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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post

    You need to provide your own materials ,we will not be providing materials.

    Plus ,your own basic tool kit.
    Hand files, rasps, chisels ,sandpaper’s.
    Matt, what would the basic needs be to make a handle in a day, anything in addition to the above to speed things up?
    CHRIS

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    Matt, what would the basic needs be to make a handle in a day, anything in addition to the above to speed things up?
    A CNC machine would possibly speed things up considerably but I donít have one nor the knowledge or brains to use one Criss.

    Ok back to us basic shed dwellers.
    I use a bandsaw to cut the blank, I also use a trim router with a small round over bit to hog off some off the waste.
    But I find most of the work is just sanding and smoothing and fennsing the shape which just takes time.

    But I think the most fussy thing to cut is the backsaw Mitre slot if your doing a back saw that is.

    Cheers Matt.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    Matt, what would the basic needs be to make a handle in a day, anything in addition to the above to speed things up?
    Personally, I cannot see myself making just a handle in isolation. I would need the other components - the sawplate, brass back and sawnuts - available to make the handle to accept all the other components. You can't exactly make a handle then go out and find the sawplate to fit what you have cut. Unless you make your own sawnuts, you would have to drill the holes in the handle to suit the nuts, not make the nuts to fit the holes.

    I would welcome input from the more experienced sawmakers here but, the way I see it, first you decide what you want the saw to do (rip/crosscut, fine detailed work or roughing out, hardwood or softwood etc). that will determine what sawplate you want and how to configure it - thickness, TPI, rip/crosscut, pitch, rake, fleam, length - and will determine if it will be a backsaw, panelsaw, gents saw, bowsaw etc. Then once you have all these details worked out then you design a handle that will hold all the bits and put your hand in a suitable position to use the saw comfortably and accurately.

    I see little point in turning up and making a saw handle in isolation as the chances of it ever being united with all the other parts to make a practical saw are pretty remote. I might be off track here but that's how I see it.

    Maybe Paul and Ian could provide some input to this.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
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  5. #34
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    So, the idea is to knock out the basic shape using your bandsaw and trim router then onto hand fettling the rest. I saw someone somewhere using a spindle sander for shaping, is this a good idea or not? I am inclined to have a bit of a trip down to say hello and make a handle if things go to plan, it should be getting a bit cooler by then.
    CHRIS

  6. #35
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    I can post a little more detail at a later date if there is a request, but a brief comment is there are two distinct scenarios: Firstly you are making a saw up from scratch requiring all components including timber, saw screws and back if you are making a back saw, Secondly making a new handle for an existing saw in which case you already have the hardware. I would suggest that to complete the first scenario will be difficult in your time frame of a single day, but the second is very "doable."

    You may be making a new handle for many reasons. The old handle could be broken, non existent or just plain butt ugly like anything made after WW2 and some even before that time. My sequence is cut out the rough blank, refine the outline, cut the saw slot, drill the holes for the saw screws and then do all the shaping of edges and other refinements that tart up a block of wood to make into something to be admired. Surface finishing may not be completed the same day but that depends on the style you chose. Ian uses a technique that could be done on the same day.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Secondly making a new handle for an existing saw in which case you already have the hardware. I would suggest that to complete the first scenario will be difficult in your time frame of a single day, but the second is very "doable."
    Good point Paul. Even though I havetwo saws that I am making new handles for over time I am obviously concentrating more on the scratch builds of the backsaws in the project.

    With a replacement handle build, you would still have the sawplate, brass back and sawnuts on hand to use to fit the new handle to.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
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  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    So, the idea is to knock out the basic shape using your bandsaw and trim router then onto hand fettling the rest. I saw someone somewhere using a spindle sander for shaping, is this a good idea or not? I am inclined to have a bit of a trip down to say hello and make a handle if things go to plan, it should be getting a bit cooler by then.
    Chris,

    You would be most welcome, and if we can assist in any way please shoutout.

    A little bit more detail on what I do, with out the sarcasm YOUR ATTENTION PLEASE, your attention..
    But as Paul and my self and Ian have discussed there is many ways to skin a cat.

    First I get my saw blank cut to a rough square shape and thickness to about 22 mm thick
    22 mm is my preferred thickness but not the rule.

    Next I draw or use a pattern to draw out the shape of the saw handle on the stock.

    I then now cut this roughly out with a bandsaw, but only on the outside of the handle, I donít bother getting rid of the waste on the inside quite yet.
    Next and I feel this is the most important step of the whole saw making process.

    I cut the saw slot for the blade in the saw handle cheek.
    My reasoning is this, the trickiest bit to get right if itís not right you need to start again,hence why I do it very early on.

    Once the saw slot is done and straight, I feel more comfortable doing the rest of the saw handle.

    I now cut out the centre waste using forsner bits followed by using a disk sander and a bobbin sander to clean up and square the edge of the handle to the face sides and using various files on the inside weíre I canít reach with the bobbin sander,
    Once the edgers are square i can then use the trim router with a small pattern round over bit to hog of the waste weíre needed.
    Then follows the sanding rounding sanding sanding till itís all nice and smooth and feeling comfortable in my hand.
    Finally the saw blade is reinserted and I start the process of drilling for the saw bolts extra.

    This is for a handsaw a backsaw is slightly more involved as you have the back mortise as well to do.

    I hope this helps in a little way.

    Cheers Matt.

  9. #38
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    I was going through the timber stash looking for something for another job and I found this nice piece of sheoak.

    Over the jointer and through the thicknesser it went.

    Cleaned up alright and I should be able to get the two handles I need for my full-sized Disstons.

    20190209_150454.jpg
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
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  10. #39
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    Doug

    I appreciate that the pic you posted is going to end up with a thumbhole handle a la D8/D-8, but I had meant to point out that the damaged handle is one of the classic shapes. I call that style the No.12 Lookalikes.

    You can see where they were used in this old thread: Almost every manufacturer aspired to such a handle.

    When it is not a No.12

    In fact, although I have concentrated on Simonds saws for collector purposes, I have a few other areas of interest which include the No.12 "Lookalikes." This saw that I acquired recently is similar to yours in that it has the shape but lacks wheat carving. I don't know who made this one pictured as I have not received it yet: I may still not be able to identify a maker. very likely one of the major players.

    Lookalike saw.jpglookalike saw handle.jpgLookalike saw 3.jpg

    I expect you are sold on the thumbhole style, but this too is a very attractive handle. It would look magnificent in that she oak, but so would any handle .

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    I appreciate that the pic you posted is going to end up with a thumbhole handle a la D8/D-8, but I had meant to point out that the damaged handle is one of the classic shapes. I call that style the No.12 Lookalikes.

    ...

    I expect you are sold on the thumbhole style, but this too is a very attractive handle. It would look magnificent in that she oak, but so would any handle .
    Thanks for the info and link Paul.

    Yes I do want the thumbhole handle as I explained before. I certainly do not dislike the original handle and in fact, it was intact when I got it. Due to unfortunate circumstances a visitor passing through the shed managed to dislodge the saw from its safe resting place causing it to fall onto the concrete floor handle end first and broke the bottom off as well as the top horn. It defies belief how far out of his way this person went to have his little accident.

    Had that not happened I probably would not be bothering with rehandling it at all, but it is what it is.

    As I said before, that saw will be my rip-saw.

    The picture below is the one I will be making into my crosscut saw (currently filed rip). This one looks like a D-8.

    20190209_161241.jpg
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
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  12. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug3030 View Post

    The picture below is the one I will be making into my crosscut saw (currently filed rip). This one looks like a D-8.

    20190209_161241.jpg
    Doug

    I may have confused exactly what you were doing in my mind and not appreciated you were modifying two saws. That saw certainly looks like a D-8.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  13. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    I may have confused exactly what you were doing in my mind and not appreciated you were modifying two saws. That saw certainly looks like a D-8.

    Just to make sure it's clear, Paul.

    Saw number 1. No 12 lookalike, currently filed rip - getting a D-8 thumbhole handle in sheoak and becoming my ripsaw.

    Saw number 2. D-8 currently filed rip - refiling as crosscut, probably leave existing handle for now (it's in good condition) but later make a duplicate of its current handle in sheoak to match the other one.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
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  14. #43
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    I went out to the shed this morning fully intending to work on the Thumbhole handle for my saw.

    I went to start up the 14 inch bandsaw and remembered why I had not used it for a few years.

    One of our offspring had been given permission to use the bandsaw for a small project and decided to also use it to cut up big blocks of beeswax.

    She was making candles to sell at markets to make some money but finished up paying out $50 site fees and selling $10 worth of candles and bath bombs so she eventually lost interest in that.

    But anyway, I was left with a bandsaw full of bees wax, so that turned out to be my project for the day. NEVER EVER let anyone cut up beeswax on your bandsaw.

    I am not sure how long the bandsaw ran before the blade slipped off the back of the wheels, brining that ill-advised activity to an abrupt end, but in that short time the entire inside of the cabinet got splattered, the blade guides were covered, the tyres were fully waxed; even the trunion got more than its fair share. There was wax everywhere.

    I basically stripped the whole bandsaw back to its component parts, with the exception of removing the motor which remained unaffected, and the top wheel mount/blade tensioning mechanism, which was somehow spared the wax, probably due to it being located in the centre of the top wheel and the wax being distributed by centrifugal force.

    Half a bottle of kerosene later I have a clean bandsaw. While it was all in pieces I did any maintenance that looked due, such as dressing the tyres and the blade guides. Tyres got spun on the drive wheel and sanded smooth (120 grit to remove the irregularities and 240 grit to finish) while ensuring the crown was preserved and the blade guides went on the metal lathe to be re-faced - first time I have used the lathe on steel.

    It is nearly all back together now but final assembly will probably keep me busy until it is time to start cooking the roast lamb for Valentines Day dinner. So I probably won't get any saw handle making done today. Oh, and I better get all the beeswax out of the kitchen sink before I pick Jools up from the train too.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
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  15. #44
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    Doug

    On the positive side I am guessing there was very little rust.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  16. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    On the positive side I am guessing there was very little rust.
    No rust to speak of Paul. There was more rust on the new blade that had been hanging around waiting for me to clean the bandsaw than there was anywhere else.

    On the other side of the coin, somewhere along the line, probably when moving house the base has taken a knock and only three legs will touch the ground at a time. I loosened all the bolts but still no joy, so I removed each bolt one at a time and drilled the holes out a bit bigger. I didn't quite finish that before I had to go and get dinner started for Valentines Day.

    20190214_174817(1).jpg
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
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