Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 52 of 52
  1. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Whian Whian
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Tom....Thanks for your input. Your summation is correct, and I started off from that vantage point, focussing on safety per bit quality AND the process itself. Certainly, the advantages of forming the large, yet shallow concave depressions by means of lowering then pressing the stock down upon the router bit were the time saving and the ease of operation. It would appear that you are saying that a jig to hold the stock with the router fixed above, then manually plunged down for each hollow is the only really safe way to do it. Hmmm, I see clearly what you mean, and never having lowered a piece of 1 inch stock onto a 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 inch wide router bit, I don't actually have a realistic idea of what it feels like! Hence this forum I guess.....

    And Aldav, you are also most likely correct! Maybe I should try to find a GERMAN router bit!! More seriously, I'll most likely go down the Arden Routers path.

    I wonder if anyone has tried to do what I originally described, and could tell me whether the blasted thing was ripped out of their control?? That being said, Elan's jig concept is bound to be of great assistance.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    29
    Posts
    4,611

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pat the Rat View Post
    It would appear that you are saying that a jig to hold the stock with the router fixed above, then manually plunged down for each hollow is the only really safe way to do it.
    I gotta disagree with that; plunging from the top might be a bit safer, but I certainly wouldn't say that doing it in a table is unsafe. Just be sure to have one edge on the table and hard against the stop (the right hand edge when facing the table, as the rotation of the bit will naturally keep it pulled to the fence), then lower the other edge as if it's connected by a hinge. Don't try to drop down flat from the top, THAT'S definitely not safe.

  4. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Whian Whian
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Feels like a game of "Piggy in the Middle", and no prizes for guessing which player of the three that I am!! Thanks for the reassuring explanation, Elan, 'cos that is the exact methodology that I had developed in mind. If the work piece winds up in the surf at Byron Bay, I'll get you to swim out and grab it!! I'll go ahead and source a router bit and let you know the outcome: I'm also interested in how many holes I can get through before the carbides start to dull. Thanks again mate.

  5. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Age
    85
    Posts
    783

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pat the Rat View Post
    I'm thinking about a project which will involve quite a few concave hollows each about 32 - 35 mm diameter and about 12 - 15 mm deep, using a Triton TRA 001 (circa 2000 model?) in a Triton Router Table. Since I'll be doing quite a few in timbers ranging from Queensland Maple, Silky Oak to Camphor Laurel, and want a pretty good finish, I'm looking for advice as to a quality bit that will last with minimum wear. Can anyone advise me as to a reliable brand, and possibly a source, especially if it's in the Northern Rivers region?

    Additionally, when running the job, I'm thinking of pressing the rectangular workpieces down onto the router bit, registering the far long edge to the fence, and the left edge to a stop which is perpendicular to the fence. I anticipate being able to the lift the workpiece without the bit burning the resultant concave hollow or catching the outer edges of the hollow.... in your expert opinions, does this sound like a watertight and safe procedure??
    Just as a matter of interest you mention rectangular pieces but you have not given the size of the blocks to be used
    Learn new Routing skills with the use of the template guides

    Log on to You Tube for a collection of videos 'Routing with Tom O'Donnell'

  6. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    29
    Posts
    4,611

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Template Tom View Post
    Just as a matter of interest you mention rectangular pieces but you have not given the size of the blocks to be used
    He mentions it further down the thread; 250*125*20

  7. #51
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Age
    85
    Posts
    783

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    He mentions it further down the thread; 250*125*20
    Thanks elanjacobs
    Learn new Routing skills with the use of the template guides

    Log on to You Tube for a collection of videos 'Routing with Tom O'Donnell'

  8. #52
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Age
    85
    Posts
    783

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    He mentions it further down the thread; 250*125*20
    Thanks elanjacobs
    Learn new Routing skills with the use of the template guides

    Log on to You Tube for a collection of videos 'Routing with Tom O'Donnell'

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Similar Threads

  1. QUEENSLAND CNC Router - 6090 Heavy Duty Quality - Brisbane Region only.
    By Billyboydes in forum WOODWORK - Tools & Machinery
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 6th Jun 2017, 03:46 PM
  2. Router bit quality and range
    By Wol in forum ROUTING FORUM
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 20th Jul 2015, 10:22 PM
  3. using a router to turn a shallow concave??
    By HSS in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 30th Jan 2012, 04:52 AM
  4. Router bit quality testing
    By aniceone2hold in forum ROUTING FORUM
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 5th Oct 2006, 03:36 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •