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  1. #1
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    Default bandsaw meets heavy machine base

    Using the “Heavy Machine Base” to mount the SBW4300 band saw.

    As promised here are some details of mounting my band saw on the heavy machine base. The machine has been sitting on a delta style base since it arrived before last year’s wood show. As you can see by the pictures I oversized the base to pick up some stability and oversized the timber (with some fiddle) to pick up some strength. As the machine is 170Kg and the bases rated capacity is 150Kg this was always a temporary and less than satisfactory arrangement.
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    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
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    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

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  3. #2
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    To start.
    Unpack the base & lay the parts out. Sort out the bag of bolts & check out the assembly diagram supplied.
    Fit the wheels & castors to their plates with the nuts & bolts supplied. I personally am not a great fan of spring washers so I dispensed with those but did fit some 5/16 flat washers under the nuts & bolt t heads.
    Thread the jackscrews in their sleaves. You might want to add a bit of lube here first.
    Find the two small flat washers in the kit & put them on the turned ends of the jackscrews. Next drop the round jack feet on & fit the circlips.
    You should now have the business ends of the base assembled.

    This frame can now be made any size (within reason) by the use of common 30mm x 30mm RHS (square tube). Thickness needed depends on application but I reckon 2mm would be a minimum. After all it does need to hold a thread.
    The base kit had been designed so that the spacer tubes are secured by drilling & taping the spacer tubes. It is probably reasonable to weld the tubes in or to drill all the way through & through bolt.

    The following is specific to the SBW4300.
    Cut two lengths of 30x30 RHS 530mm long. Clean up the ends. Lay out the pairs of corners & thread the RHS through the tube sections that go all the way through the corners.

    Make the tubes sit flush with the outside of the base. Mark the RHS through the fixing holes in the corner sections and remove the tubes. It is best to now mark a center line down the tube ends and mark the centres of the holes to be drilled.

    Drill the holes 17/64” and tap M8. Now is a good time to clean & paint the tubes.
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    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  4. #3
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    Soundman,

    Where did you get the "heavy machine base" and how much was it?

    Jack.
    "There is no dark side of the moon really. Matter of fact it's all dark."

  5. #4
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    Krikey jack, you got skid marks under your mouse or what?
    Let me finish the story & all will be clear.


    As I was saying.
    Cut an other two lengths of RHS 700mm long & clean up the cuts. Thread these into the blind sockets in the base (fully home) and mark through the holes. Refine the marking out, drill & tap as before. Clean & paint these.
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    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  6. #5
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    Come on, hurry up!!!!!

    Jack
    "There is no dark side of the moon really. Matter of fact it's all dark."

  7. #6
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    Take the two short tubes & thread them into the pairs of corners & secure with the short bolts supplied ( I added washers ). Don’t overdo the tightening, there is only a couple of mm of thread.
    Put the two completed ends on a flat surface facing each other and thread the long tubes into one of the ends. Do not bolt. Now slip the other ends into the remaining end assembly and bring the base together. Now secure with the bolts (& washers).
    The base is now complete. Check it out & make sure its right.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  8. #7
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    Lift the machine up & place it on the base. Some form of crane is the go here. You should find there is a little clearance around the base. Get the machine square on the base to your satisfaction & drill through the mounting holes for fixing bolts. I drilled & tapped the base (which requires removing the machine again) but nuts & bolts should be OK. You will need at least 85mm bolts; nylock nuts are a good idea.
    Check it out. Job done.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  9. #8
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    Because this is a big machine this base (or any base) may not be enough for the heavy work. For every day fiddle band sawing it will probably be OK, but if you plan to put “LOGS” through it some help will be needed.
    You could either oversize the base to increase the footprint or fit some stabilising outriggers.
    Because the tubes that connect the pairs of corners go through, I think some plug in outriggers would be the go
    I am planning some plug in outriggers combined with an outfeed table for this unit & will post details when done.

    This is provided as general information only. Please satisfy yourself that you are happy with this arrangement & consult “qualified help” if you can not assess yourself that what is detailed is safe and appropriate.
    Cheers

    This base my be available elsewhere but check out my post in buy & sell. http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com...ad.php?t=15179
    cheers
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  10. #9
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    Excellent tutorial, I am now looking forward to getting my 2 bases from you - which should be here today. All I need now is my workshop to be complete.

    Cheers
    The Numbat is a small striped marsupial whose whole diet consists of termites.

  11. #10
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    The posty should be heeevin them bases on the counter very soon if not already. thanks numbat.
    It was mentioned to me today that some people may not have "means of lifting".
    It is possible to get most of this sort of base under a machine by tilting the machine & slipping the assembled halves of the base under.
    You will need a mate or two to help but it can be done.
    It can be made even easier if you tilt the machine & slip blocks under the front back & both sides. Put them in the middle of the sides and the base can then be assembled under the machine as the bases only get under the corners.
    Ahhh but then theres the fun getting the blocks out
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  12. #11
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    One of the bases is for a BAS350 (14 ") bandsaw - so I think that 2 of us should be able to manhandle it onto the base.

    The other is for a yet to be purchased tablesaw (probably a TSC10HB).

    Although a bonus of my workshop building (actually a basement workshop is that I have a 3 phase supply in now - just have to be able to afford to to get the sub board put in then all the wiring etc - after spending a small fortune on the extensions)

    Cheers
    The Numbat is a small striped marsupial whose whole diet consists of termites.

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