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  1. #1
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    Default 6 stud toyota stub axles for trailer

    Dear All

    Am I kidding myself if I think it is an easy (and cheap) job to convert my 5 stud Ford stub axle, 4 wheel trailer to 6 stud toyota stubs so that I can use the same wheels as my Hilux?

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  3. #2
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    I did the same thing with my off road trailer, so I could fit 16" Toyota split rims. Best thing I ever did to that trailer. I got the hubs from my local trailer fabricator guy as second hand units for $10.00 each. They fit straight on Ford stub axles/bearings

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    brilliant, thanks. I am off to see the wrecker/trailer man now

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    Quote Originally Posted by YarrD View Post
    brilliant, thanks. I am off to see the wrecker/trailer man now
    gee your trailer man is open late

  6. #5
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    you do need to be aware that you have to derate your axles if you go over 14" wheels.

    cheers
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  7. #6
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    can you explin that soundman?
    Regards, Bob Thomas

    www.wombatsawmill.com

  8. #7
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    This should explain derating.

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/showthread.php?t=79721

    Nev

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    you do need to be aware that you have to derate your axles if you go over 14" wheels.

    cheers


    I haven't found that to be an issue at all. I think the ford bearings are beefier than the holden bearings anyway.

    I have a rubber suspension axle setup on mine. The type that is used in some horse floats. I don't like springs and shackles hanging down in an off road trailer.
    I have had my trailer loaded up several times with a pallets of dry press common bricks, and it didn't hasn't missed a beat.

    I am in the process of slightly modifying and repainting my trailer at the moment.
    The wheels are off, and the stub axles and bearings are all as good as new.
    I pack the bearings with the best grease available, which I think is the key to longevity.

    Just my opinion though.

  10. #9
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    Axle load ratings are calculated on the basis of a certain size wheel.

    generaly all wheels below 14" are considered the same, above 14" the actual wheel diameter gets considerably bigger and thus the possible bending forces ( side thrust forces) on the axle stub.

    for the most part the axle strength is determined by the strength of the smallest parts of the axle stub... which is determined by the inside diameter of the bearings used.

    and yes ford bearings are much stronger than holden bearings

    the maximum strength of a holden bearing axle is 1 tonne on 14" rims........but many consider that to be generous.

    Ford bearing axles are genearly considered capable of 1.5 tonnes....... but many will limit them to 1.2 tonnes on 14" rims.

    both should be derated when using larger wheels.

    cheers
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  11. #10
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    As long as you have decent axles as well, it seems that Ford bearings are rated for considerably more weight than 1.2 tonnes on 14" rims.

    The attached table link shows a tyre diameter of 790mm (diam on my trailer) with a 50mm axle having a load capacity of 1.8tonnes.
    http://www.campertrailers.org/axles_bearings.htm
    This seems plenty when considering tyres will probably be the week link in a setup as indicated above.
    My tyres (7.5 x 16 LT) can carry a maxcimum load of 1160kg at 65 psi at 95kmh.

    As I mentioned above.... I have loaded her up without any problems. I had it loaded in 2007, with 700kg of crap, and drove it up and down Frazer Island without incident. Hell of a lot of stress plowing through soft sand, and no problems except for ripping the jockey wheel off.

  12. #11
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    Just found this info which states that the max axle load is 1500kg for 14" wheels, and to drop that to 1250kg for 16" wheels. Goes along way to support what soundman is saying.

    FYI

    Fossil

    http://www.alltrailerspares.com.au/u...Web%20Site.pdf

  13. #12
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    remember that the bearings them selves will probably stand much higher loads as will the wheels.

    the limitation is the mild steel axle and the thinnest part of that axle.

    also the permisable vertical may also be much greater but the transverse loading also has to be considered.......if used for off road applications that increased transverse loading has to be considered.

    the tyres were mentioned....if those are pasenger tyres, it will be on thing, but light truck tyres will carry a great deal more.

    so it all come down to the axle being the weakest point......probably followed by the wheel studs.... because all of the standard trailer hube rely on the wheel studs to carry the load, where many of the vehicles on the road carry the main load on the hub centre its self.

    cheers
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by soundman View Post
    the limitation is the mild steel axle and the thinnest part of that axle.
    Not exactly mild steel...


    Quote Originally Posted by soundman
    generaly all wheels below 14" are considered the same, above 14" the actual wheel diameter gets considerably bigger and thus the possible bending forces ( side thrust forces) on the axle stub.
    Generally "passenger" car wheel & tyre combinations are considered the same whether they're 14", 15-16-17".
    Too many projects, so little time, even less money!
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  15. #14
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    Well put it this way, the steel in the axles supplied for trailer fabrication is soft enough to be machined, and as far as i know is not high tensile and those I have seen show no signs of post machining heat treatment... so even if it isn't true mild steel it will be a low order steel product.


    as for the wheel sizes
    the documentation provided by several of the trailer parts suppliers most certainly specify clearly that the axle ratings are different for different wheel size groups.

    follow the link already posted at all trailer spares for details.

    cheers
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  16. #15
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    OK, see the words "Trailer Bloke" next to my Avatar... and the bit in my signature about "Trailer specialist"...

    Seeing as I worked in the Trailer & Caravan industry for nearly 10 years, and most of them were with the two biggest axle manufacturers and undercarriage parts suppliers in the country, I think I know a little of what I'm talking about without having to read about it on a web page!!

    If you read the company profile for All Trailer Spares, you'll see it states "The business is primarily a wholesaling warehouse for trailer spare parts, and offering advice...", which means they are not the "be all and end all" of the trailer industry, and are just repeating what most of the people in that industry already know, and they are even using other companies photos and diagrams taken from AL-KO International's and Industrial Spring Engineer's parts books.

    Well put it this way, the steel in the axles supplied for trailer fabrication is soft enough to be machined, and as far as i know is not high tensile and those I have seen show no signs of post machining heat treatment... so even if it isn't true mild steel it will be a low order steel product.
    Let's put it this way, the bar stock used for trailer axle manufacture is either SAE 1038 or SAE 1045 Medium Carbon steel, commonly used in the manufacture of a range of automotive components such as Con rods, and steering and suspension components. This SAE range of steel can be quench hardened for even greater strength, but not cost effectively for the Trailer & Caravan industry.

    the maximum strength of a holden bearing axle is 1 tonne on 14" rims........but many consider that to be generous.

    Ford bearing axles are genearly considered capable of 1.5 tonnes....... but many will limit them to 1.2 tonnes on 14" rims.
    Who's this "many" you refer to? Not something I've come accross in the trailer & caravan industry, and certainly not something that AL-KO and Melbourne Trailers care to state about their axles.

    as for the wheel sizes
    the documentation provided by several of the trailer parts suppliers most certainly specify clearly that the axle ratings are different for different wheel size groups.
    This "documentation" is unchanged from a time when passenger car wheels were 13" or 14", and Off Road vehicles had 15" or 16" wheels with big heavy tyres. Now with the increasing variety of passenger car wheels and tyres ranging from 14" to 24", the generalisation that all rim sizes larger than 14" will derate a trailer axle is simply not true! It is the extra unsprung weight of a heavy off road tyre that derates its rated carrying capacity!!
    Too many projects, so little time, even less money!
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