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  1. #136
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    Of the two options you have presented, Derek, I think it just depends on how much you really want to use square dogs. If you have your heart set on that, you should go with the first solution because having round dogs will always feel second-best. However, if using round dogs won't bug you then choose option 2.

    Alternatively, don't do any thing to the dog hole strip, but cut a 4-5 degree face on the dogs.
    Cheers
    Jeremy


    Screwing up in new ways every day
    Cheers

    Jeremy
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well it were done quickly

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  3. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
    Oh boy.

    Do you get those moments when it dawns on you that you made a really stupid mistake?

    This is a doozy but it is repairable. I would like your ideas.

    Its the bench (what else?). I have just realised that the dog hole strip is in backwards. Backwards! No, don't ask the question.

    If the dogs were vertical, I'd just leave them and use them reversed. But the holes are angled at 2 degrees ... the wrong way.

    I have two choices as I see it.

    The first is that I saw out the dog hole strip (using my bandsaw), make a new dog hole strip and insert that. This is my preference although it is more work.

    The second choice is to fill in the existing dog holes with a plug (contrasting Jarrah?), and drill this for a round dog.

    Thoughts?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Derek, you made such a song and dance about square dog holes that it would be a serious derelection to patch the holes and opt for round dog holes Ė even though they are more versatile.

    Why not just learn to plane left-handed?
    .
    I know you believe you understand what you think I wrote, but I'm not sure you realize that what you just read is not what I meant.


    Regards, Woodwould.

  4. #138
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    Derek,

    Are you going to be happy with a new bench with filled in square dog holes? You've been advocating square dog holes and I suspect it may be a disappointment to have your new bench finished without them. I know it's a lot of work but I would throw the deadline out the window, relax and re-do the square dog holes.

    Regards,

    Denim.

  5. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
    Oh boy.

    Do you get those moments when it dawns on you that you made a really stupid mistake?

    This is a doozy but it is repairable. I would like your ideas.

    Its the bench (what else?). I have just realised that the dog hole strip is in backwards. Backwards! No, don't ask the question.

    If the dogs were vertical, I'd just leave them and use them reversed. But the holes are angled at 2 degrees ... the wrong way.

    I have two choices as I see it.

    The first is that I saw out the dog hole strip (using my bandsaw), make a new dog hole strip and insert that. This is my preference although it is more work.

    The second choice is to fill in the existing dog holes with a plug (contrasting Jarrah?), and drill this for a round dog.

    Thoughts?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Judging by our previous conversation, you seemed definite on square dog holes. Can you get your bench top into your bandsaw?

    (Personally, I'd like to see you plug & drill round ones...because that way I can learn how to do mine right!!)

  6. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
    Oh boy.

    Do you get those moments when it dawns on you that you made a really stupid mistake?The second choice is to fill in the existing dog holes with a plug (contrasting Jarrah?), and drill this for a round dog.
    Derek
    I like the idea of a contrasting plug. Make a feature of it.
    Regards,
    Jim

  7. #141
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    Unhappy dog holes

    damn

    Option one
    as you had decided on square you'll never be happy with round

    might be more work but then again would it really? We're comparing making plugs, plugging and drilling v ripping, assembling and glueing

    Would you use the bandsaw or tablesaw? I'd rip it out on the tablesaw, two passes and make a new dog strip to slot in (you could vary the dog holes if there are any hindsight issues)

    another thought
    could you rip the dog strip out in one piece and glue two 3mm* shims (?) to each side and reglue the top? I'd edit one of your benchtop photos to describe what I mean as I'm not sure this is clear

    * or thickness of saw blade
    Last edited by Sawdust Maker; 22nd Feb 2012 at 07:38 AM. Reason: another thought
    regards
    Nick
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    tornavi
    Without wood it's just ...

  8. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
    Do you get those moments when it dawns on you that you made a really stupid mistake?
    Increasingly, it seems! There have been a number of occasions recently that have me wondering......

    Anyway, don't feel too bad about it- reversing the slope of dog holes is an easy mistake to make! I almost did exactly the same thing when fixing my tail vise a couple of months back. I was workng from the 'front', which meant I had to make the mirror image of what it seemed it should have been. Fortunately, I picked up my blunder at the marking-out stage, or there would have been some loud profanities & gnashing of teeth. I had only the one piece of matching wood that was big enough, so it would have been a very costly blunder....

    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
    I have two choices as I see it.
    Not really.

    Looks like the gallery is crying for blood (& sweat) on this one. In any case, you've put so much effort into this bench to get what you want - do you really want to look at a row of patched holes reminding you of your moment of lapsed concentration forever more?

    It's more a question of whether you have enough wood to fix it? I seem to remember you had to be very creative to get enough in the first place.

    And manhandling such a big, awkward lump over the bandsaw will be a fraught operation, will it not? I'd be thinking of using a well-fettled ripsaw. The sweat will be part of your penance......

    Cheers,
    IW

  9. #143
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    Derek

    Welcome to the Senior Moment club.

    I have a bench I made a long time back using Tas Oak which has the square dog holes, If I was making another I would definitely do the same again.

    If you can live with one of the simple work arounds then that would solve the problem. However, having that solution in front of you as you work I suggest may not be an acceptable way of working. My suggestion would be to cut out the dog hole strip on the bandsaw, making sure there is adequate support on both sides of the bandsaw. Giving the BS table a good polish with triple E followed by a Carnuaba wax would also assist.
    I would use the method suggested by Sawdust Maker, and use either Jarrah strips to make a feature of the strips, or Tas Oak if you are short of Euro Oak.

    Regards

  10. #144
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    Here is my idea - arrived at before I went to bed last night, but I thought I'd post it after hearing the ideas of others.

    The bandsaw, even my large Hammer, is too unwieldy to make a straight cut. Not to mention maneuvering the heavy top into position and keeping it on track. Too hard.

    A circular saw has promise but mine is a dinky 7 1/2" blade (I used to use it to break down sheet goods).

    The need is to cut straight and keep the two cuts parallel.

    The best tool here is a router. Reject the temptation to save the dog strip. It is not too much effort to make another. Rout out one side and then the other. I can only go to a depth of 2", but that will ensure that the top section is a clean edge and square. I'll flip the top and rout from the reverse side. Then make a new dog hole strip and fit it.

    Let me know what you think.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, many handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  11. #145
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    Derek, I'd make a pass with the router, flip the top, separate the two sections with the circular saw, then finish the dressing of the cut with the router and a flush cut bit; severing a heavy board runs the risk of pinching the bit.

    Or you could make the cut with a decent handsaw, they excel at deep cuts like this.

  12. #146
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    I would spent 15 minutes sharpening a good rip-filed handsaw 5ppi minimum and at least 26" long), then turn on some nice music with a suitable tempo and settle down for a session of handsawing. Keep up the fluids while you saw and even do it in several 10-15 minute sessions. Then finish the surface with a jointer plane.
    Cheers

    Jeremy
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well it were done quickly

  13. #147
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    Derek although I think your router method is fine, is you have concerns and get desperate then there is always this.



    It sounds a bit terrifying but because its vertical angle is adjustable it can produce a very straight square cut, and because I have filed the chain in a special way and by taking it slowly and stead the finish is surprisingly reasonable. The kerf is ~6 mm.

  14. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmk89 View Post
    ....Keep up the fluids while you saw and even do it in several 10-15 minute sessions.......
    Several 10-15 minute sessions, Jeremy? Tch, tch, you young fellas! Decrepit as I am, I would bet half a stubby my trusty 'Spearior' could easily whack that bench in two in something under 15 minutes....

    No gaurantees on quality of cut if I'm racing the clock, though.

    Cheers,
    IW

  15. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Several 10-15 minute sessions, Jeremy? Tch, tch, you young fellas! Decrepit as I am, I would bet half a stubby my trusty 'Spearior' could easily whack that bench in two in something under 15 minutes....

    No gaurantees on quality of cut if I'm racing the clock, though.

    Cheers,
    It's a while since I've been described as a young fella, Ian. So thanks for making my day.

    I was making due allowance for the toughness of jarrah and the thickness of the board. I reckon that my 28" 4 tpi Tyzack would get it done pretty swiftly too but I didn't want to brag
    Cheers

    Jeremy
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well it were done quickly

  16. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmk89 View Post
    It's a while since I've been described as a young fella, Ian. So thanks for making my day.
    I was being facetious, of course, Jeremy, but OTH, I've discovered that 16 years has made quite a difference to my stamina........

    Quote Originally Posted by jmk89 View Post
    ...... I reckon that my 28" 4 tpi Tyzack would get it done pretty swiftly too but I didn't want to brag
    Hey man - bragging is allowed when it comes to good tools......


    Cheers,
    IW

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