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  1. #1
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    Default spindle question

    Hi,

    a mate has asked some questions re a project he is working on..and i'd thought I consult the collective brains trust here....
    He's after 2.2m long 38mm diameter spindles - he is keen to use recycled timber (i know its easy to go to Bunnings and buy dowel, but that's not the preferred option in this case..). I figure that assuming lathe length is not an issue, there would be considerable issues with flex given the diameter and length...and am thinking turning sections to be glued together is probably most practical option????

    cheers

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  3. #2
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    Default

    There would be a big flex problem. In theory it can be done but is the effort worth it. The tail stock can be mounted at the other end of a long bench then you need to come up with a tool rest to move along the bench as well as a few steady rests. Far easier to make a simple dowel cutter. As to gluing up short bits then the strength will be very compromised. End grain glue joints are very poor holders.

    Regards
    John
    https://woodgears.ca/dowel/making.html

  4. #3
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    Default

    Here is a router version.
    Regards
    John
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbwYKx3baRI

  5. #4
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    Default



    For something like that I'd use a few string steadies for support along the length (roughed round at strategic spots on the unturned sections, of course) and a wheeled steady that I moved along as I worked. I'd also start at the tailstock end and work towards the headstock.

    I'd also probably rough the whole length to within a few mm (say 42-43mm) in the first few passes and then use a bull-nosed scraper with a sizing tool attachment to accurately size & clean up in the final pass.

    It's one of those jobs where more time is actually spent moving steadys, etc. around than actual turning.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc (AKA "Ghost who posts." )

  6. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Faulko View Post
    Hi,

    a mate has asked some questions re a project he is working on..and i'd thought I consult the collective brains trust here....
    He's after 2.2m long 38mm diameter spindles - he is keen to use recycled timber (i know its easy to go to Bunnings and buy dowel, but that's not the preferred option in this case..). I figure that assuming lathe length is not an issue, there would be considerable issues with flex given the diameter and length...and am thinking turning sections to be glued together is probably most practical option????

    cheers
    you called what they said..........I think

  7. #6
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    shoalhaven n.s.w
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Faulko View Post
    Hi,

    a mate has asked some questions re a project he is working on..and i'd thought I consult the collective brains trust here....
    He's after 2.2m long 38mm diameter spindles - he is keen to use recycled timber (i know its easy to go to Bunnings and buy dowel, but that's not the preferred option in this case..). I figure that assuming lathe length is not an issue, there would be considerable issues with flex given the diameter and length...and am thinking turning sections to be glued together is probably most practical option????

    cheers
    Yes it can be done, if you turn it in sections you could pre drill one and turn a pin to fit for gluing together, but you will need a long clamp once you get to the end gluing.

    Or turn it in one length. The longest dowel I have turned lately was 1.7 metres with one wheeled steady, the wheeled steady leaves less marks on the timber. Having the steady in the middle on the turning I did.
    We used to turn boat staves for the Navy at work 8 meters long with 4 steadies from memory.
    Sounds like a fun job
    Turning round since 1992

  8. #7
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    Default

    Thanks for the replies, I'll post an update if i end up having a crack and can overcome some of the logistical challenges!

    and Skew - what's a string steady?

    cheers

  9. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Faulko View Post

    and Skew - what's a string steady?

    cheers
    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=s...&bih=666&dpr=2
    Cheers

    DJ

  10. #9
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    A string steady usually has the same type of frame as a wheeled steady, except uses a cat's cradle of string instead of wheels, They're easy to pick out from the pics in the link DJ posted above.

    It has the advantage of being quick & easy to knock together (no need to upset the kids by stealing the wheels off their roller-blades, scooters & skateboards ) and is generally quicker to position & adjust than a wheeled steady. They're also very, very good at holding fine spindles, where you can't close up a wheeled steady enough without offsetting the wheels to each other. (Which can add a skewing effect to the spindle, often with catastrophic results.)

    Their disadvantages? While they're great vibration dampers, I wouldn't expect one to have the holding power of a wheeled steady. Especially in the event of a catch. Also, they do tend to leave friction or burnishing marks - depending on the RPM of the lathe, the timber used, type of string, whether you wax the string, etc. - so I prefer to use them as temporary steadies on unfinished sections, while I use my wheeled steadies on the finished sections.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc (AKA "Ghost who posts." )

  11. #10
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    Default

    This YouTube video shows a few methods for long spindles

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_eJ1IS6U3A
    Cheers

    DJ

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