 months or so but going OK.

    Good idea with gluing the cork on tho' .


    Cheers.................Sean.


    The beatings will continue until morale improves.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Hi
    My mate has these most beautiful floors and was really worried about scrachtes I raided my leather work shop for old 5mm (thick) scrapes and basically just glued pieces (Cut to fit) under her chair legs and table legs longer wearing than felt and much less expensive than cork and don't go fluffy like felt does
    works a treat often we can't use the bellies and legs of hides and have quite a lot left over if you're stuck mate you can pm me your address and I can send you some but I'm moving house next week end but it will have send them after
    the 13th no charge mate they're bits that wouldn't get used for anything but testing dye colours on so if you can give me the dimentions I can cut them and just pop them in a post pack for you if that helps any
    Cheers Bio
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  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Aust
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    Default

    I have solid oak chairs where the front legs are straight but rear legs on a angle.

    I have polished solid wood floors.

    Slipstick Sliders CB210 and CB215 | Slipstick Foot

    CB210-PackagingFrontBack1.jpg

    The above product seems to be designed for angled legs but doesn't mention wood floors.

    Slipstick Sliders CB250o and CB255o | Slipstick Foot

    0SSF111301-CB250o_ImageSet_Packaging-1024x644.jpg
    the above seems to be for hardwood floors but says for Not suitable for Legs angled greater than 5 degrees.

    Any opinions on this product I am trying to not use felt.

    Q2
    The CB250 product says indentations may occur in soft wood floors, I have spotted gum which has a Janka rating of 11, is that soft? I am thinking its not given Jarrah is 8.5 and bamboo 6

    Q3
    or is the consensus that cork is best from this thread years back?

  15. #14
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    Melb
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    Default

    If the protector wears out, wouldnt you expose the screw which causes a lot of damage. I feel they are risky protectors.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Aust
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by justonething View Post
    If the protector wears out, wouldnt you expose the screw which causes a lot of damage. I feel they are risky protectors.
    i thought the screw head sits deep down beneath the brown plastic rig not just the softer oring in the lighter colour?

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