Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Eden Hills, South Australia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Donkey's ear shooting board -- reversed slope

    A 'donkey's ear' shooting board is used for accurate shooting of mitres.

    Most donkey's ear shooting boards I've seen (only in books), have the workpiece sloping downwards, away from the plane. This seemed wrong to me, so I made one that holds the workpiece such that it slopes down towards the plane. My impression is that this makes it easier to hold the stock against the plane for trimming, and forces the combined workpiece/plane unit 'into' the corner of the jig (if this make sense). Whereas on a conventional donkey's ear the forces between the workpiece and the plane would tend to lift the workpiece off the jig and decrease the accuracy.

    I've never used a conventional donkey's ear shooting board, but would be grateful for any comments on this design, and the opinion of others who have used the conventional design.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them . . . well, I have others.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many
     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Newcatle
    Posts
    1,708
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Zen
    It must be perfect or else no one cuts these mitres.

    For long mitres I use a bearing guided 45 degree router bit and a straight edge.

    Your design looks fine and I agree with your idea of locking the board in the corner.

    What is the verdict?
    Does it work?
    Scally
    __________________________________________
    The ark was built by an amateur
    the titanic was built by professionals

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Eden Hills, South Australia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Lots of people use shooting boards, and lots of people use mitres, but I guess the two groups don't overlap, except for me.

    It works fine for me, though I do tend to use it only for small boxes. I wanted to hear from people who might have used other designs. But there's a whole lot o' nothin happening in this dynamic thread.

    Thanks for the interest, Scally.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    6,211
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Zenwood

    I do not have a Donkey's Ear, although one is on my To Do list.

    What I do is either (1) use a cutting or marking gauge to carefully mark out the edges of the cut, then plane them away, or (2) add a fence to the plane and guide it along this way.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Eden Hills, South Australia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Cheers, Derek. I tried adding a 45 degree triangular prism (in mahogany) to the Veritas jointer fence, but got average results. Last time I looked at the prism, it had distorted at bit and needed trueing up. Have you got pics of your fence?
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them . . . well, I have others.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    6,211
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Zenwood

    This is one option. When I get a chance I will post a few more.

    I own and use a Stanley #386 Jointer fence. See http://www.antiquetools.com/mini-col/stanley-386/ for a description and picture.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    kyogle N.S.W
    Age
    40
    Posts
    4,791
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Looks fine. I haven't got one. So I haven't much to say on it.

    The book I've got shows it being done the way you've done it. So, I guess it works well. Well, you'd know.

    I'm guessing, but I'd imagine the only problem one might face is when the board your shooting gets exceedingly long. However it wouldn't be too often a long board would need to be shot (shooted ?) that way I guess. Have you tried shooting a long board ? If so, is it awkward ?

    I've was thinking a way to solve this long board problem, to at least get more stability, maybe is to set it up such that a long board runs along the entire bench ie. horizontal, rather than having it with one end suspending high in the air. ????? Would mean the plane would have to sit on a run thats inclined at 45 degrees ??? Be interesting maybe ........

    Pretty looking plane you got there....what is it ?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    6,211
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi Jake

    That #606 Bed Rock is not my plane. I have a fence like that, but that picture is off another website.

    My favourite plane for cutting 45 degree chamfers is one I made myself: Jarrah body, thick tapered Mathieson blade (your favourite!), 12 degree bed and 30 degree bevel. It works incredibly well. Since making it about three years ago I stopped using my powered router. Pictures below.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    22
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Never used this type but I sure would like the basic plan when you arrive in Ottawa.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    kyogle N.S.W
    Age
    40
    Posts
    4,791
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Looks fine. Interesting to see a wooden plane with a 12 degree bed that works. I've always wondered if a wooden bed could be made that low without breaking.

    And thanks for the pictures. Good to see someone else who uses these blades.

    Personally like them because of there incredible thickness and also, of course because of their age. Like the old stuff. Thank god their edges hold up reasonably well or else I'd have to give up on them along with all the sentimental feelings they bring. oh, bugger!!! ..... I've just revealled my 'real' self.... ....no, no, no....I'm not really like that. I'm really a thick skinned country boy,,,,as tough as they come !!!!! damit..

    ....Geeeez, sometimes I think life would be easier if I was gay. Especially now since its 'ok' to be gay. In fact, I think its considered 'trendy' now isn't it ? Would mean, no more macho men crap to keep up with. I've been pretending to like football all my freaking life !!!! ....What for ?!? .....I mean, somebody should just give them all a football each so they don't have to fight over the same one, and just be done with it .!!!!!!

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Eden Hills, South Australia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by apricotripper
    The book I've got shows it being done the way you've done it.
    Which book is that, apricot? As I say, I've never seen this design anywhere else.
    Have you tried shooting a long board ? If so, is it awkward ?
    I've only used this on the sides of smallish boxes, as in my pics posts. For longer stock, a redesign which is rotated 45 degrees to the left, along the lines you suggest, would be the way to go. You might even be able to design a jig that holds the plane at 45 degrees, and then connects to a regular shooting board that holds the stock. Hmm...
    Pretty looking plane you got there....what is it ?
    The one in my pic is a Lie-Nielsen #4 in bronze. It's a beauty, in both senses. Generally I use a low-angle plane to do this kind of shooting, because it is largely endgrain. This one seemed to work better on the mahogany I was using at the time. One more reason to get a LN#9!

    YAKI: will take some more pics, which will give you an idea of the design.
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them . . . well, I have others.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    kyogle N.S.W
    Age
    40
    Posts
    4,791
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zenwood
    Which book is that, apricot? As I say, I've never seen this design anywhere else.
    The books called 'Making & Mastering WOOD PLANES' by David Finck. A mate of James Krenov. A found it a good read. Not too technical, but full of good points, not old. In fact I saw it the other day in a local QBD .......anyway the shooting board like yours is on p157. I've attached a photo of that page.

    We'll have to give that long board shoot idea more thought I reakon. Something that will be hard to overcome, even if we get it going is, handling such a large board deftly. It could be quite tricky sitting it just right against a fence, before every pass. Clumsy IMO.

    Anyway, Seeya.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Eden Hills, South Australia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by apricotripper
    The books called 'Making & Mastering WOOD PLANES' by David Finck.
    Well, there ya go: exactly the same design as mine, just when I thought I'd had an original idea. I'll see if I can post a pic of the other design (the 'conventional' one).

    Next question: anyone got a mitre jack?

    PS: Thanks for the PM apricot: I was away from the computer all day yesterday:eek:
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them . . . well, I have others.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sale
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,260
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've made up something similar to put a 45 degree mitre on a 40mm piece of very old and very tough redgum. The timber sits flat on the board and the plane is inclined at 45 degrees. the mitre ran 500mm and the accuracy is quite good.I would have to say 80 year old redgum was a PIA to run a plane through end grain and an edge did not last long, since then a low angle LN or LV jack plane has been high on the list. The sled has been used for the odd thing since but a 45 degree bit in a router table or even hand held for anything of a suitable thickness will always be my preference. Didn't realise it was a donkey board, but the name fits I had to be a donkey to attempt the job in the first place.


    JohnC

  16. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Eden Hills, South Australia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Here are some more pics. It was entirely made by dark-side methods, works really well too. Underneath is a batten allowing the jig to be held in the vice.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them . . . well, I have others.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Shooting board limitations.
    By LineLefty in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 10th Aug 2009, 10:57 AM
  2. Ramped Shooting Board
    By derekcohen in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 29th Jun 2005, 12:03 PM
  3. Light-Side alternatives to the shooting board
    By Rocker in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10th Jun 2005, 05:32 PM
  4. How to make a shooting board
    By LineLefty in forum HAND TOOLS - UNPOWERED
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 9th Jul 2004, 04:41 PM
  5. Shooting board questions
    By ClintO in forum WOODWORK - GENERAL
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11th May 2004, 01:38 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •